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Flash Gordon (2010?)


Ben
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Sometimes these 'industry sources' have the most revealing quotes:

"He has the right look, the right build and he isn't known for any one film role so he would be an empty canvas for Stephen to work with."

So basically Sommers wants a good looking non-entity. Given the type of films he makes, I'm sure they'll get on famously smile.gif

Phil.

"We live as if the world were as it should be, to show it what it can be." - Angel

"We don't do perms!" - Trevor and Simon

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How many nails go into the making of a coffin? Because this is nail #2 as far as Flash Gordon goes (the first being the hiring of Sommers). Please, anybody but Ashton.... and by anybody, I include Sam Jones. biggrin.gif

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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How many nails go into the making of a coffin?

Well, hey, assuming it's true they've still got Ming the Merciless to find. I'll give 10/1 odds on The Rock getting it smile.gif

Phil.

"We live as if the world were as it should be, to show it what it can be." - Angel

"We don't do perms!" - Trevor and Simon

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  • 3 years later...

Sony wins Flash Gordon bidding war

Sony Pictures Entertainment has won out in spirited bidding for the '30s comicstrip "Flash Gordon," negotiating with Hearst for the rights to make a live-action film.

Breck Eisner ("Sahara") is attached to direct. Neal Moritz will produce through his Sony-based Original Films banner. . . .

In the wake of "Iron Man's" success, studios are showing a heightened appetite for branded fare that could be made into a franchise. Deal comes two weeks after Nu Image/Millennium Films acquired film rights from the John Flint Dille Trust to mount a live-action feature based on the classic property "Buck Rogers." . . .

Variety, May 20

'Flash Gordon' reignited by Columbia

Columbia might be rocketing a redo-update of "Flash Gordon," entering talks to acquire the film rights for a big-screen adaptation that has Breck Eisner attached to direct and Neal Moritz set to produce. Eisner also will exec produce.

"Flash" originally was a science fiction newspaper comic strip drawn by Alex Raymond in the 1930s and was created to compete with another sci-fi strip, "Buck Rogers." "Flash" was first adapted to the screen via Buster Crabbe serials and was made into a lavish 1980 film starring Sam Jones but remembered more for its Queen score. More recently, it was a Sci Fi Channel miniseries that was seen as a critical and ratings failure. . . .

Hollywood Reporter, May 20

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I actually think Kutcher has much more potential as lead actor in tongue-in-cheek action/comedy films than Keanu, or McConaughey. He's been in terrible things, but I always thought he was engaging on That 70s Show.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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  • 2 months later...

'Flash Gordon' pace quickens with scribes

Matt Sazama, Burk Sharpless to pen the script

Hollywood Reporter, August 8

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 year later...

'Crazies' director Breck Eisner wants to tackle pop-SF-icon 'Flash Gordon' next

I asked him what approach audiences could expect if he actually gets the film made. "It's not in any way a remake of any version that's been done before. It's not going to be the camp of the '80s. It's not going back to the serials. We're looking at the original Alex Raymond strips and treating those as if... those strips were drawn and written in the '30s and the '40s, and that audience saw them much differently than this post space-age audience." That's certainly been a sticking point in adapting other pulp properties, so it's smart to consider how to handle the material in a way that's true to intent but that also plays like it's of the moment. "So our approach is, what if Alex Raymond were doing the strips today? What would that be? It's much more aggressive and intense and dynamic, and it's still action adventure and fun, but for a more savvy world. It's a much more dynamic journey that this character goes on."

Hitfix, February 18

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 5 months later...

'Flash Gordon' Will Be A Comic Book Origins Story

With the goal of making it intelligent, edgy and immensely loyal to the original canon, Eisner has no intention of retreading the same ground as those before him. Instead, he will bring the comics to life with the latest technology at his disposal.

“The comic from 1930s was made into serials in the '50s and '70s, then the director’s version in the '80s," Eisner told Airlock Alpha. "It was campy and the effects were not so good - this version is in no way a remake. Our version goes back to strips from '30s and we will update those and shoot the movie as if the strips were drawn today. It will be an action and adventure sci-fi.

In fact, there is nothing in the '80s version that can be used in this new project if it's not in the comics, Eisener said.

"We haven't that option. Anything that was unique in the movie, we have to stay away from. Flash, the characters, races ... that's all from the comics so we can use all of that." . . .

One thing Eisner is incredibly keen to do, though, is distance the movie from the recent Syfy flop which starred former “Smallville” actor Eric Johnson. The series premiered in 2007 as a modernized and down-to-Earth tale of Flash and his exploits, but instantly came under fire from critics and fans alike. The series was later cancelled after only a single season.

“It was crap, total crap," Eisner said of the Syfy series. "I watched one episode. I don’t want to look at something like that – it was a real disservice to Flash and nobody watched it. What it did was pollute the ‘Flash Gordon’ name. The series was only interested in doing it on the cheap and ‘Flash Gordon’ is not a cheap shadowy show in small, dark ships. It’s about Flash saving the whole planet.”

Airlock Alpha, July 15

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 3 years later...

'Flash Gordon' Movie in the Works at Fox (Exclusive)

Twentieth Century Fox has closed a deal to pick up the screen rights to the pulp comic strip hero in a package that has John Davis producing and J.D. Payne and Patrick McKay, the up-and-coming scribes who just worked on Star Trek 3, on board to write the script.

The deal is a long time coming for Davis, who spent more than a year nailing down the rights from the Hearst Corporation. The veteran producer, whose credits include Chronicle and the upcoming Man from U.N.C.L.E. among dozens of others, used his discretionary fund to get the rights. He also hired George Nolfi, who wrote Bourne Ultimatum, to pen a treatment and brought in Payne and McKay.

Hollywood Reporter, April 22

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 11 months later...

To be directed by Matthew Vaughn, whose biggest film in North America is X-Men: First Class and whose biggest film overseas and worldwide is Kingsman: The Secret Service.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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