Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Tyler

Mary Poppins Returns (2018)

Recommended Posts

Looks like Bert hasn't aged a day either...? (If anything, he got younger. Lin-Manuel Miranda is currently 38, and Dick Van Dyke was 39 when Mary Poppins came out. Emily Blunt, for her part, is 35, while Julie Andrews was 29 when Mary Poppins came out.)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Peter T Chattaway said:

Looks like Bert hasn't aged a day either...? (If anything, he got younger. Lin-Manuel Miranda is currently 38, and Dick Van Dyke was 39 when Mary Poppins came out. Emily Blunt, for her part, is 35, while Julie Andrews was 29 when Mary Poppins came out.)

 

IMDB lists the character as “Jack,” fwiw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a fan. I was, unfortunately, sick when I watched this, which complicates the viewing situation, but damned if the film didn't overcome that.

I kept watching Blunt like a Soviet ice skating judge -- just looking for anything to penalize, but she was the bomb. Miranda was, possibly, even better.

The story is kinda meh, as are the new kids, but there is an infectious joyfulness about the whole enterprise that feels fresh in the face of so much slick commercialism at the movies these days. 

FWIW, the test audience I saw it with loved it. I saw a mom talking to her tyke, and he asked if they could come back "tomorrow" to watch it again. There's a little bit of fan service, but only a dash. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was underwhelmed. It has so many direct comparisons to the original, and this film doesn't come out ahead in any of them.

I did think Blunt and Miranda were excellent, but they couldn't overcome the uninspired script for me.

https://catholiccinephile.wordpress.com/2018/12/21/mary-poppins-returns/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely underwhelmed here, too. Miranda's opening song seemed almost like self-parody to me, the way his voice warbled. Blunt was excellent, though.

I know I shouldn't expect better from screenwriters these days, but it was a bit annoying to see such formulaic stuff as an action-packed chase sequence and a beat-the-clock climax. The original Mary Poppins had nothing to do with that. And I wasn't sure what to make of the way the animated world tried to intrude on the non-animated world, or the way they kept playing the is-it-real-or-isn't-it thing, where people outside of Mary's immediate orbit *can't* see the fantastic stuff she's doing (a la the invisible "God" figure in Exodus: Gods & Kings) or, alternatively, they show up after all the fantastic stuff has gone away, so they dismiss the kids' stories as mere fiction (a la Sesame Street's Snuffleupagus, who -- at least when I was a kid -- was seen by Big Bird but never by anyone else). These, too, seemed like themes that the original film never had any interest in. They made it hard to conceive of this film as an actual sequel, in spirit, to the original Mary Poppins.

And hey, between this film and A Quiet Place, what's up with Emily Blunt and bathtubs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...