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Ron Reed

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I suppose I should say part of what makes me skeptical of that part of the argument is that about two years ago I spent a week with a loved one dying of cancer. We were (at least I was, and I believe she was) keenly aware that there was a better chance than not that these would be our last interactions on this earth, and while that added an element of intentionality to our interactions, we had to fight the impetus to make every interaction informed by that lest our relationship be only about her dying.

I'm glad in remembering that time that we shared some deeply personal works of art that are precious to each other: Season One of The Wire in particular. But there were times when what she wanted was to watch BIG BANG THEORY, a show I find no particular affinity for. There were times where she just wanted to hang out. Life gets mighty precious when there's less of it to waste, true, but sometimes it is about who you are wasting it with or how you are wasting it. There is a tyranny of the urgent that Christians like to talk about and guard against, but there is also a tyranny of the immanent. Personally I think that drive, that need to make EVERY SECOND COUNT TO THE MAX is more Romantic than Christian, and I fear that some of that judgmentalism (if I read it correctly) stems from a damaging place (or, more accurately a damaged place) spiritually.

Edited by kenmorefield

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Thinking about Ebert's passing some more -- and thinking also about M. Leary's points re: local film culture -- I am reminded that two film writers for The Georgia Straight passed away in the last several months, and that, at the Vancouver Film Critics Circle awards ceremony a few months ago, an anecdote was told about one of them, i.e. Ian Caddell (the other, i.e. Mark Harris, hadn't died yet), that linked him to Ebert:

Spaner also related the tale of the time that Roger Ebert eavesdropped on an excited conversation he was having with Caddell about Vancouver’s independent film scene during a Manhattan movie junket. “And he stood up and gave us this look, like, ‘What the hell are you two talking about?’”

kenmorefield wrote:

: There is a tyranny of the urgent that Christians like to talk about and guarding against, but there is also a tyranny of the immanent.

Ah, you mean kind of like how certain people are always saying, "Would you want to be doing what you're doing right now if Jesus came back RIGHT NOW?"?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Ew.

In retaliation to beloved film critic Roger Ebert’s criticism of the Westboro Baptist Church on Twitter, the anti-gay religious group has announced that they will protest at Ebert’s funeral Monday morning.

The church released a statement online against Ebert on Saturday riddled with vitriolic language against Ebert along with sparse details about the protest set for this morning.


"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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Ew.

In retaliation to beloved film critic Roger Ebert’s criticism of the Westboro Baptist Church on Twitter, the anti-gay religious group has announced that they will protest at Ebert’s funeral Monday morning.

The church released a statement online against Ebert on Saturday riddled with vitriolic language against Ebert along with sparse details about the protest set for this morning.

But of course thumbdown.gif

Edited by Attica

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I would not expect any less from them...


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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I suppose the question contains its own answer, but have we (and more importantly they) not yet reached the pointed where Westboro protesting you ceases to be a badge of honor but rather Westboro not protesting you must be worn as a badge of shame?

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I know that if my funeral is not picketed, my family will be greatly embarrassed.


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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I hate to even think about this, but I'm afraid that they'll picket the funeral for Rick Warren's son. They'd find a reason to. The people in charge should set up some sort of potential blockade, just in case.

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Maybe Anonymous will show up and kick their butts.


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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More "an era has passed" talk, this time from Werner Herzog:

His demise marks the end of an epoch. I’m speaking of an epoch where we had serious discourse about film.

There was a fire within many people to talk about and write about and discuss movies. All this in the last two decades, all this has irrevocably and inexorably shifted into celebrity news. You can see that in print and on television.
Siskel & Ebert
doesn’t exist. The replacement now is celebrity news. In the print media, one newspaper after another abandons its critics. They’re being replaced by celebrity news. It’s not just the invention of the media. It’s a big cultural shift. It has to do with audiences, it has to do with a massive, overwhelming trend. Because of that, Roger marked an epoch, which is not completely but is almost very much over.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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This stuff must be driving Ted Rall insane.


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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Roger Ebert and Me: What Happens When a Famous Critic Hates Your Movie.

But, like the desire to run into a former lover, the one who dropped us for the one they ended up marrying, for years I wondered what would happen if I crossed paths with Roger Ebert again. What would I say? How would I say it? And would the police have to intervene?

Edited by Nathaniel

"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

Twitter     Letterboxd

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Cause for celebration. Matt resembles Ebert in personality and spirit and discernment more than any critic I could name.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Cause for celebration. Matt resembles Ebert in personality and spirit and discernment more than any critic I could name.

This is great news. A perfect fit, I think. Very happy for MZS.


"What is inside is also outside." -Goethe via Merleau-Ponty, in conclusion to the latter's one extended rumination on film
Filmwell, Twitter, & Letterboxd

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Ebert's wife on his final days:

 

The one thing people might be surprised about—Roger said that he didn't know if he could believe in God. He had his doubts. But toward the end, something really interesting happened. That week before Roger passed away, I would see him and he would talk about having visited this other place. I thought he was hallucinating. I thought they were giving him too much medication. But the day before he passed away, he wrote me a note: "This is all an elaborate hoax." I asked him, "What's a hoax?" And he was talking about this world, this place. He said it was all an illusion. I thought he was just confused. But he was not confused. He wasn't visiting heaven, not the way we think of heaven. He described it as a vastness that you can't even imagine. It was a place where the past, present, and future were happening all at once.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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From the Britannica Encyclopedia archives, Ebert's 1978 17,000 word essay on the future of feature film.

Edited by Nick Alexander

Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

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