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NBooth

Call Me by Your Name (Luca Guadagnino 2017)

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NBooth   

This might be of interest around these parts primarily for the Sufjan Stevens connection (that is, Stevens is providing the soundtrack, so here's a link to our thread):

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In advance of the Sundance Film Festival, Sony Pictures Classics has swooped in and scooped up worldwide rights to Call Me by Your Name, a gay love story directed by Italy’s Luca Guadagnino, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed.

Set to debut in the festival’s Premieres section on Jan. 22, Call Me by Your Name is based on Andre Aciman’s novel of the same name and stars Armie Hammer as a 24-year old American scholar spending the summer of 1983 in Northern Italy, where he attracts the attention of a 17-year-old Jewish-American boy, played by Timothee Chalamet. Michael Stuhlbarg rounds out the cast as the boy’s father.

Aciman's most recent novel, Enigma Variations is getting a little positive buzz.

Edited by NBooth

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Kyle Buchanan: Why Sundance Fell in Love With the Gay Romance Call Me by Your Name

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Though many thought the success of 2005's Brokeback Mountain would pave the way for more top-tier films about same-sex love, it's only recently, with movies like Carol and Moonlight, that Brokeback's accomplishment appears to have borne fruit. Call Me by Your Name is every bit as marvelous as those films, and it's directed with striking confidence by Guadagnino, whose previous movies, A Bigger Splash and I Am Love, were delightful in their bratty brashness. This film is more tempered but every bit as intimate, especially when Hammer and Chalamet shed their clothes, their bodies becoming billboards for desire. "I truly tried to diminish the sense of sacredness that happens when you film naked actors and actresses," Guadagnino told me last night. "I don't like that prudishness."

Which reminds me, here's our thread on A Bigger Splash and here's the one on I Am Love.

Edited by NBooth

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Currently at 100% at Rotten Tomatoes (out of 20 reviews)

Consequence of Sound

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 Lustrously shot by Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, the sun-bathed days and idyllic nights of the region are picturesque, drowning every frame of the film in the kind of decadence that’s characterized Guadagnino’s prior work (I Am Love, A Bigger Splash), but with a strength of purpose that he’s never fully achieved to this point.

Birth Movies Death:

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It’s a little shaggy and the Sufjan Stevens-heavy soundtrack is often more distracting than it is accommodating, but what small complaints to make in a film as enchanting and rich as this one. We are incredibly fortunate to be witness to Elio and Oliver’s romance. Call Me By Your Name is a beautiful gift of a film, one that is meant to be treasured and savored for years to come.

Vanity Fair:

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Working with cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, Guadagnino gives Call Me by Your Name the faded vibrancy of an old postcard, of a treasured memory. There’s a gentleness, a quietness tempering all the intense surges of feeling rippling between Elio and Oliver. It’s an exquisitely composed film, blessed by terrific performances and perfectly scored by a selection of classical compositions and a pair of new songs by Sufjan Stevens. (Yes, on top of everything else, there’s new Sufjan Stevens music too.)

The Hollywood Reporter:

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Though Hammer might be the bigger star and he certainly has a juicier-than-usual role here that he clearly relishes, the true breakout of the film is 21-year-old Chalamet. Elio is someone who is experiencing a lot of things for the first time, for which he barely has any words, but Chalamet’s face and body language turn his character into an open book. The minutes-long and wordless final shot, another rare close-up of Elio, is so mesmerizing that it immediately cements his status as one of the world’s brightest young talents. The chemistry between the men is palpable, but what's more important, they convey their characters' complex emotions, expectations and thoughts without necessarily opening their mouths.

 

Tallerico at Ebert calls it "one of the best films of not just this year’s Sundance but all five years I’ve been coming to the festival."

Edited by NBooth

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Vulture has the trailer, which includes a bit of Sufjan Stevens' "Mystery of Love."

 

EDIT: Embedding

 

Edited by NBooth

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