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The Great Gatsby (2013)


Clint M
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Paste has a couple of pictures.

Also, I know it's been discussed before, but has anyone figured out why this needs to be in 3-D?

I can't imagine it will add much. I expect it will probably add depth to the party scenes, make it seem like there's a lot going on, a lot of dancing and costumes to wade through to get to the people we care about. I can see the value visually when thinking of that, of the mansions and stuff-- Hugo convinced me that 3-D can draw an audience in, not distance them. But I can't imagine any really personal drama/arguments with the added device, unless Luhrman is really judicious with it.

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The trailer for THE GREAT GATSBY arrives.

Edited by Anders

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

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The trailer for THE GREAT GATSBY arrives.

It's too bad there's no period-specific music they could have used. Watch the Throne just doesn't scream "Jazz Age" for me. Although this does open the door for Jay-G Jay-Z parodies, which might just make the whole project worthwhile.

Edited by Tyler

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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Yeah, the hip-hop is insanely distracting, and the style is just ridiculous. I get that that's Luhrman's style, but the novel is so much about mystery and melancholy and longing--how in the world is he going to work that in? I am very put off by that trailer.

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Release pushed back to Summer 2013.

"Based on what we've seen, Baz Luhrmann's incredible work is all we anticipated and so much more," said Warner Bros. president of domestic distribution Dan Fellman, who announced the move with international distribution president Veronika Kwan Vandenberg. "It truly brings Fitzgerald's American classic to life in a completely immersive, visually stunning and exiting way. We think moviegoers of all ages are going to embrace it, and it makes sense to ensure this unique film reaches the largest audience possible."

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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Still trying to decide how I feel about the look of this movie. It feels wrong and right in pretty much equal measures. What I am sure of is that the Beyoncé song is terrible: dully literal (as is all the green in this trailer) and monotonous (for some reason, I can't help but think of the cover of "My Body is a Cage" that accompanied the John Carter teaser. I don't know why those two align in my mind, except that the older teaser successfully communicated the longing, pathos, what-have-you through its match-up of contemporary-ish sound and period setting where the Gatsby trailer doesn't).

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FWIW, the Beyonce song is actually a cover of

Amy Winehouse song.

Oh, so it's not Beyonce shouting "Green! Green! Green!" right at the end? I guess I just assumed it was.

EDIT: Ah. It's Florence + the Machine, apparently. My apologies to Beyonce. Song's still stupidly literal, though.

Edited by NBooth
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This trailer is apparently all that survives of the original 1926 film adaptation of The Great Gatsby. More details here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Asajgm-ciWA

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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The 1949 version happens to be online; here's part 1:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2jh6XkjrHU

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Saw the trailer before 42 this morning. I'm not sure what this says about The Great Gatsby's trailer or the other trailers I saw, but this was *by far* the best trailer that I saw. (The others were Hangover 3, Ron Howard's new film Rush, After Earth with Will Smith and his son, and a couple others I can't even remember.) Maybe it was just being surrounded by what I thought were mediocre trailers, but this is starting to look semi-promising.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Question for anyone who has read the book (I never did, but I picked up quite a bit via osmosis): Isn't there a major spoiler at 2:05 in this trailer?

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Question for anyone who has read the book (I never did, but I picked up quite a bit via osmosis): Isn't there a major spoiler at 2:05 in this trailer?

Yes, there is. I was surprised to see it, even if it's only for less than a second.

I suppose they are taking the "spoilers don't really matter for films on Great Works of Literature" approach. Technically, the new Romeo & Juliet trailer has quite a few spoilers as well - scenes that are quite suprising for the first time you experience the story. But, operating upon the assumption that you are a human being who lives in Western civilization, some plot points for some stories apparently just aren't considered spoilers anymore.

I'm not sure I agree, but I can certainly understand the reasoning.

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Beyond Hollywood has clips.

(If there were any doubt--and I guess there wasn't--these clips do, at least, confirm that the movie won't be bad in the same way the Redford movie was. So there's that. And Carey Mulligan--from what I can tell--does make a more effective Daisy than Mia Farrow)

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Beyond Hollywood has clips.

(If there were any doubt--and I guess there wasn't--these clips do, at least, confirm that the movie won't be bad in the same way the Redford movie was. So there's that. And Carey Mulligan--from what I can tell--does make a more effective Daisy than Mia Farrow)

Those clips make me think the movie will be at its best when people aren't talking.

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Tom Shone has the first review:

If anyone was going to recreate the spectroscopic gayety of Fitzgerald's prose it was Luhramann, who knows how to throw a party: here we get dancing girls, fountains, spumes of champagne, cameras tracing the arc of confetti, even what looks like a 1920s version of ecstasy which causes downtown Manhattan to go all wiggy on Tobey Maguire. It's all very impressive yet slightly boring at the same time, falling afoul of that old law of cinema that states: no act of Dionysian revelry is ever quite as exciting to watch as it was to conceive. And Luhrmann is nothing if not a filmmaker of immaculate conceptions, his film a brochure of gorgeous images, like someone leafing through a Prada catalogue, with the effect that anyone who has seen a trailer for this movie already has an unnervingly accurate sense-impression of what it actually feels like to watch.

Take Gatsby's entrance: a famous drop-shot in which Nick Carraway is taken in by a stranger at one of Gatsby's bashes, only for the stranger to let slip that he is, in fact, Gatsby himself. It's a wonderful, weightless moment, but Luhrmann botches it with elephantine emphasis: at the words "I'm Gatsby", we get the climax of Gershwin's
Rhapsody in Blue
on the soundtrack, a fireworks display erupting in the background and the sound of Tobey Maguire describing Gatsby's smile for those members of the audience without the gift of sight: "He had the kind of smile that seemed to believe you and understand you as you wanted to be believed and understood..." We can see that. It's Leonardo frigging Di Caprio.

[ . . . ]

It's di Caprio's film, no question. If the film finds its audience, it will be because of the desire, nurtured by large swathes of the population, to find out whatever happened to that nice young man in
Titanic
, before he got all scuzzed up for Martin Scorsese, and does he still look good in a tux? The answer is a resounding yes, although the real artistry of di Caprio's performance rests in the entwining of the two stray halves of his career, delivering both burnished movie star and Scorsesean wild side: listen to him roar as he tears across the room to silence Tom Buchanan at the Plaza hotel. Redford was never this roused, barely allowing himself to break sweat, but Di Caprio looses the obsession at the heart of Fitzgerald's millionaire. His Gatsby is an obsessive coming apart at the seams, a recluse hounded by the newspapers, the first celebrity nutbag — a prequel, of sorts, to Di Caprio's turn as Howard Hughes in
The Aviator
.
Edited by Ryan H.
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