Jump to content

films dealing with racism


Recommended Posts

Someone from our denominational regional anti-racism committee has asked me to put together a list of some readily available films dealing with racism and brief study guides for churches to use.

My off the top of my head list includes: Do the Right Thing, Malcolm X, American History X, Bamboozled, Snow Falling on Cedars, Dances with Wolves, Remember the Titans, Beloved, Life is Beautiful. I'm also thinking of Bring Down the House or something similar to discuss the racism inherent in those protrayals.

Any suggestions?

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally I like Do The Right Thing.

I think that it's one of the best films about racism because it doesn't suggest that one side is somehow morally superior, but merely shows the ugliness and irrationality of racism.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Roots is available on DVD, but it's old school... Along the same lines but a with a more modern appeal there's Amistad, which is excellent. But the two that come immediately to mind are Mississippi Burning and The Color Purple. Brilliant, mesmerizing performances by Oprah and Whoopie in the latter.

-s.

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would be very important to pick what is right for your group.
I'm appreciating all these suggestions. Thanks to all.

I think I'll likely include some sort of comment about the intensity of the films. Do the Right Thing and Am. Hist. X are an entirely different experience than Driving Miss Daisy or Guess Who's Coming to Dinner. Some church groups might be more ready for harsh images/language than others, so I'll have to give them some hint of what they're picking. I also find Birth of a Nation interesting to include. Most folk probably don't know what a problem it has.

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also find Birth of a Nation interesting to include.  Most folk probably don't know what a problem it has.

I haven't seen this and i'm sure i don't know what the problem is, either. Care to go a little more in depth on this one?

-s.

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've read that Birth of a Nation even caused race riots around the country when it opened in various cities. Not only is it Klan propaganda (based on the book The Klansman, but it was all white actors, blacks not being allowed in films at that point.

On the one hand, it looks ludicrous to see such blatant racism on film today. But at the time, the KKK was probably seen as no more disreputable than we view the American Legion or the Masons today.

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Didn't know that about the Klan in the church, but it doesn't surprise me.

The Klan was in its highest political power in the 20's, when it represented old-fashioned Victorian values in what was seen as a world going to hell. Not all that much different than the current Christian right, really, only speaking to their generation. Blacks, as well as immigration and urbanization, were seen as both symptoms and causes of the nation's downslide. They tried to mainstream as much as possible, and tried to downplay their past "extra-legal" activities such as lynching.

At the Klan's nadir of political power they were about to have a vice-presidential candidate, but he got involved in a scandal (a sexual scandal, I believe). All of his political supporters abandoned him, and the Klan's political power took a nosedive after that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In college we had to watch Birth of a Nation as a part of a class I was in and then discussed it in our discussion groups. I found it very interesting to get various perspectives from people who grew up all around the country.

I was most surprised that people thought the Klan no longer existed. Below are just 2 examples from when I was younger and my "experiences" with the Klan. Unfortunately these types of experiences still happen even today. . .

Just about 10 years ago my parents were visiting churches in order to decide where to become members. They were deciding on a certain church until the pastor made reference to the choir looking like the Klan in the white robes. . . very odd. . . Fortunately my parents took that as a hint and decided upon another church.

And then when the first family of color moved into our neighborhood the Klan got the family mixed up and started placing crosses and signes in the wrong house. Our neighborhood was under police survelance for over a year because of the Klan.

There is an excellent quote that is believed to be said by Woodrow Wilson regarding when he saw Birth of A Nation at a private viewing at the White House. . .very interesting.

"It's like writing history with lightning. And my only regret is that it is all terribly true."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An almost forgotten film from the early '80's on race, buat particularly on self-identity relative to race is A Soldier's Story. I come back to this flick rather often as there are excellent performances all around. Sadly, three of the principals (Larry Riley, Adolph Ceasar, and Howard Rollins) as well as Trey Wilson are all gone.

I was this close to "cineaste". Now I'm a newbie :evil:

"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I'll likely include some sort of comment about the intensity of the films. Do the Right Thing and Am. Hist. X are an entirely different experience than Driving Miss Daisy or Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.

True. Would your group be interested in issues surrounding interracial romance?

Some films where this relationship is the focus: Corinna Corinna (1991), Dance with Me (1998, Randa Haines), Imitation of Life (1959), Jungle Fever (1991, Spike Lee), Mississippi Masala (1992, Mira Nair), Mr and Mrs Loving (TV--1996), The Nephew, Pinky (1949), Save the Last Dance (2000), Strictly Ballroom (Bazz Luhrmann), West Side Story (1961)--musical.

