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Well-Known Actors and Directors Who Are Believers?

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Russ, thanks for mentioning that. I've had Season 1 of Justified, but had to return it before watching it. I've been meaning to try again, but knowing where Season 3 begins gives me great pause.

I certainly wasn't trying to talk you out of watching it. I think it's a great show. It's violent, but the buzz about the show continuing the recent trend of exploring moral codes against the backdrop of blue collar and backwater cultures is for real.

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Russ, thanks for mentioning that. I've had Season 1 of Justified, but had to return it before watching it. I've been meaning to try again, but knowing where Season 3 begins gives me great pause.

I certainly wasn't trying to talk you out of watching it. I think it's a great show. It's violent, but the buzz about the show continuing the recent trend of exploring moral codes against the backdrop of blue collar and backwater cultures is for real.

Which I once had thought a bit boorish, but it turns out I think these shows do a valuable service in portraying many sets of morals as codes rather than intuitions or native responses.

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Sean Astin talks about his eclectic faith journey, his love of animals and his role in an upcoming Christian comedy from the Erwin Brothers

JWK: I understand that you’re a Presbyterian now.

SA: Lutheran, technically now, I think…My Christianity takes a long time to unpack but, basically, if you wanted to cut right to the judgment of it all, we were all baptized in my wife’s Lutheran church in Indiana.

JWK: You have a very eclectic religious background. I understand that you studied Buddhism at one point.

SA: My dad was a Buddhist when I was young. So, at a point when I begging become Catholic he was saying “no” and imparting Buddhist precepts.

JWK: Are you talking about John Astin?

SA: Yeah. He’s my father. He’s not my genetic father but he’s my father.

JWK: Your birth father is Jewish, I understand.

SA: He is, yeah. He said something interesting at one point when we were leading a somewhat agnostic existence. He just said “Pick something.” We said “What do you mean?” There are a lot of Jewish people in our community. My daughter, when she was 13, she went through the Bat Mitzvah circuit (of her friends) which is an extraordinary thing to behold and I assumed that he meant pick Judaism. He said “Judaism, Christianity, Hindu, Muslim,” he goes “you need community. Pick something and stick with it.” So, I think we arrived at a Christian posture. . . .

TheBlaze.com, August 7

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Paul Walker on Christian Faith: 'Who Couldn't Believe There's a God?'

Paul Walker, 40, will best be remembered by the public as the blond-haired, speed-loving, tough guy with a swagger Brian O'Conner of the successful "Fast & Furious" movie franchise. But less known is that Walker, who died in a tragic and fiery car crash on Saturday, was a Christian and had grown up in the Mormon Church.

Walker was born on Sept. 12, 1973, in Glendale, Calif., and was raised up in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but he graduated from Village Christian School in Sun Valley, Calif.

"I'm a Christian now. The things that drove me crazy growing up was how everyone works at fault-finding with different religions. The people I don't understand are atheists. I go surfing and snow boarding and I'm always around nature. I look at everything and think, 'Who couldn't believe there's a God? Is all this a mistake?' It just blows me away," Walker was quoted as saying by IMDb.

The late actor was a non-denominational Christian who in a GQ UK magazine interview talked about how his Christian education and Mormon background influenced his thinking about family.

"It's so funny, my daughter now lives with me full time and my original plan was to work up until I was 40 then reassess my life, even go in a completely different direction with things," Walker had told GQ in an August 2013 interview. "I thought at this point in my life I would need to be home with her (16-year-old Meadow Rain Walker), but she wants me to keep acting so she can travel around the world with me. Would that be so bad?

"Thing is, I went to a born-again Christian high school, was brought up in a traditional Mormon family where these ideas about parenting are of structure and sacrifice. To think outside of that idea of family and parenting that I've grown up with is tough, but also very freeing." . . .

Christian Post, December 1

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John Schneider:

 

FOX411: You're born again?

 

Schneider: Yup, it's been a while since I've been to church, but you don't get unborn again. It's been so long I'd rather not go there. I make movies about people who kill each other justifiably, and Christians do not like me that much anymore because I drink whiskey and I believe that my relationship with God is between me and God, kind of a Johnny Cash thing. I'm not a Christian for your benefit. I'm a Christian for my benefit and how I walk my walk is my business, and how you walk your walk is your business. It's kind of a box people put me in. I might have jumped in that box, I might have even built some of it around myself years ago. Things change. I don't care who people marry or what people drink. I care that people are honest and they're not trying to take something away from me that I've worked hard to give my kids.

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 I think Neal McDonough is awesome, and when he's in something I tend to see it. He and I: Last Great Day: simpatico mofos. Surely some p.r. person crafted that little moralistic treatise. And, surely, there are lots of good reasons why actors should decline roles.

Nevertheless, if there's anyone who (1) read that statement and (2) saw Season 3 of Justified, or (2a) even just a few episodes of Season 3 of Justified, or (2b) even just that one scene in that one episode where Neal's coked-up naked self walks into a hotel bathroom to rape a teenage boy, well dot dot dot. Let's just say that if your mouth was filled with food or drink when you read the statement, it wouldn't be afterwards.

