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Anodos

The Book of Henry

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Anodos   

Peter Bradshaw's 1-star review for The Guardian.

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In its pure misjudged ickiness, bad-acting ropiness, and its quirksy, smirksy passive-aggressive tweeness, this insidiously terrible film could hardly get any more skin-crawling. And its periodic attempts at lightening the tone with comedy are more chillingly humourless than anything I have seen in a long while.

Owen Gleiberman, Vanity Fair

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There’s the kind of bad movie that just sits there, unfolding with grimly predictable monotony. Then there’s the kind where the badness expands and metastasizes, taking on a jaw-dropping life of its own, pushing through to ever-higher levels of garishness. “The Book of Henry,” directed by Colin Trevorrow from Gregg Hurwitz’s script, is of the latter, you’ve-got-to-see-it-to-disbelieve-it variety.

The Hollywood Reporter

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Here, the idiom of the wholesome family film makes no room for the cheap caper-flick stuff Hurwitz wants to sell us. And the compounding coincidences he requires in order to deliver a happy ending are almost disgustingly dishonest.

 

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Based on the reviews--those listed above and a few more I've read via Twitter--this film sounds absolutely atrocious...and I kind of want to see it now.

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So... we're all looking forward to Star Wars: Episode IX, eh?

 

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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NBooth   
22 minutes ago, Joel Mayward said:

Based on the reviews--those listed above and a few more I've read via Twitter--this film sounds absolutely atrocious...and I kind of want to see it now.

Same.

I can't say I'm surprised at the reviews. The trailer felt weirdly muddled when I first saw it.

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I'm sure Rian Johnson can write a better script than Gregg Hurwitz and still have time to eat breakfast and go for a morning jog any day, and Colin Trevorrow directs well, I doubt that's the problem with this film. If it is, well...everyone has gotta have their Fan4tstick/Warcraft

But really I am not worried at all about Star Wars Episode 9.

(Maybe I'm just in the minority for thinking Safety Not Guaranteed is a brilliant film)

Also I could tell from the trailer that this film was a mess...schmaltzy kids movie meets dark revenge flick? 

 

Edited by Justin Hanvey

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Anders   
3 minutes ago, Justin Hanvey said:

But really I am not worried at all about Star Wars Episode 9.

(Maybe I'm just in the minority for thinking Safety Not Guaranteed is a brilliant film)

 

I really didn't like SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED, despite liking all the lead actors. And JURASSIC WORLD is pretty bad. So, I'd definitely be happy to see someone else take over.

As one of my friends said on Twitter, how about Edgar Wright?

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That would be pretty cool. I wouldn't mind Duncan Jones either, despite what happened with WarCraft I think he has a better track record for science fiction. Or Denis Viilleneuve.

or Joss Whedon?

Neill Blomkamp?

Alex Garland?

Heck even Gareth Edwards...

Well, we can hope Trevorrow directing a Rian Johnson script will look good. If anything he's good at keeping continuity of aesthetic, so he probably won't go too far off the track of Abrams/Johnson look

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NBooth   

Let's please keep Whedon as far away from Star Wars as humanly possible. 

EDIT: Zhang Yimou for Star Wars or bust.

Edited by NBooth

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Anodos   

Jurassic World was 'meh' on watching, and grows steadily worse in retrospect. So shiny and hollow and inconsequential. Such a fake plasticky look to the designs, the CG - even the cinematography was bland. And the screenwriting was downright poor. It may be the most mediocre blockbuster I've seen in recent years - not offensively stupid or obnoxiously pretentious like some, but just completely uninvolving and disposable.

For Star Wars? George Miller... bringing the crazy like no other. Denis Villeneuve is a good pick, Justin. Maybe too heavy-handed, but it would be interesting.

Back on topic - am I the only one who notices a distinctively American sub-genre of precocious children whose gnomic utterances are a source of tearful wonder and enlightenment to the befuddled adults in their lives? I would loosely trace this back to J.D.Salinger's tortured child genius Seymour, who I found unbearable, although Salinger was a far better writer than most of his followers (the extremely annoying and incredibly overhyped Jonathan Safran Foer being one). 

