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Christmas: What CDs Did You Get?


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Far From Heaven, Elmer Bernstein: My wife and I watched this movie in mid-2004, and we were both blown away by the film, particularly its score. I told Sarah I'd buy it for her, but she ended up also buying it for me. Twice is nice, but we returned the copy I bought for her and are enjoying the copy she gave me.

Speak No Evil, Wayne Shorter: A Blue Note classic that I picked up spur-of-the-moment, while paging through the copy of my new edition of the Penguin Guide to Jazz (which gives it four stars).

I See Things Upside Down, Derek Webb: It's as good as they and we say it is.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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I gave my wife a two-year subscription to Paste, so I guess that may count. (I also gave my nephew a one-year subscription.)

Hey, a Paste subscription was on my birthday/Christmas list, but nobody came through on that score. I can't complain. I got pretty much everything else I asked for, most of which I wanted but didn't need.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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The high school guy my DH has been mentoring for the past three years graduated early, married his girlfriend, and starts his first semester of college this month. She's already a sophomore. They gave us a CD of their university choir's performance of Handel's Messiah. We were touched, and still concerned, yet guardedly hopeful about their future. They'll both need prayer!

My brother, who lives in Manitoba, promised to send me a compilation CD of "Payolas". Any Canadians know who he's talking about?

Other than that, our Christmas was sadly music-free. We gave my niece a "Yellow Card" CD (her request), and my nephew (16) Mark Heard, Hammers and Nails. I hope he likes it.

There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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BethR wrote:

: My brother, who lives in Manitoba, promised to send me a compilation CD of

: "Payolas". Any Canadians know who he's talking about?

The Payola$ were a Vancouver-based band fronted by Bob Rock and Paul Hyde, who went on to form an act called Rock & Hyde. Bob Rock is now best-known as a producer -- he began to make his name known with mid-'80s efforts like Bon Jovi's Slippery When Wet, and in the early '90s he produced Metallica's self-titled album; he is one of the recurring characters in that Metallica documentary that came out last year. It's funny, cuz in the days before he became BOB ROCK, he also produced a couple of albums by Servant, the first Christian band I ever saw in concert -- and I can never see him or hear his name without thinking of the Light Maneuvers album cover.

Trivia note for those who have never heard of Servant -- it was one of those Christian bands with a married couple at its core, kind of like Rez Band. The band basically disbanded just a few years after the Light Maneuvers album, but the married couple at its core -- Owen and Sandi Brock -- apparently enlisted three men from their hometown to help keep the band going. To quote John Thompson's Raised by Wolves (as quoted by someone in another forum): "After a short time the band dissolved, and the three young men, Linford Detweiler, Rich Hordinski, and Brian Kelly, hooked up with a singer named Karin Bergquist and started a band called Over the Rhine." In the meantime, Owen Brock went into graphic design, and ended up designing the covers to Over the Rhine's first few albums -- I remember being surprised when I got my first Over the Rhine album (Patience) and saw his name in there, in a NON-musical role.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Thanks, Peter. Everything's connected, isn't it?

I wonder if Bill (my brother) has heard OtR?

There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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The only music I was given was a duplicate copy of U2's latest. Pah! And to think I bought such a great selection for others - I introduced my sister to Rufus Wainwright with Poses, informed my brother of Tony William's genius drumming with Miles Smiles, and bought my cousin Iron and Wine's Our Endless..., even though I haven't got it yet myself. In an unparallelled act of generosity I bought my sister's boyfriend Nick Drake's Five Leaves Left, even though I barely know the guy.

If holiness was to do with tasteful present buying, I would be way ahead of the game. But it isn't, and I'm not...

I did get a lovely pair of slippers though.

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Thanks to BethR and Shantih's tip a few months ago, I got "Radio Sunnydale," a collection of songs from Buffy the Vampire Slayer, including Sarah McLachlan's "Prayer of St. Francis."

"The most important thing is that people love in the same way. Whether they are monarchists, republicans, or communists, they feel pain in the same way, as well as hatred, jealousy, fear, and fear of death. Whether you are a deeply religious man or an atheist, if you have a toothache, it hurts just the same." - Krzysztof Kieslowski

"...it seems to me that most people I encounter aren't all that interested in the arts. Most of the people who are my age ... appear to be interested in golf, fertilizer, and early retirement schemes.... I will stop caring passionately about music, books, and films on the day that I die, and I'm hoping for Top 100 album polls in the afterlife." - Andy Whitman

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The new U2, not the ipod collection though.

