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BethR

Wonder Woman movie

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Joss Whedon only announced his separation from the project today, eh? (Or should I say "tomorrow"? The post is dated February 3, even though it is currently February 2 in North America. Is he overseas?)

It was one or two days ago that the blogosphere reverberated with the news that Warner had bought a SECOND script, and at the time, some people were speculating or asserting that Warner was buying this other script to, uh, prevent themselves from getting sued or something. That was Cinematical's argument, at any rate. And while I am normally loathe to quote that site, I will note that it claims the new script takes place during World War II, and not during the present day, as Whedon's script reportedly did. Since Wonder Woman was actually invented in 1941, I think this could work ...

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::bluehaironend::

Good grief!!

He's been laboring over that script for years! And I've been so eager to read his take on it! He kept talking about how much fun it was...

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Joss Whedon only announced his separation from the project today, eh? (Or should I say "tomorrow"? The post is dated February 3, even though it is currently February 2 in North America. Is he overseas?)

Probably just using the default timestamp of the blog, which is "CET" (Central Europe Time?) or thereabouts. He's not much of a techie.

It was one or two days ago that the blogosphere reverberated with the news that Warner had bought a SECOND script, and at the time, some people were speculating or asserting that Warner was buying this other script to, uh, prevent themselves from getting sued or something. That was Cinematical's argument, at any rate.

Cinematical was just parroting the Hollywood Reporter:

So why does the studio want another "Wonder Woman" script? Sources said the purchase is a pre-emptive measure aimed at taking the spec off the market to protect itself against the possibility that any similarities between the scripts could be fodder for future legal action.
But according to Whedon, the different script concepts seem to have led, ultimately, to the parting of the ways, and:
The worst thing that can happen in this scenario is that the studio just keeps hammering out changes and the writer falls into a horrible limbo of development.

He's experienced something like that scenario before at least twice, once with the original Buffy the Vampire Slayer movie, and again with Alian Resurrection--the movies got made, but he hated them.

Edited by BethR

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BethR wrote:

: . . . and again with Alian Resurrection--the movies got made, but he hated them.

At least he deigned to be interviewed for the DVD! Which is more than can be said for Alien3 director David Fincher.

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But according to Whedon, the different script concepts seem to have led, ultimately, to the parting of the ways, and:
The worst thing that can happen in this scenario is that the studio just keeps hammering out changes and the writer falls into a horrible limbo of development.

I may have been wrong about that. Another story has this comment from Whedon:

Friday afternoon, CBR News spoke with Joss Whedon and asked him what that second script meant for his production. His answer was surprising. "That extra script, as far as I know, has nothing to do with the fact that I am no longer on the project, but I am no longer on the project as of today," Whedon told CBR News.

Guess we'll just have to wait and see what, if any, movie ever results.

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I wonder if anybody was interested in this film because they were WONDER WOMAN fans, as opposed to fans of whoever happens to be attached to the project on any given day. A few snippets of Joss Whedon interviews that I read indicated he seemed to think he was creating this movie almost out of whole cloth, in contrast to the vast primal mythology that surrounds the likes of Superman and Batman. Granted, Wonder Woman has been through a few different incarnations -- she was completely "re-booted" in the mid-1980s following the Crisis on Infinite Earths cross-over mega-series -- but still.

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she was completely "re-booted" in the mid-1980s
What was wrong with her '70s boots?

(sorry, me go now)

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Har har!

But seriously, watching so many people express interest in a superhero movie NOT because they care about the character at all but, rather, because they like the director attached to it ... I dunno, it's bringing back bad memories of when Tim Burton screwed up Batman ... and I say this as one who has never been a Wonder Woman fan but who was, at the time, a fan of the Batman comics ...

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I would describe myself as a mild WW fan, and I am interested in the movie because of the character, not the creator. There are things about the WW character that I dislike, but one of the characteristics of WW is that she's been through so many incarnations that it's hard to pin down exactly what's necessary to her character and what's not. I dislike the WW of the George Perez era - which jettisoned the Diana Prince identity, strongly emphasized the worship of the Greek gods, and the elimination of Steve Trevor as a romantic interest - but I grew up on the Lynda Carter WW, and love the idea of a female superhero that can go toe-to-toe with Superman but has a very different worldview.

