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Darren H

+1 Nominations

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In the Top 100 organization thread, we stumbled onto the idea of letting every voter add one more non-blind nomination to the list. Although I'm not sure if we decided it's a rule per se, several of us agreed that this would be a good opportunity to add films by underrepresented artists--meaning women, people of color, and LGBTQI. Just post your +1 here so that we can all see it and avoid duplicates. Again, please use the official IMDb title with year in parentheses.

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For its integration of art, mythology, how view others, gender roles, and the gorgeous integration of imagery and music throughout, my +1 is Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019).

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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My +1 is not an LGBTQI entry - sorry - but the 1990s selection I mentioned earlier that I had forgotten about when hurrying to complete my Top 25. (I don't know why I rushed it. I was first to submit. I didn't want to overthink my entries, but this is one I would've included if I'd sat on the list another hour or so before submitting):

The Celebration (1998)

I was going to suggest that the topic of sexual abuse probably should be included in our Top 100, even if the church isn't a major player in this film (if memory serves), but a second look at our list of nominees reveals that By the Grace of God has been submitted. It's an appropriate choice, but I didn't submit it, simply because, while it covers the subject explicitly within the church context, the film just didn't draw me in the way it did others. I expected to be knocked out - I'm a big fan of the filmmaker - but the film didn't play all that well for me visually. I don't know that I need razzle-dazzle camerawork for a drama on this subject to work, but it helps. The Dogme 95 tactics that power The Celebration never were more effective than they were when put to use in Vinterberg's film, and the effect has only slightly diminished over many years and several viewings.

EDIT: I found a thread about the film's video release: 

 

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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From my perusal of the nominees, we failed to nominate any films from Kelly Reichardt, Jane Campion, Chantal Akerman, or Lucrecia Martel. That feels like an oversight. And yet, despite my desire to nominate something from one of these incredible directors, my +1 is Maya Deren's Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), which I watched for the first time back in February, but which has lingered in my mind ever since. A surreal Lynchian avant-garde dreamscape, it's now streaming on Kanopy.

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2 hours ago, Joel Mayward said:

From my perusal of the nominees, we failed to nominate any films from Kelly Reichardt, Jane Campion, Chantal Akerman, or Lucrecia Martel. That feels like an oversight. And yet, despite my desire to nominate something from one of these incredible directors, my +1 is Maya Deren's Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), which I watched for the first time back in February, but which has lingered in my mind ever since. A surreal Lynchian avant-garde dreamscape, it's now streaming on Kanopy.

We also missed Debra Granik. 

My +1 is

Leave No Trace (2018)

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Gates of Heaven (1978)


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My +1 is a Canadian documentary directed by a woman.

Stories We Tell (2012)

 

I'd nominate Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles  which strikes me as a major omission,  but I'm afraid I must admit, I've still never watched the whole thing... a quarantine goal?


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

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I'm thinking about adding Jeanne Dielman. We do have one Akerman film, From the East (1983). I wonder if Reichardt is one of those people who has made several really great films but no consensus have grown up around any one of them. My favorite is Night Moves but I know that one's a tough sell for a lot of people.

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1 minute ago, Darren H said:

I'm thinking about adding Jeanne Dielman. We do have one Akerman film, From the East (1983). I wonder if Reichardt is one of those people who has made several really great films but no consensus have grown up around any one of them. My favorite is Night Moves but I know that one's a tough sell for a lot of people.

I am partial to Wendy and Lucy, but that film is almost *too* accessible, if that makes any sense. Plus, while I'm happy to investigate and argue about the conflation (or not) of the "spiritual" with the socio-political, her films don't usually resonate with me on a spiritual level. That said, I could see Meek's Cutoff drawing some votes. 

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> her films don't usually resonate with me on a spiritual level.

That's why I decided to not include her on my list, too. The one film that affected me spiritually when I first saw it was Old Joy because it represents masculinity and male friendships in ways I'd never considered them before.

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I'm a fan of Reichardt's work, though I find I'm more contemplating it afterwards rather than affected by it while watching, which is perhaps why I didn't nominate any of her films. And good catch on the one Akerman film, Darren. I haven't seen it!

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For my +1, I'll add Smoke Signals by Native American director Chris Eyre. As far as I'm aware, none of the other titles deal with Native American spiritualism, and Smoke Signals portrays a beautiful and often very funny exploration of forgiveness through the lens of indigenous spirituality.

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Meek's Cutoff was on my (fairly long) "short" list, and I'll vote for it highly if nominated. I found its portrayal of humanity (good and bad) compelling, particularly in a community under pressure. And in an environment both beautiful and harsh. But I also agree about not finding her other work "spiritually significant" I live in Oregon and rub shoulders with a handful of off-the-grid-ish, "we should really blow up a dam" kind of folks, and I though Night Moves both  nailed this and (mostly) worked as a thriller.

