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Oscars 2016 - nominations


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I don't see any way to add polls to existing threads in the current version of A&F, so I guess I'll just do the general nominations tally here.

Here's the basic tally, with the films I've seen in bold:

12 nominations

The Revenant -- Picture, director (Alejandro G. Inarritu), cinematography, actor (Leonardo DiCaprio), supporting actor (Tom Hardy), production design, costume design, makeup and hairstyling, film editing, visual effects, sound editing, sound mixing

10 nominations

Mad Max: Fury Road -- Picture, director (George Miller), cinematography, production design, costume design, makeup and hairstyling, film editing, visual effects, sound editing, sound mixing

7 nominations

The Martian -- Picture, adapted screenplay, actor (Matt Damon), production design, visual effects, sound editing, sound mixing

6 nominations

Bridge of Spies -- Picture, supporting actor (Mark Rylance), production design, original screenplay, original score, sound mixing
Carol -- Adapted screenplay, cinematography, actress (Cate Blanchett), supporting actress (Rooney Mara), costume design, original score
Spotlight -- Picture, director (Tom McCarthy), supporting actor (Mark Ruffalo), supporting actress (Rachel McAdams), original screenplay, film editing

5 nominations

The Big Short -- Picture, director (Adam McKay), supporting actor (Christian Bale), adapted screenplay, film editing
Star Wars: The Force Awakens -- Film editing, visual effects, original score, sound editing, sound mixing

4 nominations

The Danish Girl -- Actor (Eddie Redmayne), supporting actress (Alicia Vikander), production design, costume design
Room -- Picture, director (Lenny Abrahamson), adapted screenplay, actress (Brie Larson)

3 nominations

Brooklyn -- Picture, adapted screenplay, actress (Saoirse Ronan)
The Hateful Eight -- Cinematography, supporting actress (Jennifer Jason Leigh), original score

Sicario -- Cinematography, original score, sound editing

2 nominations

Ex Machina -- Original screenplay, visual effects
Inside Out -- Animated feature, original screenplay
Steve Jobs -- Actor (Michael Fassbender), supporting actress (Kate Winslet)

1 nominations

Amy -- Documentary feature
Anomalisa -- Animated feature
Boy and the World -- Animated feature
Cartel Land -- Documentary feature
Cinderella -- Costume design
Creed -- Supporting actor (Sylvester Stallone)
Embrace of the Serpent -- Foreign language film
Fifty Shades of Grey -- Original song
45 Years -- Actress (Charlotte Rampling)
The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared -- Makeup and hairstyling
The Hunting Ground -- Original song
Joy -- Actress (Jennifer Lawrence)
The Look of Silence -- Documentary feature
Mustang -- Foreign language film
Racing Extinction -- Original song
Shaun the Sheep Movie -- Animated feature
Son of Saul -- Foreign language film
SPECTRE -- Original song
Straight Outta Compton -- Original screenplay
Theeb -- Foreign language film
Trumbo -- Actor (Bryan Cranston)
A War -- Foreign language film
What Happened, Miss Simone? -- Documentary feature
When Marnie Was There -- Animated feature
Winter on Fire: Ukraine's Fight for Freedom -- Documentary feature
Youth -- Original song

So, for the second year in a row, an Inarritu film leads with the most nominations. Last year, Birdman won despite having no nomination for film editing (the first time that had happened since 1980's Ordinary People, I believe). Can Inarritu become the first director to win back-to-back Best Director awards since Joseph L. Mankiewicz won back-to-back Best Director awards for 1949's A Letter to Three Wives and 1950's All About Eve? (Side note: People still talk about All About Eve these days, but when was the last time you heard anyone talk about A Letter to Three Wives? Which of Inarritu's films will people still be talking about 65 years from now?)

Then there's runner-up Mad Max: Fury Road. When was the last time a pure action film such as this got so many Oscar nods? Raiders of the Lost Ark, maybe? (Raiders was nominated in eight competitive categories and was also given a special achievement award.)

They say that films almost never win Best Picture unless they have been at least *nominated* for Best Film Editing and Best Directing, so by that logic, this year's Best Picture winner would have to be The Big Short, Mad Max: Fury Road, The Revenant/ or Spotlight.

I'm really happy with the animation category this year: only one American kids' movie in the lot, and it's a good one (i.e. Inside Out).

I remember asking this question at Facebook a month or two ago, when the awards buzz for Stallone started heating up, but how often has an actor been nominated twice for playing the same character? And after a 39-year gap between films, as was the case here? The closest thing I can think of, without going through my Facebook archives, is Paul Newman, who was nominated for playing "Fast Eddie" Felson in 1961's The Hustler and 1986's The Color of Money (and he won on his second attempt).

