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Veronica Marrs, Gilmore Girls, and Freaks and Geeks are all great (a bit older) shows that are great for teens and parents. Daredevil might be a bit violent depending on one's standards, but otherwise I think works...


Scott -- 2nd Story -- Twitter

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I haven't watched True Detective yet, though it's high on my list.  However, given HBO's reputation for abundant scenes of (s)exposition, I doubt it would meet your target audience's requirements.

 

 For mystery lovers, I haven't found a better recent series than Broadchurch.  It has occasional language, but I don't recall any graphic sexuality (I would check it first, though, just to be sure, since it's been a little while since I watched).  Its subject matter (the murder of a child in a small British town) means this is suitable for adults and older teens only.  It's a smart mystery with interesting twists, while looking honestly at grief and the consequences of family fragmentation.  The role of the church as a source of honest talk, community, and healing is handled in a (largely) positive way, to boot.


No mention of Doctor Who?!  I haven't watched the Capaldi shows, but this was requisite viewing with my teens for quite a while:  occasionally scary, but loaded with positive values (loyalty, fidelity, a search for nonviolent solutions, etc.).


To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

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For mystery lovers, I haven't found a better recent series than Broadchurch.  It has occasional language, but I don't recall any graphic sexuality (I would check it first, though, just to be sure, since it's been a little while since I watched).  Its subject matter (the murder of a child in a small British town) means this is suitable for adults and older teens only.  It's a smart mystery with interesting twists, while looking honestly at grief and the consequences of family fragmentation.  The role of the church as a source of honest talk, community, and healing is handled in a (largely) positive way, to boot.

No mention of Doctor Who?!  I haven't watched the Capaldi shows, but this was requisite viewing with my teens for quite a while:  occasionally scary, but loaded with positive values (loyalty, fidelity, a search for nonviolent solutions, etc.).

 

Andrew's description of Broadchurch is spot on for the first season. The second season was a gruesome muddle.

 

Doctor Who--brilliant for the 9th & 10th Doctors' seasons.  CT on the Doctor as Christ-figure...or not. A few endearing 11 episodes (e.g. "Vincent and the Doctor"), but generally it hasn't been as good. Capaldi is a good actor, but they don't seem to quite know who he's supposed to be, and companion Clara Oswald is wearing thin.


There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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One more question. I'm sure there are any number of examples of TV shows that got edgier or more outrageous over time; can anyone think of any shows that started out brash and provocative and got classier or more restrained over time?


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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First thing that pops into my head is NYPD Blue, but that is probably not enough of a change to what you are thinking.

Happy Days spun off from Love, American Style, and certainly seemed less tawdry than its predecessor. 

 

Maybe, *maybe*, M*A*S*H* which got became more serious and, hence, less brash in some ways.

 

It's been years, and I was never a fan of either, but my recollection was that Archie Bunker's Place was a less edgy All in the Family. 

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Thanks, Ken. I did think of "M*A*S*H," but my experience with that show is too limited and impressionistic to be sure. After some consideration, I'm thinking a good example may be the rebooted "Battlestar: Galactica," which was less racy toward the end of its run than in earlier seasons.


I didn't know "Happy Days" was a spinoff series. So "Laverne & Shirley," "Mork & Mindy" and "Joanie Loves Chachi" were all third-generation shows. I had no idea. 


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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I don't watch much TV, but one title that should be mentioned is Avatar: The Last Airbender (haven't seen its sequel, The Legend of Korra). Forget the M. Night movie. The original series, three seasons long, is quite surprisingly good. The most impressive thing about it is the variety: unlike most shows, it's really a different game in every episode. Many episodes are vastly different genre send-ups, from wire-fu to western to Bergmanesque chamber drama, and nearly all of this material really works.

 

As I recall, it should be appropriate for just about all ages, unless some of the fight scenes are too overwhelming for the very young. An early-adolescent romance is one of the major plot threads, but it's delicately handled.

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>can anyone think of any shows that started out brash and provocative and got classier or more restrained over time?

 

Soap.


Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

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Just getting back after long vacation.

 

- Yes to Beth's assessment of Doctor Who - Eccleston and Tennant are the go-to doctors

- Ditto Rushmore's comments on Avatar - my kids and I all loved this - good humor, drama, adventure - with consistent focus (without sermonizing) on virtues like selflessness, fidelity, and compassion


To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

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Thanks for all the discussion, everyone!

 

The finished piece went live this week. It wound up being less a catalog of shows and more a discussion of principles illustrated with show references.

 

It's a decent piece, but I didn't get to mention a lot of the shows I would have liked to, nor to talk nearly as much as I would have liked about the shows I did mention. 


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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