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Link to our thread on Jeannette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc (2017).

Links to our threads on Carl Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928), Victor Fleming's Joan of Arc (1948), Otto Preminger's Saint Joan (1957), Robert Bresson's The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962),  Philippe Ramos' The Silence of Joan (2011), The Hollow Crown (2012-2016), Kimberly Cutter's The Maid (in development) and Dana Stevens' The Maid and The Queen: The Secret History of Joan of Arc (in development). 

Link to a thread from Sep-Oct 2003 in which SDG and I butted heads over Joan of Arc.

Links to our threads on earlier Bruno Dumont films Twentynine Palms (2003), Hadewijch (2009), Outside Satan (2011), Camille Claudel 1915 (2013) and Li'l Quinquin (2014). We don't seem to have any threads on The Life of Jesus (1997), Humanité (1999), Flanders (2006) or Slack Bay (2016).

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Bruno Dumont Initiates Shoot of Joan of Arc Sequel, ’Jeanne’ (EXCLUSIVE)
LOCARNO, Switzerland — After “Jeanette,” “Jeanne.” Bruno Dumont, one of France’s big name auteurs and recipient later this week of a Locarno Lifetime Achievement Award, will roll from next Monday on “Jeanne,” the movie sequel to “Jeanette, the Childhood of Joan of Arc,” which premiered at Cannes last year. Paris-based Luxbox handles world sales on “Jeanne.” . . .
Written by Dumont, “Jeanne” will once more be a musical, adapting the second and third parts of Belle Epoque writer Charles Peguy’s “The Mystery of the Charity of Joan of Arc.” These take Joan of Arc’s story through her victorious battles against the English, court case and death, burnt at the stake.
Many movies have been made about Joan of Arc, Dumont recognized at Locarno. “I’ll try to make for a modern age an adaptation which communicates the power of Peguy’s work: He was a major thinker and poet of modernity,” Dumont said.
He added: “Jean of Arc’s story is very easy to understand. We should tell things simply so that they’re accessible, without avoiding saying complex things.”
As Dumont has said of “Jeanette,” Joan of Arc’s life story is “the story of France, its mystic mystery, contradictions of culture and history, every facet of its spirit and heart.”
Dumont went on to say that he would work with a young Joan of Arc: The one who dies at the stake will be 10 years old. He will also abandon the thundering electro rock of “Jeanette” for the music of Christophe, the 1980s French pop singer and composer whom Dumont described as one of the great singers of French music and praised for the “melodiousness” of his music.
Shooting all of August, “Jeanne’s’” battle scenes will be shot on the sand dunes of Dumont’s native northern France, Joan of Arc’s trial in Amiens Cathedral. The battles will be choreographed, he added. . . .
Variety, August 2

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • kenmorefield changed the title to Joan of Arc (2019)
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On 11/17/2020 at 5:12 PM, kenmorefield said:

I was about 30 seconds into the screener and was like, oh...this is a sequel to that other film, isn't it? Honestly, I think Monty Python and the Holy Grail has ruined that aesthetic for me.

I have to admit I find this comparison baffling. I haven't yet seen the sequel, but nothing in Jeanette looks or feels anything like Monty Python to me. Despite the oddness of its blend of artistic styles, I'd say the way Jeanette handles its themes is consistently and, in fact, rather heavily and insistently serious. It's whimsical, but never farcical.

Edited by Rushmore
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18 minutes ago, Rushmore said:

I have to admit I find this comparison baffling. I haven't yet seen the sequel, but nothing in Jeanette looks or feels anything like Monty Python to me. Despite the oddness of its blend of artistic styles, I'd say the way Jeanette handles its themes is consistently and, in fact, rather heavily and insistently serious. It's whimsical, but never farcical.

Just this middle ages setting where everything is so pressed and dry cleaned. I'm not talking about tone so much as look. 

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