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The Family Way (1966)


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Hey Peter,

Your movie is available on DVD now, in the UK. This from a letter in the September SIGHT & SOUND...

...Who is responsible for the new series of double-feature DVDs of English movies of the 1960s, particularly the pairing of the Losey-Pinter
Accident
(titled
The Accident
on the box) with the feelgood working-class comedy
The Family Way
? While I wouldn't mind having
Accident
on my shelves I certainly wouldn't want to revisit the latter (or any other Jywel Bennet film of the same era). ... (Michael O'Sullivan, Brighton)

Nasty, small-minded, picayune man, that O'Sullivan, eh wot? "Feelgood comedy"? I don't think he was paying attention. Straining at a "The" and swallowing a camel.

At any rate, here's a place where you can buy it;

http://www.bensons-world.co.uk/dvd/product...00000079774.asp

(You probably already have the soundtrack CD. If not, there are a few on auction at eBay right now, but it looks like you'll get a better price at Amazon.com)

I've posted a couple hundred of my Soul Food Movies write-ups at letterboxd

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Ron wrote:

: Your movie is available on DVD now, in the UK.

[ blink ] Wow. If only it wasn't encoded for Region 2.

: Nasty, small-minded, picayune man, that O'Sullivan, eh wot?

No kidding. Can't even spell "Hywel" properly.

: You probably already have the soundtrack CD.

[ blink ] Wow. And it was released in May of this year! It seems Carl Aubut may not have been entirely correct when he told me the master tapes had gone missing.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Ron wrote:

: Your movie is available on DVD now, in the UK.

[ blink ]  Wow.  If only it wasn't encoded for Region 2...

I've got a multi-region player. Not that that helps you a whole lot, but if you buy the DVD, you can come over and play it...

Edited by Ron

I've posted a couple hundred of my Soul Food Movies write-ups at letterboxd

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  • 5 months later...

As you may recall, I got an el-cheapo multi-region player a few months ago ... so, not long after, I finally decided to order my first Region 2 DVD ... and it arrived a couple weeks ago, while I was busy with other stuff ... and I finally got around to watching it this afternoon.

I was nervous going into this, since I have said for years that this film is one of my three favorites of all time, but I hadn't actually seen it in a while, so who knew, maybe my tastes had changed or something and the film wouldn't impress me as much any more. Well, okay, yeah, nowadays I find myself thinking that some of the comedy bits -- especially the dinner-table bits between John Mills and Marjorie Rhodes -- are a little too, I dunno, sitcom-y; you could take certain moments between these two characters, lift them out of context, plop them down in the middle of a TV show, and no one would be the wiser. But darn it all if I didn't find myself getting teary-eyed just 15 minutes or so into the film, and again during the film's final reel, with a few loud laughs and a few soft sighs in between. So, not an "objectively" perfect movie by any stretch, but still a movie that speaks to parts of me that go way, way back.

It's a shame this movie isn't better known, though it's certainly not for lack of pedigree; it's based on a play by Bill Naughton, the playwright behind Alfie (which, like The Family Way, also came out in 1966), and it features a score by Paul McCartney and George Martin (which also happens to be the first-ever solo-Beatle project, composed while the band was taking a months-long break between their last-ever stadium concert and the recording of Sgt. Pepper). Former Disney child star Hayley Mills (Pollyanna, The Parent Trap), in her first "adult" role (you even get to see her naked butt -- ooh! aah!), is a babe, and utterly believable as a committed and "innocent" wife who begins to spend perhaps too much time with her brother-in-law (Murray Head) because HE, at least, makes her feel desirable; her husband (Hywel Bennett), you see, can't bring himself to sleep with her, for some reason. And Hayley's real-life dad, John Mills (Hobson's Choice, etc.), is outstanding as her character's husband's father, a somewhat dense and conservative working-class bloke who frowns upon his son's "queer" habits (the boy reads "fancy" books and listens to "fancy" music, like Beethoven! oh no!) but has fond memories of the childhood friend who actually shared many of these inclinations.