 

Yeah, I thought he was terrific in Justified, but I would dearly love to know how his understanding of Catholicism informed his approach to that role. Was it OK because the rape was off camera? Is it different when you're playing a bad guy? 

I am equally curious to know whether, for Neal, being Catholic is in any way a barrier to portraying a materialist/objectivist/American exceptionalist Cadillac owner:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4wNMOapzyw

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I'm sure we've discussed Capra's and Leo McCarey's Catholic backgrounds at some length. Not sure about Priscilla Lane. 

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You misunderstand. I do not doubt Lane was a Catholic, and you do not need to prove it. I meant only that I'm not sure we have discussed her previously. 

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Just checking in, looking for an old link, and I got distracted with the rest of the thread. Is it possible this thread doesn't mention Scott Derrickson? Pete Docter? Isn't there some stuff out there about Whit Stillman? Has no one mentioned Terrence Malick?

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I just searched this thread and discovered there is no mention of Andrew Stanton.

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And the late James Rebhorn, may he rest in peace, whose self-authored obit was posted on his church website. (PTC posted this story earlier on Facebook):
 

 

[His parents] gave him his faith and wisely encouraged him to stay in touch with God.... He was...a lifelong Lutheran...

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Adding some more classic actors to the list: Alec Guinness, Rosalind Russell, and Eleanor Powell. (I'm currently working on an article about Guinness, to run on his 100th birthday this week.)

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On a bit of a side note.  I saw the LadyKillers the other day.  Gosh Alec Guinness is good in that.

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Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday:

 

May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight, O Lord, my rock and my redeemer.”

 

It may come as something of a surprise for Washington Post readers to learn that these are the words I silently invoke every time I sit down to write.

 

It would surely shock the gentleman who recently e-mailed to castigate me for the “evil” review I wrote of the film “Son of God," the screen adaptation of the “Bible” TV miniseries. “You will have much to account for the day you meet God,” the e-mailer wrote. “It is now evident you cannot write a review without your personal biases surfacing. That is not professional.”

 

My correspondent’s words stung — not only because something I had written had caused such obvious distress. In just a few short sentences, he summed up the tensions,

contradictions and fleeting moments of grace I have experienced as a film critic who also happens to be a practicing Christian.

 

The truth is, my angry e-mailer had good reason to assume I’m not religious. I don’t make a habit of professing my faith in my writing — a reticence I chalk up to denomination and profession. A cradle Episcopalian, I grew up within a tradition that’s notoriously chary of proselytizing; as practitioners of that most mainline of mainline Protestant denominations, we tend to prefer evangelizing through our lives and actions rather than showier protestations. (This shyness can also come perilously close to hiding our lights under bushels, but that's a theological discussion for another day.)

 

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Here's my piece on Alec Guinness (hope it's okay to put it here).

Thanks, Gina. I enjoyed reading your essay greatly. We introverts must stick together...separately, of course.

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Attica, indeed he was! Beth, thanks so much. Introverts unite (separately, of course)! ;-)

 

I saw that Hornaday piece the other day. I've been reading her work in the Post for years and never guessed she was a Christian -- which I guess means she's accomplished what she was trying to accomplish!

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Attica, indeed he was! Beth, thanks so much. Introverts unite (separately, of course)! ;-)

 

I saw that Hornaday piece the other day. I've been reading her work in the Post for years and never guessed she was a Christian -- which I guess means she's accomplished what she was trying to accomplish!

 

I enjoyed the piece on Alec Guinness's introversion too and Attica, I love that film. When I 1st read Ann Hornaday's confession,  I wished I could append it to things I wrote in the Noah thread. It expresses what I badly wanted to, but was afraid might seem like a rebuke. Something about the hazards of letting a single strand of Christianity become definitive and of imagining that people who are shy of explicit or public displays of piety or who move in 'secular' or non-Evangelical circles, are not Christian. Or are less fully Christian.  I'm not sure which surprises me least: that Ann Hornday is a practicing Christian or that she expects the disclosure to surprise *us*!

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Shia LaBeouf: "I became a Christian man, and not in a f***ing bulls**t way."

Per Relevant, linking to Interview.
Edited by Buckeye Jones

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In Empire this month Mark Wahlberg was saying how 'it's all about Jesus now'. I'm sure he'll be on Actor's Studio one day.

 

On hearing the man he assaulted supported his pardon, Wahlberg said:

 

"The graciousness, the kindness in his heart to forgive me anyway for my unnecessary and horrible actions … " Wahlberg told Vulture, pausing for a long time before he continued to speak. "You know, there are many things that I've dealt with in my past, and being a devout Catholic and knowing that I can't be forgiven unless I can forgive, I just thought that what he said was very special. I was overwhelmed with emotion."

 

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