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Oscars 2017 - nominations


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Analysis later. For now, the feature-length nominees, grouped by film (with the films I've seen in bold):

14 nominations in 13 categories

  • La La Land — Picture, director (Damien Chazelle), original screenplay, cinematography, actor (Ryan Gosling), actress (Emma Stone), production design, costume design, film editing, original score, original song (x2), sound editing, sound mixing

8 nominations

  • Arrival — Picture, director (Denis Villeneuve), adapted screenplay, production design, cinematography, film editing, sound editing, sound mixing
  • Moonlight — Picture, director (Barry Jenkins), adapted screenplay, cinematography, supporting actor (Mahershala Ali), supporting actress (Naomie Harris), film editing, original score

6 nominations

  • Hacksaw Ridge — Picture, director (Mel Gibson), actor (Andrew Garfield), film editing, sound editing, sound mixing
  • Lion — Picture, adapted screenplay, cinematography, supporting actor (Dev Patel), supporting actress (Nicole Kidman), original score
  • Manchester by the Sea — Picture, director (Kenneth Lonergan), original screenplay, actor (Casey Affleck), supporting actor (Lucas Hedges), supporting actress (Michelle Williams)

4 nominations

  • Fences — Picture, adapted screenplay, actor (Denzel Washington), supporting actress (Viola Davis)
  • Hell or High Water — Picture, original screenplay, supporting actor (Jeff Bridges), film editing

3 nominations

  • Hidden Figures — Picture, adapted screenplay, supporting actress (Octavia Spencer)
  • Jackie — Actress (Natalie Portman), costume design, original score

2 nominations

  • Deepwater Horizon — Visual effects, sound editing
  • Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them — Production design, costume design
  • Florence Foster Jenkins — Actress (Meryl Streep), visual effects
  • Kubo and the Two Strings — Animated feature, visual effects
  • A Man Called Ove — Foreign language film, makeup and hairstyling
  • Moana — Animated feature, original song
  • Passengers — Production design, original score
  • Rogue One: A Star Wars Story — Visual effects, sound mixing

1 nominations

  • Allied — Costume design
  • Captain Fantastic — Actor (Viggo Mortensen)
  • Doctor Strange — Visual effects
  • Elle — Actress (Isabelle Huppert)
  • Fire at Sea — Documentary feature
  • Hail, Caesar! — Production design
  • I Am Not Your Negro — Documentary feature
  • Jim: The James Foley Story — Original song
  • The Jungle Book — Visual effects
  • Land of Mine — Foreign language film
  • Life, Animated — Documentary feature
  • The Lobster — Original screenplay
  • Loving — Actress (Ruth Negga)
  • My Life as a Zucchini — Animated feature
  • Nocturnal Animals — Supporting actor (Michael Shannon)
  • O.J.: Made in America — Documentary feature
  • The Red Turtle — Animated feature
  • The Salesman — Foreign language film
  • Silence — Cinematography
  • Star Trek Beyond — Makeup and hairstyling
  • Suicide Squad — Makeup and hairstyling
  • Sully — Sound editing
  • Tanna — Foreign language film
  • 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi — Sound mixing
  • 13th — Documentary feature
  • Toni Erdmann — Foreign language film
  • Trolls — Original song
  • 20th Century Women — Original screenplay
  • Zootopia — Animated feature

Okay, here's *one* stat I just posted on Twitter. For those who keep track of this sort of thing: Of the 20 acting nominations, 6 went to black actors, 1 went to an actor of South Asian descent, and none went to Hispanic actors. If you use American demographics as your "diversity" reference point, blacks make up 13-16% of the American population and got 30% of the acting nominations, Asians make up 5.6% of the American population and got 5% of the acting nominations, and Hispanics make up 17.6% of the American population and got nothing. (But of course, quite a few of the acting nominees, of whatever ethnicity, are not American. Isabelle Huppert was even nominated for a foreign language film! And then you've got Ruth Negga, who is Ethiopian-Irish, and Naomie Harris and Andrew Garfield and Michael Shannon and Dev Patel, who are all British, and Nicole Kidman, who is Australian, etc. So American demographics only go so far. But using global demographic statistics as a reference point would also be dodgy because the Oscars obviously favour English-language films above all else -- but again, see Isabelle Huppert's nomination for the French-language Elle.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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So, a few other points:

Two of the three top-grossing Best Picture nominees (Arrival and Hidden Figures; the third film in the top three is La La Land) are about female scientists working with space travelers (whether aliens or astronauts).

Mel Gibson has pretty much completed his comeback. Not only was his lead actor nominated, but so was Gibson himself, as well as his film.

Deadline says La La Land could be the first "original" movie musical to win Best Picture since 1958's Gigi. (West Side Story, Oliver! and Chicago -- have there been other Best Picture musicals since then? -- were based on stage productions.)

Manchester by the Sea marks the first time that a film distributed by an online streaming outlet (in this case, Amazon) has been nominated for Best Picture. Netflix, which has been nominated for documentaries before, was nominated in those categories again, with 13th in the documentary feature mix and Extremis and The White Helmets in the documentary short category.

O.J.: Made in America, at 7 hours and 47 minutes, is the longest film ever nominated for an Oscar.

Star Trek Beyond is the 7th Star Trek movie (out of 13) to get at least one Oscar nomination, and the 4th to be nominated specifically for makeup. The only Star Trek film to actually *win* an Oscar so far is the 2009 reboot -- which won for makeup.

Tanna is the first Australian film to be nominated for foreign language film.

While blacks make up 13-16% of the American population (about 13% identify as "black" on the U.S. census, while another 3% identify as "black" combined with other ethnicities) and got 30% of the acting nominations, Deadline reports that " the Multi-Ethnic Media Coalition made of of Hispanic, Asian and American Indian groups said today they were disappointed at again being 'noticeably underrepresented or not represented at all.' " (There were no Latino acting nominees this year, and only one South Asian acting nominee. Over the past 20 years, roughly 13% of the acting awards have gone to black actors, and only one of the 80 awards has gone to a Latino actor, namely Traffic's Benicio Del Toro -- though No Country for Old Men's Javier Bardem and Vicky Cristina Barcelona's Penelope Cruz, both of whom are Spanish and are thus European rather than North or South American, also won Oscars in that timeframe. On the other hand, the last three Best Director awards have gone to Mexican filmmakers, and the filmmaker who won before *that* was Taiwanese by birth.)

Snubs? Everyone involved with Silence except its cinematographer. Hidden Figures star Taraji P Henson. Arrival star Amy Adams. Everyone invlved with Sully except the sound editors. Florence Foster Jenkins supporting actor Hugh Grant. And, oh, why not: Deadpool.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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One other interesting factoid:

Octavia Spencer is apparently the first female black actor to be nominated for an Oscar after winning one (for 2011's The Help, in her case).

She would not be the first black actor, period, to have been nominated for an Oscar after winning one, though. Denzel Washington has already won two Oscars (for 1989's Glory and 2001's Training Day) and he was nominated again this year. (It's actually his seventh nomination this year; he won his first Oscar on his second nomination, so he has been nominated five more times since the first time he won.) And Morgan Freeman was nominated for 2009's Invictus after winning for 2004's Million Dollar Baby.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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IndieWire notes that two prominent documentaries that got snubbed were Weiner (possibly because of the role the real-life guy played in undermining Clinton's campaign long after the movie was finished?) and Cameraperson.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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