...the kind of film criticism we do. We are talking about life, and more than that the possibility of abundant life." -M.Leary

"Dad, how does she move in mysterious ways?"" -- Jude (my 5-year-old, after listening to Mysterious Ways)

[once upon a time known here as asher]

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I got the new Nick Cave from my mom.

I got w/gift certificates:

mewithoutYou- Catch for us the Foxes

Jin - The Rest is History (not a wise purchase, as it turns out. even Kanye West's appearance was disappointing. that's what i get for getting the most mainstream rap CD i've ever bought.)

Arrested Development- their first album. for 50 cents! And it's really, really good.

Charles Mingus - Blues and Roots. good stuff.

Still have more money to spend at Sonic Boom Records and Barnes and Noble!

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Brother-in-law got Ollabelle.

Father-in-law got Charlotte Church (which he'll probably like) and Medieval Baebes (which he'll probably hate).

I got Lou Reed's The Raven and some indie-CCM chick I've never heard of. And the Focus on the Family radio theatre adaptation of A Christmas Carol (at 90 minutes, it's shorter than Patrick Stewart but a lot longer than Lionel Barrymore or Laurence Olivier).

If these gifts don't sound as though they suit my taste, suffice it to say that my wife and I are both the cultural black sheep of our respective families.

Baa, baa.

I got David Sedaris Live at Carnegie Hall for the wife, but it was stolen along with everything else in my backpack...

Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

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Oh boy, oh boy! I'm awash in good new music.

Gillian Welch - Soul Journey: After seeing her live, I immediately bought Time: the Revelator which I promptly fell in love with. Soul Journey is different and in fact less like the live show that Time, but I still am enjoying it.

Sufjan Stevens - Seven Swans: I need some more time with this one. Michigan is great; we'll see how this matches up.

Tom Waits - Mule Variations: And so begins my Tom Waits education. You might say it was love at first listen. "I woke up in the morning with the COLD WATER!" just won't leave my head.

Cowboy Junkies - Trinity Sessions: This is my first Junkies album and, without meaning to sound overly excitable, I LOVE it. Really...I always knew that I like them whenever I got around to giving them a listen, but this is good stuff!

Iron and Wine - The Creek Drank the Cradle: My roomate picked up his newer album after seeing him play here in Eugene, so I requested the older one. Great stuff! It's kind of hard not to like something so groovy and mellow all at the same time.

Wynton Marsallis - All Rise: This one is going to take some work, but the initial signs are good. Symphony, chorus, and...jazz band? Yup. And it works. I just discovered (via Allmusic) it's rather interesting historical context.

Emmylou Harris - Wrecking Ball: It's Emmylou, it's haunting, it's good. The title track, written by and sung with Neil Young, leaves me speechless. My only other experience with her is Red Dirt Girl, which I rather like; but this is much better.

In fact, the only CD I requested but didn't get was Bruce Springsteen's Ghost of Tom Joad. I can't really complain.

So you ladies and you gentlemen, pull your bloomers on...

-Joe Henry

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Well well well.... smile.gif

I got a lot this christmas from my wife, mainly CCM. Was unable to successfully distract her from buying those...

Michael W. Smith - his latest

Yuck. When will he reinvent himself? Listened through it in a hurry, but it is ominously similar to his previous output... hmm.

Steven C. Chapman - his latest

Same as above. I think. Havent listened to it to be honest wink.gif

Jars Of Clay - Who We Are Instead

Now this one is quite amazing really. I would have bought it for the lyrics alone, they are quite amazing. Even if the music itself were crap. In fact, since I despise country music (and this one has heavy country influences), I needed two or three listens, but then I was captivated. Mellow, acoustic and always thoughtful, its one of my faves right now. JOC surely have something special, a certain genuineness about themselves.

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I didn't get any music, but I did buy myself a Paste subscription with some Christmas money! Woo Hoo!

mf_bookread.gif

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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I'm embarrassed to admit that, emmersed in a great new book I got, I have not yet checked out two anthologies I received. A four (?) CD set of "The Essential Johnny Cash" and a real prize, "The Complete Comedian Harmonists" a close harmony group out of Germany in the thirties on which the film The Harmonists is based.

"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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