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Top 100 Nom Omits

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19 minutes ago, kenmorefield said:

Did we nominate anything by Christopher Nolan?

The only one I considered, which has risen a lot in my estimation when I watched it again last summer (under the stars at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, with one of Kip Thorn's colleagues doing the intro), is Interstellar. I'm probably a bigger fan of Nolan than most here, but Interstellar strikes me as the most "spiritual" in the way this list is describing it.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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54 minutes ago, Anders said:

Interstellar strikes me as the most "spiritual" in the way this list is describing it.

Agreed.  That's the one Nolan film I considered, too.  But I felt I'd given enough of my Top 25 noms to 21st Century films already.


To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

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I just realized that we didn't nominate any films from Jeff Nichols. I'd thought Shotgun Stories was an Overstreet favorite, and I have a high view of Take Shelter.

5 hours ago, Anders said:

I'm probably a bigger fan of Nolan than most here, but Interstellar strikes me as the most "spiritual" in the way this list is describing it.

Count me as another Nolan fan, and as someone who will likely rate Interstellar fairly high in the voting.

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On 4/6/2020 at 7:18 PM, Anders said:

I kinda wish I would have nominated The Ninth Configuration, but felt it might not have been appreciated by some of the others voting in this list (not part of the contemplative canon, not from a well-regarded auteur)

Yeah, it was one of the last films I switched out of my potential 25. It was more that I wanted to nominate something else, but most of my more canonical choices would have been nominated anyway.

On 4/7/2020 at 8:05 AM, Evan C said:

I think it would have been nice to have Life of Brian in the running.

There are several Jesus films nominated, including some I'd have put ahead of Life of Brian, but I also would have liked to consider it. I considered nominated Rossellini's Il Messia / The Messiah, which I think is really excellent and not as known as it should be. But I already nominated two others by Rossellini. I also considered Jesus of Nazareth and The Gospel of John (2003), but again there are several other Jesus films I find more spiritually significant.

I would have liked to vote on Joe Versus the Volcano and Something, Anything, but both placed highly on the Waking Up Top 25, so I was thinking maybe that's where they'd fit better. The thing is, 16 of the 25 films on that list are nominated, and I suspect some of them will surely be on the Top 100. I really do think of the lists as independent though, but some films really are better fits in my estimation for some of the Top 25 lists. I also think that The Straight Story is fine sitting high on the Top 25 Road films and Growing Older films lists rather than on the Top 100, though I'd put it ahead of the other Lynch films nominated. The other Top 25 I participated in, Growing Older, has 11 films in common with the nominees. I'm curious how many will overlap with the Top 100.

I also would have liked to vote on Three Colors: Red.

 

 

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I just reformatted the 2010 and 2011 lists, and it wasn't on either one, but I seem to remember Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven getting more love in these parts back in the day. I don't know that it's aged well, but...

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I just realized no one nominated Network, which is a pity.


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Having just finished The Celluloid Closet, (great nom, btw) and thinking about queer coding, we should have included Sweet Smell of Success and the theology of a fast buck.


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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1 hour ago, kenmorefield said:

Rewatching the Matrix and thinking about franchises made me think about Mad Max: Fury Road. 

Great minds and all that - it came down to a coin toss between watching this or Interstellar this afternoon, which made me think this would've been a good nom.  Sigh...


To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

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In retrospect, the discussion of Singing in the Rain has made me wish I had gone to bat for La La Land and/or Whiplash. Oh well, next time. 

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In retrospect, I am kicking myself for not nominating Newtown.

(We've already floated potential themes for next year's Top 25:

Westerns

Television Shows

Women Directors

I'm tempted to include Documentaries in a theme vote.

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1 minute ago, kenmorefield said:

In retrospect, I am kicking myself for not nominating Newtown.

Have you watched it twice?  I ask, because the first time I watched it, I was a blubbering wreck and quite moved by it.  The second go-round with Jessica and the kids, I was still quite moved but it struck me as meandering and less tautly structured.  I'm still grateful for it, in addressing an essential subject in the USA, but I'm less impressed with it technically and narratively now.


To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

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16 minutes ago, Andrew said:

Have you watched it twice?  I ask, because the first time I watched it, I was a blubbering wreck and quite moved by it.  The second go-round with Jessica and the kids, I was still quite moved but it struck me as meandering and less tautly structured.  I'm still grateful for it, in addressing an essential subject in the USA, but I'm less impressed with it technically and narratively now.

Yes, I've watched it at least three times (maybe four). 

I'll freely confess that my biographical associations make me easy picking for a film about the intersection of gun violence and politics. (My brother was murdered with a handgun, and the state legislature referenced that specific crime in debate later the same year when reinstating the death penalty). But beyond that, trauma and mortality are inherently spiritual subjects, and the "unnatural" nature of a child dying before a parent also forces us to consider how people respond to events that challenge their metanarratives ("I used to think the chaos was beautiful, but now that chaos has hurt me." -- Edit, despite my quotation marks, this is not an exact quote). As I mentioned in my review, I think there is even artfulness in Snyder's decision to have the talking heads look straight into the camera and the placement of the camera slightly closer (camera proxemics) to force a just-slightly-uncomfortable intimacy.

It's funny you should mention pace and structure. I asked Snyder at the Q&A at SXSW if she always knew while making the film when she was going to end it. Because grief is a never-ending process there was no easy resolution (as there would have been had Congress passed the gun law). Given my own experience with grief, I like the film the better for that, as a tauter structure with a more clear climax and resolution would have suggested to me a false narrative that the meaning of the events was found in the resolution ("See, God works all things for the good...something came of it....)Anyway, Snyder said "no," that the decision where to end was intuitive. Grief never goes away, but it slows down, and the intervals between the waves of it get longer. I'd love to see a 7-Up like follow up for some of these people in another decade. 

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