My favorite treatment of WW is in Paul Dini and Alex Ross's Wonder Woman: Spirit of Truth graphic novel, and in Christopher Moeller's JLA: A League of One. Much as Batman is often portrayed as a character with a singleminded pursuit of justice, these books portray Wonder Woman as being characterized by the concept of truth and truthfulness. Her main "gimmick" is the magic lasso that compels anyone encircled by it to tell the truth, after all. I think that's a fascinating area to explore in a duplicitous age, and makes the Diana Prince identity so important - how does a character justify the deception of a secret identity when her whole being is centered around the concept of truth?

Anyway, I doubt a WW film would explore those kinds of themes, but I like the character when writers take her into that territory.

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Let's just say I have mixed feelings about Wonder Woman as a character.

OT1H, her importance in the super hero pantheon could hardly be overstated. She's, like, the only classic stand-alone super heroine, i.e., the only classic heroine who is neither a knockoff of a male character (e.g., Supergirl, Batgirl) nor a member of a team (e.g., the Invisible Girl).

Also, she is world-class powerful. Although not a Superman knockoff, she is essentially the archetypal female-as-hero, as Superman is the archetypal male hero.

All of that makes her an extremely prominent, um, figure in super-hero lore.

OTOH, as a character, her personality and mythos isn't nearly as well defined as that of Superman, Batman or Spider-Man. She is almost too archetypal, insufficiently particularized and contextualized with specific local attachments, personal conflicts, what have you.

The upshot of this is that I see WW as a character with enormous dramatic and mythic potential, given a sufficiently imaginative creative context. There's a sense in which the storyteller must perhaps reinvent Wonder Woman in order to do justice to the character's potential. Whereas with Superman or Batman or Spider-Man there is more "there" to work with, more that is "given."

To put it another way, I think you aptly described what Burton did with Batman as "screwing up" Batman. I wouldn't be quite as quick to say that an equally misguided Wonder Woman film "screwed up" Wonder Woman. I would be more likely to say, I dunno, that it went nowhere, or had no idea what to do with the character.

So, yeah, I think it's fair to say that who the filmmaker is matters even more with Wonder Woman than with other heroes. "Wonder Woman movie" by itself doesn't do it for me.

Edited by SDG

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Wonder Woman script review

WONDER WOMAN was scripted by Matthew Jennison and Brent Strickland with story credit going to Matthew Jennison, Brent Strickland and Kevin Shawley. It was written on spec and was quickly snapped up by producer Joel Silver and Warner Bros.-- again, indicative of how good it is.

Oh yeah, that, and the fact that Warner Bros. and Silver parted ways with writer/director Joss Whedon ---- who had been developing WONDER WOMAN for Warners without success -- almost the second they stumbled upon this script. Or so it certainly seems. . . .

I know that some will have reservations about WONDER WOMAN being a period piece set during WW II. One can assume that the "contemporary take" on the character that was being developed by Mr. Whedon simpy wasn't working. Even though I'm not a "Wonder Woman fan" per se, the character seems to work better as a live-action film when done in the manner as depicted this script (a WW II era period piece). Hell, even her costume makes sense in respect to the story's 1943 setting.

Bill Ramey, Batman-on-Film.com, June 4

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Joss Whedon may have ankled the live-action movie, but Whedon buffs may be interested to know that Nathan Fillion (Captain Mal on Firefly and Serenity) is providing the voice of Steve Trevor in the upcoming direct-to-DVD animated movie. Also, the voice of Wonder Woman herself is being provided by Keri Russell, who co-starred with Filion in Waitress.

Whoa. I had no idea until I checked out the IMDb just now that Fillion was in Saving Private Ryan. I vaguely recall the dialogue quoted here, too. I'm going to have to look that up when I get home.

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That chick on imdb does NOT look like Wonder Woman.

