Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BethR

Lady Bird

Recommended Posts

Shockingly, I can't find a thread for Lady Bird, now nominated for 5 Academy Awards (which we all know doesn't mean much). So either something's terribly wrong with A&F, or that I'm a terrible user of the forum's search function (probably the latter). But this was one of my favorite films of 2017, and here's a lovely interview with director Greta Gerwig on the way she chose to portray Catholic school and religion in Lady Bird. Excerpt:

Quote

For me, as a person who was not raised Catholic, the warmth with which I was included in everything [at her Catholic school] was deeply moving to me. To me, it’s something that even if you don’t share a background with someone, or even if you believe something different, there can be a quality of kindness and compassion that you can treat one another with — and respect. You can hold a space for them.

The brother school to ours was a Jesuit school, and one of the things that St. Ignatius said was you have to find God in all things. The idea was, you know, every person, every rock, every tree, everything — you have to find the divine in it, and I think I was treated that way. That doesn’t require that everybody think the same thing, but it does require that everybody approach each other with the same level of empathy.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw this a couple weeks ago and I loved it. Appreciate Gerwig's thoughts here. Thanks for sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great review, Evan C.

This column from (of all places) the Chronicle of Higher Education focuses on a weak point of the film, especially from the point of view of a teacher:

Quote

The film exhibits one example after another of interpersonal offenses and offers retributions or resolutions for each — except when it comes to academic cheating.

And Christine cheats. Quite deliberately. ...

In short, the cheating is not a trivial act, and she knows it. Yet there is not a single moment in the film in which Christine acknowledges even to herself that it is wrong, or a moment in which she experiences any negative consequence that would suggest that academic dishonesty is, in fact, wrong.

At least one commenter replies that Christine does experience remorse and consequences, however:

Quote

There is in fact a “suggestion that Christine should have known better,” and that suggestion is the desired “indication whatsoever that she has actually done something wrong by cheating.” Look at the exchange of looks between Christine and the teacher when Christine claims to have earned a higher grade. Listen to their tones of voice. They both know what Christine is doing, they both know it’s wrong, and they both know the teacher can’t prove it. But the fact that she can’t be held accountable at that moment does not mean that there are no consequences. It is not at all clear that “Christine experience her happy ending at the college of her choice.” She is sad and isolated—disconnected from both the university and her peers—and engaging in behaviors that cause students to separate [or be separated] from their school after one or two semesters.

I think I concur with this assessment, but the columnist makes some valid points, nevertheless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×