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1 hour ago, Ed Bertram said:

For my +1, I'll add Smoke Signals by Native American director Chris Eyre. As far as I'm aware, none of the other titles deal with Native American spiritualism, and Smoke Signals portrays a beautiful and often very funny exploration of forgiveness through the lens of indigenous spirituality.

This is an excellent pick, and I wanted to point out that Embrace of the Serpent is also a nominated film about indigenous spirituality.

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13 hours ago, Joel Mayward said:

From my perusal of the nominees, we failed to nominate any films from Kelly Reichardt, Jane Campion, Chantal Akerman, or Lucrecia Martel. That feels like an oversight. And yet, despite my desire to nominate something from one of these incredible directors, my +1 is Maya Deren's Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), which I watched for the first time back in February, but which has lingered in my mind ever since. A surreal Lynchian avant-garde dreamscape, it's now streaming on Kanopy.

I picked my favorite Ackerman for the list, which fits every dimension of our criteria well. Would love to see another entry from her work. Meshes has been on a lot of our lists, and I thought would be grandfathered in, but I was mistaken. Granik's Down to the Bone fits the list best of all her work. Even though Winter's Bone is one of my all time favorites, I just could not make the leap to a top 25 for this specific list. Reichardt likewise was a stretch for me, in that while her work is contemplative it does not as clearly overlap with the spiritual and philosophical traditions of other directors in that space (excepting Night Moves). The farther you go back with Campion, the closer her films get to this list. But there is a big leap in production from Sweetie to The Piano, and the latter does not seem to land in our zone for this list as well as 100 other films would. 

Martel is a gap. I figured Darren would nominate Loktev. Ramsay has always been in the A&F orbit, but I filed her work in the Reichardt category while trying to pick 25 films. Ghazvinizadeh's work is hard to access. Jennifer Kent has such an incredible filmography, and I thought about nominating The Nightingale. Andrea Arnold's Fish Tank is a great candidate here, but we are similarly light on Leigh, Loach, and other British realists. Alice Guy, Elaine May, Joanna Hogg, we could go on...

I am considering using this +1 for Clio Barnard. I Am Not a Witch, The Breadwinner, not sure what to do here.

Edited by M. Leary

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

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> I figured Darren would nominate Loktev.

I might still! I'm being more strategic here because I want to add a film that has a good chance of making the top 100. I'm not sure The Loneliest Planet does.

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16 minutes ago, M. Leary said:

Meshes has been on a lot of our lists, and I thought would be grandfathered in, but I was mistaken.

I had assumed it would be too, which is why I didn't nominate it originally, so I'm grateful for the +1 opportunity.

17 minutes ago, M. Leary said:

Ghazvinizadeh's work is hard to access.

I wonder this about a few of the nominated films—with limited access to libraries and such at the moment, I know there are great films that I simply can't see at the moment because Criterion Channel isn't in the UK and the uni library is locked up for the foreseeable future (this latter reality is a Very Big Deal for final-year PhD candidates).

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23 minutes ago, Darren H said:

> I figured Darren would nominate Loktev.

I might still! I'm being more strategic here because I want to add a film that has a good chance of making the top 100. I'm not sure The Loneliest Planet does.

I know how you feel. I considered Let the Sunshine In, but figured that would never make the list ahead of 35 Shots of Rum and Beau Travail.


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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I went back and forth on which Denis film to nominate and decided to go with Beau Travail because, following Melville, it's such an interesting study of good and evil. In fact, it occurred to me while rewatching The Flowers of St. Francis last week that they'd make an interesting double feature. Still, I was glad when Russ nominated 35 Shots, which I think is her other masterpiece. I nominated Late Spring in that slot instead,

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I'd throw lots of votes at THE LONELIEST PLANET, but I don't know how anybody who hasn't seen it is going to do so.  I post-nominated GATES OF HEAVEN because it was the film that occurred to me yesterday that I wish I'd put on my list, but if it hadn't occurred to me I might well have put IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK in there instead.


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The Loneliest Planet is a $2.99 rental at Amazon and comes free with the one-week trial of IFC. I'm still bitter about it not making the Marriage list, so I might nominate it and spend the next month advocating for it.

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4 minutes ago, Darren H said:

I went back and forth on which Denis film to nominate and decided to go with Beau Travail because, following Melville, it's such an interesting study of good and evil. In fact, it occurred to me while rewatching The Flowers of St. Francis last week that they'd make an interesting double feature. Still, I was glad when Russ nominated 35 Shots, which I think is her other masterpiece. I nominated Late Spring in that slot instead,

That's cool, because as I developed my list I was initially adding films as pairs.  That's how I got to both SUMMER and A TALE OF WINTER, because I think of them as riffs on each other.  Of course, I guess you could say that about nearly all of Rohmer's films, but those two seem to me to be especially linked.  I also had both LATE SPRING and 35 SHOTS OF RUM as a pair, but that's when I decided it wasn't the best way to build a list, so I took the one I like better.


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