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Anand Venigalla

The Millions Essay: "The Audacity of Prose"

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Bump. It seems like not many people are interested in this sad.png

 

I read this and I enjoyed a fair bit. Thanks for sharing.

 

I love Hemingway and other minimalist writers, but I think that Obioma's point is well taken and some of my favourite writers are the one's he lists as Nabokov and Joyce. In the comments some folks also talk about those who prefer the shorter, more "perfect" works to the sprawling, "audacious" epics. e.g. BARTLEBY < MOBY-DICK.

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Another long, audacious novel I'm enjoying right now is THE GOLDFINCH. Some people say it's overwritten and excessive, but I think it's not bad at all. Donna Tartt's prose is richly poetic and stylistically interesting. And the length is not bad; in fact, the story is quite well-paced.

And even if it were overwritten, I don't really see what improvement could be made by "editing" and "paring things down."

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Bump. It seems like not many people are interested in this sad.png

 

Well, I might have been interested if I'd known more about it. What I saw here didn't give me anything but a rather non-descript title and a link. It may be different for others, but for me, at A&F, I need more to go on when a subject is introduced... like the name of an artist I'm interested in, or an excerpt from the article in question, or a title that tells me I'll be interested in this subject.

 

This isn't a complaint. It's just a suggestion if you want to start threads and get more readers' attention.

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Thanks.

This article is a call to writers everywhere to shun the bare lifeless minimalism (not necessarily Hemingway or Carver minimalism here) and to embrace the audacious and beautiful nature of language, even if that means overwriting at times.

Expansive prose is a positive thing that can go wrong at times but is not bad per se.

And the great novels that are remembered as monuments more often than not lean to excess rather than austerity. Case in point: War and Peace, Les Miserables, The Brothers Karamazov, The Lord of the Rings, Moby-Dick, Bleak House, Great Expectations, The Scarlet Letter, Blood Meridian

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