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Josh Hurst

Films about art and art-making.

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Thom   

Exit Through The Gift Shop

Beautiful Losers

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Thom   

Art School Confidential

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Theater as art: This So-Called Disaster looks at Sam Shepard directing Nick Nolte, Sean Penn, et al. in "The Late Henry Moss". If we could tag messages I'd tag Ron Reed and Dan Buck for this.

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BethR   

Artemisia

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techne   

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During Kenneth Turan's presenation at Whitehead Film Festival, he showed Who AM I This Time? (made for PBS American Playhouse in the early 80s, directed by Jonathan Demme, staring Susan Sarandon and Christopher Walken.) In our discussion it was noted that this reflects a love of theater. It's fun. And you can stream it at Netflix.

Edited by Darrel Manson

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My favorite movie about artists is The Horse's Mouth staring Alec Guiness as a shifty, dishonest, obsessive artist. The movie is hilarious, not something you can say about most movies about artists.

Yes! The Horse's Mouth is a riot. Jimson is one of best characters ever by Alec Guinness, second only to Colonel Nicholson.

This is the fascinating rascal that Mr. Guinness has brightly crystallized out of Mr. Cary's novel—a clever conniver and a rogue, a fellow without normal scruples or sentimentality, but a gallant, heroic old scrapper for the one thing in which he believes. That is to give expression to the color that flames in his mind. And that is what he fights for through the picture and what we hope he'll go on doing at the end.

I don't know if it's because I also saw him play Father Brown, but Guinness's Jimson always seems to me like one of those fanatical/crazy/adventurer/artist/William Blake poetry spouting characters who acts like he just walked right off the pages of a G.K. Chesterton novel. It's hard to describe how just simply fun this one is. Now I'm going to have that delightful Sergei Prokofiev "Lieutenant Kije" tune stuck in my head for a week.

Jimson: Half a minute of revelation is worth a million years of know-nothing.

Coker: Who lives a million years?

Jimson: A million people every twelve months.

Edited by Persiflage

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Forgive me if Hour of the Wolf was already mentioned here. I did a quick scan of previous posts, but didn't notice this title.

Granted, we never see any of Johan's (Max von Sydow) work actually shown (other than brief, out of focus glimpses of work hanging in his cottage studio), but I did love Johan's attempt to downplay his chosen profession as something that was thrust upon him by something within him that he doesn't truly understand. Paraphrasing here...

"I call myself an artist for lack of a better name. In my creative work is nothing implicit, except compulsion. Through no fault of mine I've been pointed out as something extraordinary, a calf with five legs, a monster."

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The People vs. George Lucas - not only about making art, but to whom does it belong.

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Persona   

Some docs most of us know but haven't yet been mentioned in the thread: In The Realms of the Unreal, The Devil and Daniel Johnston, Marwencol.

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Ummmmm.... Man on Fire....

Rayburn (Christopher Walken): A man can be an artist... in anything, food, whatever. It depends on how good he is at it. Creasey's art is death. He's about to paint his masterpiece.

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Scatter My Ashes at Burgdorf's could fit this, especially the parts about designing the holiday windows.

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I'm not going to launch a separate thread because I can't go into the depth the movie deserves, but A&F needs a thread about Cutie and the Boxer. If you want to watch an excellent movie about art and art-making -- maybe about marriage, too -- that one has to be added to the list.

 

My only struggle is figuring out whether some of these shots were staged or recreated. It's hard to believe the camera captured certain moments as they happened. I don't know enough about the making of the film to have sufficient insight into that matter.  

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A couple docs I saw at NBFF: Faberge: A Life of Its Own and a short doc, Sbocciare.

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Rushmore   

My favorite film about art-making - and on a very short list of my favorite films, period - is The Mill & The Cross.

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