The Force Awakens marks the triumphant return of Star Wars to the Best Visual Effects category, at least as far as nominations go. It wasn't even *nominated* for Revenge of the Sith (that film got just a makeup nomination), and the other two prequels were nominated but lost to The Matrix and The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers. The original trilogy came out before the Best Visual Effects category even *existed*, so they had to invent special achievement awards for those films. Could The Force Awakens be the first Star Wars film to win in a *competitive* Best Visual Effects showdown?

More thoughts later, as they occur to me.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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One catch, Peter, Brooklyn is listed under 2 nominations - it has 3.

Considering Spotlight and The Big Short are the only two films to be nominated for all three major guild awards (Actors', Directors' and Producers') and receive director and editing nominations, it might make sense to say they have the best shot. On the other hand, considering the number of nominations for both The Revenant and Mad Max: Fury Road, both of those clearly have a shot as well. My guess is it comes down to Spotlight and The Revenant.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Whoops, thanks!

Yeah, the lack of acting-category love is certainly a strike against Mad Max. (How long has it been since a film won Best Picture without at least *one* acting nomination? Ah, 2008's Slumdog Millionaire was apparently "the eleventh Best Picture Oscar winner without a single acting nomination", according to Wikipedia.) Not sure what to make of the fact that the Screen Actors Guild didn't acknowledge The Revenant's supporting cast, though (not even Tom Hardy!).

The Producers' Guild doesn't really matter here, as every single one of the Oscar nominees was nominated for that, too. Oh, except for Room, but I don't think anyone really considers that a front-runner here. And the Directors' Guild is a near-perfect match for the Oscar nominees too, with the exception again of Room getting the Oscar nomination in the spot that the DGA gave to The Martian.)

But Room was already disqualified for front-runner status on intra-Oscar grounds alone, simply because it didn't get nominated for Best Film Editing.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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21 minutes ago, Peter T Chattaway said:

I don't see any way to add polls to existing threads in the current version of A&F, so I guess I'll just do the general nominations tally here.
 

 

Peter, when you click to start a new topic, there is a "Poll" option. Once you click on the New Topic button, "Poll" is located in the Light Blue banner near the top of the page, next to "Content", underneath the Dark Blue banner that reads "Topic Details".

Poll.JPG

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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John Drew wrote:
: Peter, when you click to start a new topic, there is a "Poll" option.

Yes, but I don't want to start a new topic, I want to edit an *existing* topic. I.e., I want to go into the individual threads for all the different categories and create polls at the top of them, now that we know who the nominees are.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Just thought of something: If George Miller wins Best Director this year, would he become the first director to win Oscars for *both* live-action *and* animated films (given that he already won an Oscar for Happy Feet nine years ago)?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 month later...

So, just for the record...

6 wins

  • Mad Max: Fury RoadProduction design, costume design, makeup and hairstyling, film editing, sound editing, sound mixing

3 wins

  • The RevenantDirector (Alejandro G. Inarritu), cinematography, actor (Leonardo DiCaprio)

2 wins

  • Spotlight — Picture, original screenplay

1 win

  • Amy — Documentary feature
  • The Big ShortAdapted screenplay
  • Bridge of SpiesSupporting actor (Mark Rylance)
  • The Danish GirlSupporting actress (Alicia Vikander)
  • Ex MachinaVisual effects
  • The Hateful Eight — Original score
  • Inside Out — Animated feature
  • Room Actress (Brie Larson)
  • Son of Saul — Foreign language film
  • SPECTRE — Original song

I haven't fact-checked this yet, but someone tweeted that Mad Max: Fury Road now ties the original Star Wars for the most Oscars without Best Picture or Best Director. (Star Wars also got a seventh, non-competitive, special-achievement award for its sound effects.)

Spotlight is the first movie to win Best Picture and only one other award since 1952's The Greatest Show on Earth.

Brooklyn and The Martian were the only Best Picture nominees that didn't win anything.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens failed to get a single Oscar. (No Star Wars film has won a competitive Oscar since The Empire Strikes Back, though Return of the Jedi did get a special achievement award for its visual effects.)

Ennio Morricone not only won his first Oscar for The Hateful Eight (the first Tarantino to have an original score, if memory serves), he is also, at 87, the oldest Oscar winner ever.

Inarritu is now the third person to win back-to-back Best Director awards; however, like John Ford and Joe Mankiewicz before him, only one of the two films he directed won Best Picture.

Mark Rylance is only the second actor, following Lincoln's Daniel Day-Lewis, to win an Oscar for a Spielberg film.

Ex Machina is reportedly the least-expensive film to win the visual-effects award since 1979's Alien. Also: it is the first movie ever to win an Oscar for a *female* visual-effects artist (who shared the award with three male colleagues). Apparently only two women have been nominated in that category before, the last one for 1993's Cliffhanger.

SPECTRE is now the second Bond film in a row to win an Oscar for its theme song, the other being 2012's Skyfall, which also won an Oscar for sound editing. Prior to those two films, the only Bond films that had won any Oscars were 1964's Goldfinger, for sound effects, and 1965's Thunderball, for visual effects.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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