John Mills especially is a sheer delight; his character has some absurdly hilarious moments (he wakes his son and daughter-in-law to serve them breakfast in bed, the morning after their wedding night, and his first words to them are: "There's four Russians and a monkey walking out there" -- turns out he's referring to a newspaper story he just read about a space mission), and he's largely incapable of understanding what other people are trying to tell him at times (cf. the scene where the in-laws throw every euphemism in the book at him in a vain effort to explain that their daughter is still a virgin, but without using the word "virgin"), but these surface oddities float on a deep, and largely untapped, reservoir of sincere human feeling. Indeed, his very inability to understand what other people are feeling makes his situation all the more tragic, in a way, because you suspect he doesn't even realize just how much feeling there is in HIM, either. But I think it is very significant that HE is the first person who states, out loud, that there seems to be something wrong between his son and daughter-in-law. He may not be able to say WHAT the problem is, and his proposed solutions may not be entirely on-the-ball (though the film does ultimately support his view, I think), but it is he who brings it up, before anyone else outside that marriage does.

I first saw this movie when I was 12, and I can still remember how my dad showed it to the entire family and paused it, seemingly every other second, to explain some bit of sexual tension or some bit of British slang. (The narrator's opening lines: "Once upon a time, there was a virgin. She was 20 years old, and you might say, a rare bird." Pause. Dad: "Now, 'rare bird' is just a common expression that refers to any rare thing, but 'bird' is also British slang for a woman, and of course, what this narrator is pointing out is that most women don't wait for marriage before having sex any more...") I think, if I were showing this film to a child of that age, I would let him or her watch the film as a whole, and THEN go back and analyze it. But at any rate, I think this film did have an effect on how I viewed the prospect of marriage -- not only as a newlywed coping with unexpected problems, but as a middle-aged man like the John Mills character, settled into a routine that is only occasionally disrupted by memories of a life long over and thoughts of what might have been. It is especially interesting to watch this film now, again, over 21 years later, and realize that marriage and first-night jitters are STILL in my future, assuming they are there in the cards for me at all. (It is even more interesting when I ponder that the newlyweds in this film are only 20 years old or so themselves. I suspect any marriage experience I have now would be vastly different from whatever experience I might have had if I had gotten married when I was as young as these characters.) I can only imagine how this film will look when I am the John Mills character's age, or -- God willing -- if and when I have a son the age of that character's son.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 2 weeks later...

FWIW, I just finished checking out Accident (1967) -- I figured I might as well, since I own the film now -- and while it's an okay film in its way, I can't say it does much for me; maybe I just have a hard time connecting with some middle-aged prof's problems with fidelity.

Still, it's always interesting to see actors at the start of their careers -- especially Michael York in a significant supporting role as a young university student, and character stalwart Freddie Jones in a blink-and-you'll-miss-it bit part as a guy who walks into Harold Pinter's office and then leaves with Pinter right away; and while I recognize Stanley Baker from his roles in Helen of Troy (1956; he played Achilles) and The Guns of Navarone (1961; he played the reluctant knife expert), I think this is the first Dirk Bogarde movie I have ever seen.

While I can already feel this film fading fast from my memory, the one thing about it that does stand out is the sequence in which Bogarde's character goes on a dinner date with a woman not his wife, and the dialogue and the visuals are completely, utterly separate -- we see them going places and doing things, and we hear them talking, but the sights and sounds are disconnected in a way that really works, though I'd have to think about it a little more before I could explain WHY it really works. There's a certain level of disconnectedness there, though.

And I can't begin to imagine why someone paired this movie with The Family Way.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Accident is a strange movie, but one I am drawn back to time and again for reasons I am not quite sure of.

If you liked Bogarde (one of my favourite actors), I recommend The Servant (1963?), also directed by Joseph Losey and scripted by Harold Pinter:

Dirk Bogarde stars as the butler who responds to rather foppish architect James Fox's advertisement to find a servant. Enter Sarah Miles, and a complicated love triangle ensues. Order eventually descends into chaos as servant-master roles become blurred in this riveting allegory of social disintegration.

It is the sheer brilliance of the ensemble here that makes this film a true classic: Much of the credit must go to the skillful black-and-white photography of Douglas Slocombe, one of the most talented British cinematographers of all time. Stylistically, this is quintessential sixties British realism. Also noteworthy are John Dankworth's jazz-oriented score and Harold Pinter's screenplay. It cannot be denied, however, that the film stands or falls on the strength of the performances, and the cast here are on top form, especially Bogarde in perhaps his finest role.

