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Brian D

Movies you love more for having seen them with children

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Wall - E

The 2nd viewing 9 years later with 2 of our kids: I really think seeing this with my kids caused me to take more notice of what is lovely, lyrical, and true in this space dream of a film.

 

Cinderella (Branagh)

I've seen this twice now with our kids, and each time was dumbfounded by how emotionally invested I was in the film.  Cinderella as a fairy tale in a book has never come within an arm's length of my heart. Branagh's film, though, finds me swept up in the grandest of epic film emotions. I suspect I would still feel this way even without kids present, but children sweeten the deal because there are real children's hearts right next to you taking it all in ... just as if it's the first time the story's been told. Not to mention, this Dad is a total sucker for the way the 2 main characters' love and respect their parents. Why shouldn't I be? 

What movies have you begun to love more because you've watched them with a child or with children?

Edited by Brian D

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This is a great topic. The first film that comes to mind is Singin' in the Rain. I already loved the film, so I wanted to show it to my two movie-hating children. At ages 5 and 8, they remain adamantly anti-movie in all forms, but my wife and I persuaded them to give Singin' a try, just for 15 minutes. They were captivated by the entire film, and still burst out singing "Make 'Em Laugh" every so often. It was a moment of conversion for them--they became open to the possibility that some movies are genuinely good and worth viewing.

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The two movies that improved for me in recent years, upon revisiting them with my kids, are Hidden Figures and (yes) Cinderella. I thought both films were *okay* the first time I saw them, but I came to appreciate them even more when trying to imagine what it might be like to see them through my kids' eyes.

Joel Mayward wrote:
: At ages 5 and 8, they remain adamantly anti-movie in all forms . . .

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13 hours ago, Peter T Chattaway said:

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I know. It's remarkable, and my wife and I can't pinpoint the reasoning behind it--we're very open to them watching movies, and I invite them often to join me, but they are really set against it and would rather play outside or read books (which I can't argue with). I count it as a blessing, though I would *love* to introduce them to more films when they're willing. They love watching TV shows and nature documentaries, but I can count on one hand the number of movies they've been willing to see all the way to the end: Singin' in the Rain, The Sound of Music, The Music Man, Winnie the Pooh, and The Peanuts Movie.

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Speaking of The Sound of Music, that is another movie that somehow jumped from "liked" to "loved" once I had seen it with my kids.  There was definitely a kid connection to my leap in admiration, as I suddenly found the father's relationships to the kids in the film to be a point of emotional contact with the film.  The film had pierced me with those relationships, and suddenly the film was special in a way it hadn't quite been before. 

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My wife reminded me of two more films my children have seen: Mary Poppins and White Christmas. The former certainly fits this thread's topic. I enjoyed the film well enough as a child, then didn't see it for decades. Watching it again with my own children about a year ago, especially after having gone through my own Mr. Banks-esque experience of being overworked and burned out, was like seeing it anew, with a totally different perspective.

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Ah, Mary Poppins. My wife keeps reminding me we need to watch that together as a family.  At this point, I only have the vague childhood sort of memories of that one.

I appreciate how this thread has reminded me to think more broadly about movies for my kids, more broadly than, "What Pixar movie have I not shown them yet?"  The world is wider than Pixar, and time is wider than the past 2 decades. :)
 

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