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Jeannette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc


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Links to our threads on Carl Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928), Victor Fleming's Joan of Arc (1948), Otto Preminger's Saint Joan (1957), Robert Bresson's The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962),  Philippe Ramos' The Silence of Joan (2011), The Hollow Crown (2012-2016), Kimberly Cutter's The Maid (in development) and Dana Stevens' The Maid and The Queen: The Secret History of Joan of Arc (in development).

Link to a thread from Sep-Oct 2003 in which SDG and I butted heads over Joan of Arc.

Links to our threads on earlier Bruno Dumont films Twentynine Palms (2003), Hadewijch (2009), Outside Satan (2011), Camille Claudel 1915 (2013) and Li'l Quinquin (2014). We don't seem to have any threads on The Life of Jesus (1997), Humanité (1999), Flanders (2006) or Slack Bay (2016).

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Berlin: Bruno Dumont Set for Joan of Arc Musical Drama (EXCLUSIVE)
Bruno Dumont, whose 2013 Juliette Binoche starrer “Camille Claudel 1915” competed in Berlin, will next be directing “Jeanette,” a musical drama based on Charles Peguy’s play “Le Mystere de la charite de Jeanne d’Arc.
Produced by Jean Brehat for 3B Prods., “Jeanette” the musical will focus on the part of Peguy’s play that deals with Joan of Arc as a child, from age 8-12, when she started to embrace her sacred mission.
Arte France Cinema is co-producing. Like 2014’s “Li’l Quinquin,” Dumont’s comedy-drama TV mini-series that premiered at Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight and sold worldwide, “Jeanette” is being produced for television but will be repped by a sales agent for theatrical distribution abroad.
“Jeanette’s” rock and techno score will be composed by Gautier Serre (aka Igorrr) and choreographed by Philippe Decoufle, whose credits include “Le Dernier Chaperon rouge” and “New Order: Substance.”
Shooting will start in August.
Variety, February 14

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 year later...

French Auteur Bruno Dumont on His Upcoming Joan of Arc Musical ‘Jeanette’
Meanwhile you’ve just finished your first musical “Jeanette” about Joan of Arc, based on a text by turn-of-the-century French poet and writer Charles Péguy. “Jeanette” will feature an experimental electro-pop score. Can you talk to me it?
I have adapted a part of Peguy’s piece titled “La Petite Jean” about when Joan of Arc was between 8 and 14 years old. My film ends where all the other movies begin. What I was interested in is how a young very simple peasant girl can become such an icon and have a desire to become a warrior of God, which for me is a total mystery. I tried to understand that, which is exactly what Peguy does. Except he’s a poet and quite difficult to read. I tried to do it through a musical, with songs and dance so that these very difficult questions could become very easy [to understand]. In other words I’m glad because it’s a way of saying very deep things — because Peguy is very deep — in a way that’s very approachable by a wide audience, since there is now a large audience for musical comedies.
Can you tell me more about the musical aspect?
The melodies are very popular, the music is electro-pop, so very contemporary. It’s what young people listen to. They songs are a bit like rap. There are some very poetic themes in rap, Peguy is actually a rapper if you listen to his poems. It’s a big cauldron of genres, produced by Arte for both TV and movie theatres. We have two versions. In France it will go out on TV on Arte followed by a theatrical release.
Variety, March 10

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 year later...

After the first half, I said to Suz, “If the second half is that good, this might be my favorite film of the year.” It wasn’t, unfortunately, but it’s still an amazing film that I can’t wait to see again. 

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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  • 3 months later...
49 minutes ago, Joel Mayward said:

!!!

This is not available *anywhere* so this is very good news.

It is now - it came out on US DVD/Blu-ray a few months ago. But hopefully streaming will allow more people to appreciate it.

I never posted here when I finally got a disc that I could watch. It's absolutely fascinating, a complex and searching theological dialogue wrapped up in a medieval mystery play wrapped up in a hard-rock musical. Everyone who's interested in portrayals of the complexities and difficulties of faith, or simply in weird genre-bending, should see it.

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  • 1 year later...

I just watched it tonight after avoiding it since I first read about its appearance at Cannes three years ago. I was not attracted to the idea of a grunge rock score for a headbanging Joan of Arc. But I gave in and watched it because of its nomination for our top 100, and I couldn't be happier that I did or more shocked at how I responded to it. The grunge music sung by an 8-year-old and robotic choreography were exactly as silly as I expected. What I could not have prepared myself for was how effective they were. These crazy stylistic techniques work perfectly for the themes of holy discontent and righteous indignation. The headbanging even serves as a form of prayer through which Jeanette/Jeanne enters ecstatic states. The giddy tone presents truths about childhood, even a childhood that's not particularly happy. It helps us see what made Jeannette different from most other children. Everyone around her wanted her to be happy. She didn't care about being happy. She cared about having and living out a divine purpose. All the unconventional and hilarious things that make this movie so odd are the very same things that show Jeanette's self-understanding and how she developed the belief of what she was called to do in life and who she was called to be.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Ed, I merged this with the previously existing thread (KRM). 

Edited by Ed Bertram
Merge with previous thread
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