(Linda Carter looks like Wonder Woman.)

(This thing is destined for failure.)

To put it another way, I think you aptly described what Burton did with Batman as "screwing up" Batman. I wouldn't be quite as quick to say that an equally misguided Wonder Woman film "screwed up" Wonder Woman. I would be more likely to say, I dunno, that it went nowhere, or had no idea what to do with the character.

So, yeah, I think it's fair to say that who the filmmaker is matters even more with Wonder Woman than with other heroes. "Wonder Woman movie" by itself doesn't do it for me.

blink

Are you saying there already was a Wonder Woman movie?

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BethR wrote:

: . . . and again with Alian Resurrection--the movies got made, but he hated them.

At least he deigned to be interviewed for the DVD! Which is more than can be said for Alien3 director David Fincher.

There was extremely bad blood between the studio and Fincher...the Alien3 behinds the scenes hints at this, with one of the producers expressing great embarrassment with how the studio interfered with his vision and treated Fincher...but Fincher doesn't even acknowledge the film in his resume.

That chick on imdb does NOT look like Wonder Woman.

(Linda Carter looks like Wonder Woman.)

(This thing is destined for failure.)

Are you referring to the one Peter just mentioned? It's animated. :)

blink

Are you saying there already was a Wonder Woman movie?

Well, there was the Cathy Lee Crosby TV movie and the Wonder Woman Sitcom from the Batman TV show creators.

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Warner CEO Barry Meyer says a Wonder Woman movie is (still? again?) in development.

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The first Wonder Woman adaptation ever -- a four-minute TV pilot produced in 1967 (at the height of the Batman TV show's popularity):

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Yeah, I saw this.

To repost something I wrote elsewhere: There are problems with the classical costume. The bathing-beauty look doesn’t make a whole lot of sense for a character who is supposed to be an Amazon whose connections to classical Greek mythology were increasingly emphasized in later development. Plus, in a world in which men wear full-body suits that cover all of them except at most the head and hands, and sometimes not even that much, why should the woman be two-thirds naked?

In the very beginning, she had a skirt, which made a bit more sense. But the bare-shoulder look just doesn’t work as an Amazon design. It would be different if the costume had been made for her after she arrived in “man’s world,” but it’s supposed to be something that the Amazons came up with themselves.

Likewise, the patriotic American flag look is a problem, and the attempt to explain it by Diana’s identification with Steve Trevor is unconvincing. Superman’s costume with its red and blue was evocative of patriotism without actually identifying him with the flag in the manner of Captain America. (Originally Superman only fought for “truth and justice”; not until the 1950s was he also recruited for “the American way.” That was also the decade in which God himself was recruited in the pledge to the flag; in those Cold War days, it was important to emphasize that we had God—and Superman!—on our side.)

All of which is not to say the proposed redesign is a good idea. The jacket in particular I hate pretty much completely. With a character as iconic as Wonder Woman, you need continuity, and the costume design on display at the website is just as dissonant with Wonder Woman’s origins as the existing outfit. I would like to see a take on Wonder Woman’s costume that takes her Greek origins seriously and doesn’t try to make her fashionable.

The first Wonder Woman adaptation ever -- a four-minute TV pilot produced in 1967 (at the height of the Batman TV show's popularity):

Holy smokes. That is one of the worst things I have ever seen. Ever.

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You mean, like this?

wonder_woman_new.jpg?w=467&h=748

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That's pretty close to what Erica Durance (Lois Lane) wore this past season in Smallville:

WonderWoman%20Smallville1.jpg

In the Smallville universe, Wonder Woman has yet to make an appearance (and I doubt she will, as Batman is also hands off).

Edited by Clint M

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You mean, like this?

She's now getting all Xena: Warrior Princess on everyone!

Okay, so not quite. But she was the first person who came to mind.

Edited by Benchwarmer

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Link to the new thread about the just-announced Wonder Woman TV project headed up by David E. Kelley.

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...and now there's news that the David E. Kelley series is not moving forward at all right now. Sigh.

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