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Bryce

Faith based films, faith themed films and Spiritually based films

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Greetings,

I would like to take this time to introduce myself. I am a filmmaker based in Vancouver BC, Canada. Last year we completed my latest film Genesis Code which we are hoping will be released this year.

This film is a story about a man who is blamed for the murder of his wife and the mysterious disappearance of their friend and her colleague. Struggling with his own faith in God, he sets out to prove his innocence on the day that his wife's spirit appears to him. (He believes she is leading him to the answers.) This is a "cat and mouse/who did it' film with elements and questions about God and who He is.

Personally, my walk with God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit has been full and blessed. The journey has been up and down, over mountain peaks and through valleys, which has led me to know how true God's love is for us. I have never been a skeptic, as I was born into a Christian household, but have met many people who don't know God or struggle with their faith in Him.

My goal is to create and make inspirational films and where God is the center. The hero will encounter many challenges where their faith will be tested. These are stories with moral themes of good vs evil and light and darkness. I hope through these stories I will bring light, hope and inspire people to consider God and His truth.

What would you consider some of your favorite movies/TV series that touch on the Spirit of Humanity and God's hand in the hero's journey?

Is there a difference between faith based and spiritually based films? Would you prefer overt or subtle themes when watching these films?

Thank you for your time and responses,

God bless,

Bryce McLaughlin

Edited by Bryce

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My favorite faith-related films aren't about heroes passing tests, but about would-be heroes failing and God remaining sovereign and full of grace.

Three Colors: Blue, for example. Or The New World.

If I had to pick a story in which a person faces tests and succeeds, under incredible pressure, I'd suggest The Son.

If you're interested, I have a whole book about this subject.

Regarding your question "Is there a difference between faith based and spiritually based films?" — I don't know. I don't believe in "faith-based films," because all creative work is an act of faith. I don't know what a "spiritually based film" is. All creativity is an incarnational activity and thus involves spirit.

I'm not sure what you mean by "overt or subtle themes." The more a work of creativity announces what it thinks it means, the less artful it is — and it usually ends up being wrong about what it means anyway. Art is an invitation to explore what an artist has made out of his or her own encounter with mystery. We do not go to art to get a lesson; we go to experience beauty and consider what we might make of it, which, if the art is good, will be an ongoing and inconclusive journey.

 

 

Edited by Overstreet

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Hi Bryce. You might have noticed that A&F has a whole section devoted to our "top 100" and "top 25" spiritually significant films, going back to 2004. These lists give a good idea what A&F members have admired and found inspiring.

 

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On 1/26/2018 at 9:28 PM, Overstreet said:

My favorite faith-related films aren't about heroes passing tests, but about would-be heroes failing and God remaining sovereign and full of grace.

Three Colors: Blue, for example. Or The New World.

If I had to pick a story in which a person faces tests and succeeds, under incredible pressure, I'd suggest The Son.

If you're interested, I have a whole book about this subject.

Regarding your question "Is there a difference between faith based and spiritually based films?" — I don't know. I don't believe in "faith-based films," because all creative work is an act of faith. I don't know what a "spiritually based film" is. All creativity is an incarnational activity and thus involves spirit.

I'm not sure what you mean by "overt or subtle themes." The more a work of creativity announces what it thinks it means, the less artful it is — and it usually ends up being wrong about what it means anyway. Art is an invitation to explore what an artist has made out of his or her own encounter with mystery. We do not go to art to get a lesson; we go to experience beauty and consider what we might make of it, which, if the art is good, will be an ongoing and inconclusive journey.

 

 

Hello! Thanks for your message and insight. I apprecaite it. What's your book title? The Son are you talking about Eli McCullough story by Phillip Meyer's? I have heard of it.

When I asked about overt or subtle themes, there is a stigma, where the evolution of storytelling today is you need to spoon feed the audience. And this is because of their attention span. Myself I feel that it's more important to encourage the reader, the viewer to ask themselves questions about what they are reading. Stimulate their minds. In all of this I look for truth and what people truly enjoy.

I appreciate you confirming with me what you wrote about 'faith based film' and how all creative work is an act of faith. It's been hard to wrap my head around how they have created a genre now. Faith is faith. Whether it's a little or a lot. Faith is still faith. I hope to encourage growth in peoples faith in God. That is my hope. So thank you again for your confirmation on what I believe too.

I look forward to hearing more from you!

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3 hours ago, BethR said:

Hi Bryce. You might have noticed that A&F has a whole section devoted to our "top 100" and "top 25" spiritually significant films, going back to 2004. These lists give a good idea what A&F members have admired and found inspiring.

 

Hello BethR, Thank you for your message. I wanted to share I read over the list and that is what drove me to this site. I apprecaite everyone's thoughts and insight. I look forward to hearing more from yourself and others too.

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31 minutes ago, Bryce said:

Hello! Thanks for your message and insight. I apprecaite it. What's your book title? The Son are you talking about Eli McCullough story by Phillip Meyer's? I have heard of it.

Overstreet is referring to Le Fils, by the Dardenne brothers. IMDB page here: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0291172/

His book is here: https://www.amazon.com/Through-Screen-Darkly-Looking-Closer/dp/0830743154/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1517515453&sr=8-1&keywords=through+a+screen+darkly

 

To answer your initial question: what are some of my favorite films "that touch on the Spirit of Humanity and God's hand in the hero's journey?"

For a traditional notion of hero's journey, I'd pick Branagh's adaptation of Henry V. But I would pick The Double Life of Veronique, Babette's Feast, and WALL-E for my favorite films about journeys which remind us of God's presence and love in unexpected ways.

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On 23/01/2018 at 9:23 PM, Bryce said:

What would you consider some of your favorite movies/TV series that touch on the Spirit of Humanity and God's hand in the hero's journey?

Bryce, while these don't all employ the monomyth framework implied in the original question, here are some films and filmmakers which I think touch on the transcendent by way of the immanent in terms of both form/style and content:

  • The films of Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (Le Fils, The Kid with a Bike, Rosetta, La Promesse). Seek out and watch every one of their films. 
  • The films of Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life, The Thin Red Line, Days of Heaven)
  • The films of Asghar Farhadi (A Separation, The Past, About Elly)
  • The films of Andrei Tarkovsky (Mirror, Stalker, Andrei Rublev)
  • Individual films which aren't already on the A&F Top 100 list would include Ida, Of Gods and Men, Take Shelter, This is Martin Bonner, Selma, Silence, The Gleaners and I, The Fits, Philomena, and Hail, Caesar!

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Hello Joel,

Thank you for taking the time to write and with me these films. I truly appreciate this and will watch the ones I haven't seen and revisit the ones I have. I look forward to having more dialogues here.

God bless!

Edited by Bryce
spelling errors

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On 2/1/2018 at 12:04 PM, Evan C said:

Overstreet is referring to Le Fils, by the Dardenne brothers. IMDB page here: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0291172/

His book is here: https://www.amazon.com/Through-Screen-Darkly-Looking-Closer/dp/0830743154/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1517515453&sr=8-1&keywords=through+a+screen+darkly

 

To answer your initial question: what are some of my favorite films "that touch on the Spirit of Humanity and God's hand in the hero's journey?"

For a traditional notion of hero's journey, I'd pick Branagh's adaptation of Henry V. But I would pick The Double Life of Veronique, Babette's Feast, and WALL-E for my favorite films about journeys which remind us of God's presence and love in unexpected ways.

Hello Evan,

Thanks for your insight and for the links. This is great. Look forward to hearing more thoughts!

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