Btw, thanks for introducing me to The Family Way. Not one I have heard of before, but certainly one I will keep an eye out for.

Drop by The Grace Pages, a rest-stop for fellow pilgrims.

-- Dave aka Alvy

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  • 3 months later...

I am reserving this spot for my observations on The Family Way (1966), which just arrived from Amazon this morning.

It comes (rather bizarrely) on a double bill with Joseph Losey's Accident, a favourite of mine.

I am not impressed with the packaging -- it doesn't even give the name of the director, and the other film is wrongly labelled The Accident.

However, I look forward to seeing the film, since Peter (and Ron?) has had me intrigued about it for so long.

Drop by The Grace Pages, a rest-stop for fellow pilgrims.

-- Dave aka Alvy

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First complaint: The picture is disappointingly in standard TV ratio.

Grrr.

Still looking forward to seeing the film though. What a great cast! I love Wilfred Pickles in Billy Liar (1963), and his inimitable northern tones were immediately recognizable when he chimed in with the narration. (Just watched the titles to get a feel for the film.)

Drop by The Grace Pages, a rest-stop for fellow pilgrims.

-- Dave aka Alvy

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AHEM.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Yeah, I knew we had a thread somewhere, but a search failed to turn up a single result. (Which makes me wonder how you found it...?) Thanks.

I am about two-thirds of the way through it. I was interrupted! I'll be watching the last third in a few minutes.

Btw, I see it is based on Bill Naughton's All in Good Time. I do know that play, 'cause I read it when I was about twelve; I just never saw the connection before -- assumed The Family Way was a totally new Bill Naughton creation for the screen.

Edited by Alvy

Drop by The Grace Pages, a rest-stop for fellow pilgrims.

-- Dave aka Alvy

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Okay, just please post your thoughts to the other thread ... so few of us have seen this film it doesn't make sense to spread ourselves out over multiple threads.

FWIW, I just ran a search for "hayley" -- easy to find.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Just finished watching The Family Way. Very disappointed with the DVD presentation. As I said on the other thread, the picture was in standard TV ratio, and there was no attempt to clean up the image. Plus the credits on the cover omitted Roy Boulting as director and also gave the duration as 120 minutes when it was nearer 100. Not to mention erroneously listing Accident as The Accident (which, now I think about it, probably has some impact on how one interprets the film).

Onto the film itself, however: I enjoyed it immensely. I chuckled my way through much of it, especially the banter between Mr and Mrs Fitton (John Mills and Marjorie Rhodes). I used to lap up these northern comedies "when I were a lad" (I remember reading Bill Naughton's play All in Good Time, on which this was based, at the age of about twelve, although I only realized the connection when I saw the credits).

I couldn't help but think to myself this was kind of the poor man's Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, first in the early bedroom scenes with Arthur (Hywel Bennett) and Jenny (the utterly irresistible -- well, to all but her husband, apparently -- Hayley Mills), but also with Mr Fitton's relationship with his male friend, whose name escapes me. Even the way this subplot about the friendship is developed, with only allusions made early on, before the more explicit references later on, put me in mind of Brick's relationship with Skipper in Hot Tin Roof. I wonder if Naughton deliberately concocted these ironic parallels...?

Gotta admit, the production is pretty shoddy in places. The continuity is awful. More than made up for by the quality of drama, though. I loved the swinging-sixties feel, especially in the early scenes. Interesting the way the generation gap was highlighted early on. Thorley Walters, whom I know and love from his days as a Hammer horror regular, was great as the vicar. Whole cast, in fact, were wonderful. Pity we didn't see more of Wilfred Pickles.

If you liked this, you simply must see John Schlesinger's Billy Liar (1963), another swinging-sixties northern comedy with far greater depths, and a much more polished production. (And my favourite film of all time, as I'm sure folk never tire of hearing.)

Drop by The Grace Pages, a rest-stop for fellow pilgrims.

-- Dave aka Alvy

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Glad you liked the film, Alvy!