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NBooth   
7 minutes ago, Anodos said:

Back on topic - am I the only one who notices a distinctively American sub-genre of precocious children whose gnomic utterances are a source of tearful wonder and enlightenment to the befuddled adults in their lives? I would loosely trace this back to J.D.Salinger's tortured child genius Seymour, who I found unbearable, although Salinger was a far better writer than most of his followers (the extremely annoying and incredibly overhyped Jonathan Safran Foer being one). 

America never shook its 19th C fascination with innocent children, so you could probably trace it back all the way to Uncle Tom's Cabin or The Scarlet Letter.

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Anodos   
1 hour ago, NBooth said:

America never shook its 19th C fascination with innocent children, so you could probably trace it back all the way to Uncle Tom's Cabin or The Scarlet Letter.

Yes, I nearly mentioned that this twee sensibility seemed rather akin to the Victorian sentimentalism regarding childhood. The aspect I find particularly irksome in the 'adorable-child-genius' strain is that most writers utilising it seem to have no clue what intellectual precocity or achievement actually entails. 

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Evan C   
3 hours ago, Anodos said:

Jurassic World was 'meh' on watching, and grows steadily worse in retrospect. So shiny and hollow and inconsequential. Such a fake plasticky look to the designs, the CG - even the cinematography was bland. And the screenwriting was downright poor. It may be the most mediocre blockbuster I've seen in recent years - not offensively stupid or obnoxiously pretentious like some, but just completely uninvolving and disposable.

It was "meh" on watching, and becomes worse every time a Chris Pratt fangirl tells you it's better than Jurassic Park.

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It wasn't better than Jurassic Park...on par with Lost World and definitely better than JP3. But I'm in the minority of even liking those two films so yeah...

 

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Can one believe in the beauty and wonder of seeing the world like a child...I remember how I saw the world and honestly miss it sometimes, and also get something out of that in my interactions with children and also understand that children aren't perfect little angel beings and some are even capable of murder?

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Anodos   
18 hours ago, Evan C said:

It was "meh" on watching, and becomes worse every time a Chris Pratt fangirl tells you it's better than Jurassic Park.

Hahahahahaha.... I haven't heard that one, but just...no.

17 hours ago, Justin Hanvey said:

Can one believe in the beauty and wonder of seeing the world like a child...I remember how I saw the world and honestly miss it sometimes, and also get something out of that in my interactions with children and also understand that children aren't perfect little angel beings and some are even capable of murder?

I still have pretty clear memories of being a child - even a very young one - and I do find it useful when interacting with my little nieces. Gives me some idea of their thought processes and how much more complex they are than their linguistic skills can convey.

C.S.Lewis has a good essay on the sense of wonder, and the important distinction to be drawn between the childish and the childlike. I'll try to find it.

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Justin Hanvey wrote:
: Well, we can hope Trevorrow directing a Rian Johnson script will look good.

I thought I heard that Johnson had said he had nothing really to do with Episode IX -- and I suspect he *really* doesn't have anything to do with it now that Carrie Fisher is dead. By all accounts, Episode IX was going to be Leia-heavy, but obviously it can't be now, so they've got to do some major rewriting. (It sounds to me like the plan was to focus on Han in Episode VII, Luke in Episode VIII and Leia in Episode IX, but who knows.)

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Based on a little googling I can confirm that yeah it is Trevorrow writing the script with Derek Connelly too, not Johnson.

And yes they did start over after Fisher died as he had intended her to be at the center of the film but now it looks like Episode 9 won't even have her in the film.

Maybe they'll shoot a death somehow for her in Episode 8 or something, but if Luke dies too that is gonna be heavy.

Lastly he is talking about making Episode 9 more a movie for the kids...so...kind of still following the aesthetic of the original trilogy in a way. Course that could come out feeling like Phantom Menace too...yikes...

*crossing fingers*

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