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MattPage

The Phantom of the Opera

37 posts in this topic

I've seen Phantom a bunch of times now. I admit to owning a copy, as a matter of fact. Every time I've seen it, I've noticed new flaws, ranging from mild stuff like the needlessness of the Phantom's underground horse to more major stuff. In particular, the muscial numbers can get sort of dull; in "Music of the Night", the only visual accompaniment to the song is Gerard Butler walking around the room in a big circle once or twice. Big woop. All in all, it seems like Schumacher is uncomfortable behind the camera, and I can't help but think that a more sophisticated, indie director would have been able to do a lot more with the material.

Having said that, I still find the film to be pretty entertaining overall, as corny as it can be. And Emmy Rossum is just wonderful; she's convincing in the part, she sings decently well, and she's one of the most beautiful young actresses working today. I saw the movie twice in theaters just for her. :)

As for the drum machine - it would have been lost without it in my opinion. It fits the entire over the top-ness of the whole thing. Anything less would have undermined the ridiculous action on screen.

I don't mind the drum machine so much. What really bothers me are those dang electric guitar rifts. I know that it's more of a rock opera than a period piece, but those riffs just take me right out of the film every single time.

Finally - how utterly fantastic was the trailer for this movie? Best trailer I've seen since Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon.

Amen to that. :)

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gigi wrote:

: Have you ever seen "Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em"?

Nope.

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Muahaha! So after singing "think of me fondly" for the better part of last week, my colleague has just given me a copy of Phantom on DVD. I warn you now: PMSD is bound to kick in after repeat viewing.

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The Phantom was too young and otherwise handsome (as in a bedroom poster?); he also couldn't sing that well (note the excessive use of reverb to smooth out his singing).

Speaking strictly in terms of acting ability, I actually like Butler as the Phantom. I agree that his singing is a sizeable liability, though.

If only Antonio Banderas had taken the role after all. He would've been perfect for it.

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The guy who played the Phantom during its initial Canadian run, 15 years ago, was a guy named Jeff Hyslop, who used to play a mannequin who came alive every night on a kids' show in the early '80s called Today's Special. Since I used to watch that show CONSTANTLY while I was looking after my kid brother and sister, I was never able to take him all THAT seriously as the Phantom.

Then again, I will always think of Michael Crawford -- the very, very first actor to play the Phantom onstage -- as Condorman, too.

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The guy who played the Phantom during its initial Canadian run, 15 years ago, was a guy named Jeff Hyslop, who used to play a mannequin who came alive every night on a kids' show in the early '80s called Today's Special. Since I used to watch that show CONSTANTLY while I was looking after my kid brother and sister, I was never able to take him all THAT seriously as the Phantom.

Your post brings an interesting hypothesis to mind: would it have been better if the actor who played the Phantom was not a Hollywood personality, but perhaps one of the many guys who played the Phantom in the various stage productions? I think maybe using an unknown stage actor who could actually sing well would've helped a lot.

One thing's for sure, though: Emmy Rossum makes the movie watchable, if only because she's one of the most beautiful young women alive. ::blush::

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To me, and most Brits Crawford will always be known for "Some mother do 'ave 'em".

(Apologies if I said that when the post first started 20 months ago!)

Matt

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Interesting.

My wife and I will be spending our anniversary in Manhattan and have already purchased our tickets to TPOTO for one evening. Anyone have suggestions for a second show?

regards,

-Lance

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What could possibly happen in a sequel?

Christine and Raoul live happily ever after...

The Phantom finds a new Bat-cave to live in...

They all continue singing instead of talking...

Sounds like a blast. ::pinch::

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<Pace commercial>

NEW YORK CITY?!?

</Pace commercial>

Well, I presume that's what he means by the sequel being set "in New York". I have a hard time imagining Upstate as the setting. Well, maybe Niagara Falls would work.

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Posted (edited)

I'm a year late, but Lindsay Ellis (the artist formerly known as Nostalgia Chick) has an in-depth look at Phantom and its numerous stylistic failings. It's been forever since I saw the movie, but I enjoy Ellis's discussion.

[One thing she doesn't mention is that the framing device in the Phantom movie seems to also owe a lot to the framing device in Ronny Yu's 1995 film The Phantom Lover, itself an adaptation of the original Phantom novel. I don't know for certain that Shumacher was riffing on Yu; it could be that Yu was in some way riffing on the musical, even though his movie is a remake of an earlier Chinese adaptation of Phantom. Anyway, there's some sort of a connection]

Edited by NBooth

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