Alvy wrote:

: Very disappointed with the DVD presentation. As I said on the other thread, the

: picture was in standard TV ratio, and there was no attempt to clean up the image.

If memory serves, it seemed to me that there were itsy-bitsy black bars at the very top and bottom of the screen, so I just assumed the film had been shot in a ratio that wasn't all that wide, but was still marginally different from standard TV. That might have been more of an NTSC-PAL conversion thing, though, for all I know. Or I could be misremembering this entirely (it happens...).

: Plus the credits on the cover omitted Roy Boulting as director and also gave the

: duration as 120 minutes when it was nearer 100.

Hmmm ... the IMDB says it's 115 minutes and that's always sounded right to me ...

: I couldn't help but think to myself this was kind of the poor man's Cat on a Hot

: Tin Roof, first in the early bedroom scenes with Arthur (Hywel Bennett) and Jenny

: (the utterly irresistible -- well, to all but her husband, apparently -- Hayley Mills),

: but also with Mr Fitton's relationship with his male friend, whose name escapes

: me. Even the way this subplot about the friendship is developed, with only

: allusions made early on, before the more explicit references later on, put me in

: mind of Brick's relationship with Skipper in Hot Tin Roof.

Interesting comparison! Somehow this had never occurred to me before -- but then, I've only seen Cat on a Hot Tin Roof once (a made-for-TV thing with Jessica Lange), and that was years ago, in a second-year English class at UBC (which would date my viewing of that play to the '89-'90 school year).

FWIW, I just checked Vito Russo's The Celluloid Closet, and (to go by the index) he mentions Cat on a Hot Tin Roof only once, in passing, as one of a handful of Tennessee Williams plays that had their gay elements deleted before they became films in the 1950s. The Family Way, on the other hand, gets two or three pages as he looks at that film and Sidney Furie's The Leather Boys (1964) as examples of films in which "homosexual panic limits the feelings between men."

(A couple more excerpts: "The appeal of the buddy relationship for heterosexual men has always been that of an escape from the role playing of men and women -- a safe, neutral emotional zone with no chance for confusion. The possibility that sex could intrude in such a relationship muddles the situation hopelessly. . . . The mother's suggestion that queerness might be a natural thing, something one could live with, works here because the heterosexuality of her son is never really in doubt. It is the father's relationship with his friend that is at issue in the final scenes of the film, not the inadequacies of his son. Mills breaks down and cries when he sees finally how much like Billy his son has come to be. It is possible that his son is in fact the offspring of Billy; but Mills is crying for the adolescent freedom he lost when Billy disappeared.")

: If you liked this, you simply must see John Schlesinger's Billy Liar (1963),

: another swinging-sixties northern comedy with far greater depths, and a much

: more polished production. (And my favourite film of all time, as I'm sure folk

: never tire of hearing.)

I'll keep an eye open! (Seems Videomatica has it, at least...)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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You can get Billy Liar on VHS from Vancouver Library if you're interested. I remember borrowing it myself about eighteen months ago.

Drop by The Grace Pages, a rest-stop for fellow pilgrims.

-- Dave aka Alvy

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  • 9 months later...

Link to Billy Liar thread.

R.I.P. John Mills.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 year later...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 2 years later...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 11 months later...

Peter, your Proustian appreciation of this film is totally sympathetic. We all have titles like these in our personal canon—films that usher us into a strange world of adult feeling and remain present our entire lives. I can name a film (also British, also 1967) that's had such an effect on me—one that I hope will eventually make it to DVD but whose obscurity lends it a certain appeal, like that of a forgotten book you discover in a neglected corner of the library.

For me, the greatest surprise in this thoroughly lovely film (more surprising than the appearance of Hayley Mills's bare behind) is the final scene—not a blissful last look at the departing couple, but a pensive shot of John Mills in frozen tableau recalling his boyhood friend. It's a strange choice to close the film on such a note, but it somehow feels poetically right, and makes me wonder whether the Mills character isn't the "main" character after all.

