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Cormac Mccarthy

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Hi, anyone have any thoughts on Cormac Mccarthy, he is my favourite author,a nd seems to write with a profound theological insight.

I would love to hear from anyone with thoughts on this.

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I'm a big fan. I loved All the Pretty Horses, laughed and screamed and became sick to my stomach over No Country for Old Men, and now I'm caught in the horror of The Road.

And by the way, The Road just won the Pulitzer.

I think there's another thread on this somewhere, but I can't find it right now.


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I finished disc one of "The Road" today, and I'm into it. Much better than "No Country for Old Men," at least in the early going. But if "The Road" keeps up, I may revisit "No Country" soon.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Jeffrey's holding back on the bigger Pulitzer news, which is this richly deserved award (mentioned in the headline of the linked story).

A phenomenal book that everyone must read.

No joke.

If you haven't read it, read it. Now.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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I'm also a big McCarthy fan. The Road is jaw-dropping. Blood Meridian is jaw-dropping as well (and so incredibly dense!). I really liked No Country For Old Men, and look forward to the Coen bros. film version. I own the Border Trilogy and will try to read them sometime this year.

I'm so glad he won.

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The Road is jaw-dropping.

I loved it. Makes me want to try "No Country for Old Men" again.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Jim Emerson goes long in his praise of the book. Don't read the post if you haven't already read the book.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Great write-up; my appetite is now even more whetted--I've got "The Road" and "All the Pretty Horses" on my shelf, awaiting my attention.

I read "No Country" some time ago and 'blogged my impressions (with possible spoilers) here. I was intrigued and disturbed by the book; the imagery of the last couple of paragraphs is so vivid that, even now, it stands clearly before my mind's eye. I look forward to reading more Mccarthy.

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Links to threads on the book and film versions of The Road, and to the thread on the film version of No Country for Old Men.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Just finished "Blood Meridian" last night. Powerful, haunting, malignant, confusing. I need to reread the last chapter; I flew through so quickly.

Would love to talk about it if any one else has read it. I'll start a dedicated thread.

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It doesn't look like there has been much activity on this topic other than Buckeye's comment from a couple of months ago. I have not read any of Cormac Mccarthy's work, but I am hoping to over the Holidays. My question for any of you is, what is a good one to start with? I was actually leaning towards Blood Meridian after reading a review a few months ago and reading some of the comments on the dedicated thread from Buckeye, but when I looked it up at the bookstore, I thought I saw something about it being part of a trilogy. If that is the case, I didn't know if I needed to read something else in order to get the background before jumping into this one. Any suggestions on what would be a good first read from this author would be appreciated.


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Though I'm a fan of McCarthy, I've not read all of his works and might not be able to give you the best answer. That said, Blood Meridian might be a rough start. Yes, it's unlike anything I've ever read (or ever will read, probably), it's pretty daunting to get through. It's a shaky comparison, but it's almost like being unfamiliar with Joyce and starting with Finnegan's Wake (instead of, say, The Dubliners or Portrait of the Artist...).

Also, the trilogy of books doesn't include Meridian, but All the Pretty Horses, The Crossing and Cities of the Plain. Those might worth starting with. Maybe Suttree? I've not read it, but a few friends have and loved it. My vote, though, is for The Road. I feel like it sums up his career themes well.

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Cormac McCarthy presents...The Home:

See the child. He is pale, thin, halfseen in his diminution. His hair flashes white, betrays his Aryan blood.

He is alone, the parents gone in the morning. It is nothing to him. He revels in their tedious wake. Eats milk and cream. Breaks and steals property and rubs himself in oils strange. He sleeps ‘til near the sun’s noonhigh meridian, his whited hair splintered and splayed like some infernal broomhead. At night he carnivals with dervish fervor, watches plays of mindless violence. He is wild and drunken, bestial, howling into the darkling primordial. There is no echo. He is a changeling.

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Speaking of McCarthy, I've enjoyed Blood Meridian, The Road, The Orchard Keeper, Outer Dark.

I've loved Outer Dark for its dark primordial depiction of the Southern wasteland, The Road for its beautifully spare and biblical prose, and Blood Meridian (perhaps my favorite novel next to The Brothers Karamazov) for its lyricism, its baroque richness, and its epic quality.

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I finally read The Road last spring, as part of a class on the American bildungsroman. To be honest, I didn't care too much for it; perhaps it was my mood at the time, but I thought I caught a faintly reactionary odor wafting off it, what with the whole me-and-my-son-against-the-world stuff.

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