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Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

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PTC, I read your chapter-by-chapter blog posts. They were interesting and funny (especially your brief reference to that Celestina Warbeck song; I didn't think much of it at the time, but upon reflection it is rather innuendish, for lack of a better term). Anyways, kudos.

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Interesting discussion.

spoilers1.gif

I'm surprised no one mentioned the Ring when discussing Horcruxes, they seem very similar to me in many ways,

-the horcrux can make people do things (ie journal)

-Sauron attempting to regain bodily form, just like Voldemort, etc

-Sauron puting part of himself in the ring,etc

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Finished it this weekend. Unfortunately, I had been spoiled by a couple web articles, so the bigger surprises did not pack the punch that they could have. Still, found this entry in the series much more enjoyable and fast-paced than the last one (and even Goblet, to some degree).

A plot quibble:

When Malfoy discovers Harry on the train in the Invisibility Cloak, wouldn't you rather expect him to take the cloak rather than leave it with Harry? I know he wanted to cover Harry up, in hopes that he would end up shuttled back to London. But I think a coniving bully like Malfoy - especially with an "important job" to do - would have thought the cloak would have been handy to have.

B

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In Harry's world, there's little of the Bible -- but plenty on good and evil

With her sixth book, author J.K. Rowling has revealed a bit more of the "theology" of Harry's world -- and his reality has never been less religious. Magic has never been less magical or more mechanical. And while there's a lot more about the battle between good and evil, that fight seems to be centered on this world rather than anything transcendent.

Jeffrey Weiss, Dallas Morning News, July 29

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A plot quibble:

When Malfoy discovers Harry on the train in the Invisibility Cloak, wouldn't you rather expect him to take the cloak rather than leave it with Harry?

Yes, that's what I expected at first as well. The temptation to

send Harry back to London

must've been too great.

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Let us not also forget that Snape continually refused to let Harry use an unforgivable curse on him.  Even with his sneering, I got the sense that Snape was trying to protect Harry from doing something that would mark him forever.  Snape could have easily dodged or blocked Harry's spell--he was reading his mind after all--but instead he chose to keep him from going down that path.

This is what I think we're going to find out in the next book:

Dumbledore trusted Snape absolutely because Snape agreed to make an Unbreakable Vow to help Dumbledore when he defected from being a Death Eater back in the day. "Help" doesn't mean the same thing as "keep him alive," however, and when he made the second unbreakable vow to help Draco there was only one way to fulfill both -- which is what happened on the tower. Snape's look of hatred and contempt was for himself, because I think we're going to learn that Dumbledore was one of the few people that Snape had any genuine regard, respect, and actual affection for, and this quite nicely explains why Snape flipped out when Harry called him a coward, because he was right in the middle of walking one of the keenest razor's edges that someone could possibly we walking down.

But that's just idle speculation.

However, one thing I found interesting in the early part of the book is the

similarities between where Snape lived and where Harry lives. At first when Bellatrix and whatsername were walking to a house, I thought they were trying to find the Dursleys, and that the dementors had caused the property values to plummet. Instead, it's Snape's house, living in sort of a bizzaro-world version of Harry's neighborhood. And both are half-bloods to boot, as is Voldemort. It made me wonder if Rowling was setting up Harry with a "gee we have more in common than I ever thought" moment in the next book.

I'd say more but I think I'm much too fond of the spoiler tag.

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This is what I think we're going to find out in the next book:

Dumbledore trusted Snape absolutely because Snape agreed to make an Unbreakable Vow to help Dumbledore when he defected from being a Death Eater back in the day. "Help" doesn't mean the same thing as "keep him alive," however, and when he made the second unbreakable vow to help Draco there was only one way to fulfill both -- which is what happened on the tower. Snape's look of hatred and contempt was for himself, because I think we're going to learn that Dumbledore was one of the few people that Snape had any genuine regard, respect, and actual affection for, and this quite nicely explains why Snape flipped out when Harry called him a coward, because he was right in the middle of walking one of  the keenest razor's edges that someone could possibly we walking down.

I've never thought of that. I think you might be on to something. It will be interesting to find out where Snape's truest loyalties lay.

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I know we have a Shadowmancer thread, but I guess I'll post this here. The good Reverend apparently attempted a joke that went awry.

Story here.

LONDON (Reuters) - A British cleric and top-selling author of children's books was thrown out of a school where he said Harry Potter was "gay" during a talk to 12-year-olds.

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MAJOR SPOILERS

Okay, can anybody explain THIS? This is from an e-mail I got a couple weeks ago:

Yes, there's an entire conversation present in the U.S. English version that's not present in the U.K. version. I don't know whether it's made its way into any of the other translations or not. Anyhow, the gist of the conversation is that Draco says if he doesn't

kill Dumbledore

, Voldemort will kill Draco and his family. Dumbledore responds by saying, "he can't kill you if you're already dead." And then he proceeds to say that they can convincingly fake Draco's death, as well as that of his mother, and take them into deep hiding that very night. The presence of this conversation is what fueled so many to believe that

Dumbledore is not dead and that he faked his own death (see www.dumbledoreisnotdead.com for details)

. Anyhow, when those of us Stateside started discussing the book online, we discovered that the conversation simply IS NOT in the U.K. version. Rowling has yet to say which version is the mistake, thus compounding the whole

Dumbledore is not dead

debate. Interesting, isn't it?
FWIW, this doesn't ring any bells for me, so it appears we Canadians got the British version. Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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I live close to Canada, but am pretty sure I got the U.S. version and I don't recall that conversation anywhere in the book.

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U.S. Version here.... from pages 591-592:

"He cannot kill you if you are already dead. Come over to the right side Draco, and we can hide you more completely than you can possibly imagine. What is more, I can send members of the Order to your mother tonight to hide her likewise. Mobody would be surprised that you had died in your attempt to kill me..."

It goes on for a little while, ending with the line from D "It is my mercy, and not yours, that matters now."

B

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