This strikes me as a fine example of the kind of British comedy-drama that more or less started with Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (a genre that I became very fond of in my teens), and which emphasizes the traits of working-class folk over the privileged aristocracy. In that spirit, the Boultings get so many details right (the arm-wrestling scene that swiftly establishes the relationship between the father and his son; the bulging close-ups of the wedding guests stuffing their faces with biscuit at the reception; the grim hilarity of the evening walk in which the young husband is reminded everywhere of his sexual duties; Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment playing in the theater where Hywel Bennett works). And the music is directly appealing to the emotions—I love how it dovetails into the church organ during the opening credits. John Mills is excellent, and Bennett and Ms. Mills are appealing as the young couple (has Hayley ever been cuter?), but Marjorie Rhodes and Avril Angers steal the show as the mothers of the couple. Notice the subtle facial expressions when Rhodes recalls with gentle dismay her own disappointing honeymoon—that's great acting.

As an aside, I rented this from Eddie Brandt's Saturday Matinee. The feature was preceded on the VHS tape by the Warner Brothers home video logo, leading me to believe that the copy may have been transferred from a PAL master. Either way, I was grateful to see it.

Edited by Nathaniel

"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

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  • 2 years later...

Ah, technology. For years, this film was utterly unavailable on video in North America, so I used to dub copies of the film (from the copy I had taped off of TV) and send those tapes to friends of mine via the mail. But now? All I have to do is point y'all to YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoupaOy9LvM

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 5 months later...

For those who are still looking for a way to see this film, click here.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 2 months later...

Just finished watching it before voting. Must say I'm glad I did. Great film. Thanks Peter!

It's a pretty moving ending. I was surprised how funny it was and how insightful.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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I was surprised how funny it was and how insightful.

I can relate. I laughed aloud a few times, which doesn't typically happen when I'm watching a film by myself. By the time the final scene arrived between father and son, I was surprised and quite moved.

Also, I found Hywel Bennett to bear a strikingly strong resemblance to Zac Efron. Weird, I know.

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Joel Mayward wrote:

: Also, I found Hywel Bennett to bear a strikingly strong resemblance to Zac Efron. Weird, I know.

Ha! Okay, that made *me* laugh out loud!

SDG wrote:

: Holy crap, Peter. I can't believe your parents let you watch this when you were 12.

I think it would be more accurate to say my dad *made* me watch it. It was my mom who *let* him make the rest of us watch it. smile.png

And my dad paused the movie, like, every two minutes to explain stuff to us: British slang, working-class living conditions, sexual psychology, the works. (The very first line of the film is the narrator saying, "Once upon a time, there was a virgin. She was nineteen years old, and, you might say, a rare bird." I'm pretty sure my dad paused the video *right there* to explain that "rare bird" was a British colloquialism for rare things in general, and that "bird" was also British slang for an attractive woman, so what the narrator was doing was making a pun, you see... And on it went like that for the rest of the entire movie. I didn't revisit the film until about four and a half years later, when I was 16 years old and sort-of living on my own while my family was in Australia, and *that* was when I began to fall in love with the film.)

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Whoa. I just discovered that Ian McKellen played Arthur Fitton (the newlywed groom, played by Hywel Bennett in the 1966 film) in a 1963 stage production of All in Good Time (the name of the original play, and also the name of the 2012 film).

Was this the first time All in Good Time was ever performed? Did Ian McKellen himself actually *originate* the role of Arthur Fitton?

Google Books indicates that the play was published in 1965, and Time has a review of the play dated February 1965 (in which the groom is played by Brian Murray and his father -- the John Mills role in the 1966 film -- is played by Donald Wolfit, who previously played the big-screen general who reluctantly sends Lawrence on his first trip to Arabia), so that may have been when the play began to get a higher profile.

But Wikipedia does call it "a 1963 play", so it's certainly *possible* that McKellen got to play the part first. If not, though -- if someone else somehow played the part before McKellen did in October of that year -- then McKellen was certainly *one* of the first people to tackle the role.

(Note: McKellen was born in May 1939, so he would have been 24 when he played the role. Hywel Bennett was born in April 1944, so he was 22 when the film came out in December 1966, and for all we know he might have been 21 when the film was actually shot. Reece Ritchie, who plays the equivalent character in the most recent film, was born in July 1986, so he would have been 25 when the film premiered in the UK in May 2012.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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