The films above focus on race and include other issues (eg, widowhood, class, age/teenage angst, "fitting in", or unwed pregnancy), if I remember correctly.

Some films with this relationship as a peripheral issue: The Bodyguard (1992), The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933), Daughters of the Dust, Get on the Bus (Spike Lee)--one man's story includes a biracial wife, The Last of the Mohicans (1992), Mandingo (1975), Secrets and Lies, The Tango Lesson (1997, Sally Potter), A Walk in the Clouds (1995).

These films revolve around other issues, but include a story-line with significant implications about interracial romance.

Some church groups might be more ready for harsh images/language than others

Good point.

Just thinking online: The films that treat race as peripheral may be of more interest, as you often have to "dig" for what they are saying in regard to race relations--the future or the folly.

Especially with regard to interracial romance, we're often unaware of our biases until we're face-to-film with them. These films could generate deep discussions.

I especially like The Nephew because it reminded me that not all Scottish/Irish descendants are as lily-white as I am! I haven't seen it in a while, though, so I can't remark further.

I would also recommend Lagaan, but it's a 3+ hr musical--probably not the right format for a weekly class.

Further, it may be interesting to compare a film's treatment of Black/White or Native/White relations to another film's, say, Latino/Black relationships. It is for me.

"Things should be made as simple as possible, but not any simpler."

Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A new film that deals head-on with racism is Final Solution. I mention it cautiously because I am involved in the project and don't want to use the forum commercially in any way.

If you want to know more I can supply the URL for the official site, but it is essentially the true story of a white South African who proposed a Hitler-esque "solution" in his country. A girl, a pastor and two books changed the course of his life.

(It has become one of the most honored 'Christian films' of recent memory, featured at 10 film fests and winning 6 awards. It was discussed briefly on the old board... SDG was very kind in his remarks.)

-tw

"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would your group be interested in issues surrounding interracial romance?
I really was not very precise about the focus of all this (I'm still seeking to get the parameters from the committee). But the focus of the committee I'm doing this for is systemic racism, not so much prejudice, but the way that racism is woven (often below our conscious levels) into everyday life. A film on interracial romance could aid in seeing that, and I'll probably include something of that nature in the list.

Further, it may be interesting to compare a film's treatment of Black/White or Native/White relations to another film's, say, Latino/Black relationships. It is for me.
It is even interesting to see the dynamics within an anti-racism committee between different peoples of color.
A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

HJRoho wrote:

: The Klan was in its highest political power in the 20's . . .

Indeed, Birth of a Nation, which came out some time around 1915, is often credited with sparking a REVIVAL of the Klan.

Darrel Manson wrote:

: But the focus of the committee I'm doing this for is systemic racism, not

: so much prejudice, but the way that racism is woven (often below our

: conscious levels) into everyday life.

Care to flesh this out more? I assume you're not just referring to statistical inequities, like the fact that most of the corner stores in my neck of the woods are run by people of South Asian descent, or the fact that a disproportionately high number of Hollywood executives are Jewish.

BTW, I'm kinda surprised that you would say most people are not aware that there is a problem with racism in Birth of a Nation. It seems to me that the fact that there is a problem with racism in that film is just about the ONLY thing people know about that film. I don't think I have ever, ever seen that film discussed in the popular press without some reference to the racial issues involved in that film; typically, some people will attack it for being very, very racist (because it is anti-Negro), while others will give it a qualified defense and say that it is only partly racist (because it is not anti-Negro, but only anti-miscegenation), but the discourse around that film is ALWAYS about race.

Tangent: One film I would love to see re-issued on DVD, though I doubt Disney will ever have the guts to do so, is Song of the South.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Darrel Manson wrote:

: But the focus of the committee I'm doing this for is systemic racism, not

: so much prejudice, but the way that racism is woven (often below our

: conscious levels) into everyday life.

Care to flesh this out more? I assume you're not just referring to statistical inequities, like the fact that most of the corner stores in my neck of the woods are run by people of South Asian descent, or the fact that a disproportionately high number of Hollywood executives are Jewish.

We work with the idea that racism and prejudice are not synonymous. Racism is about power. When the power structures back up and embody racial biases, it is racism. Under that understanding, bigotry in the hands of the powerless is not racism (thus "reverse racism", while it can be wrong is really not racism in itself ). This is a difficult concept to buy and to sell, but it does have merit.

BTW, I'm kinda surprised that you would say most people are not aware that there is a problem with racism in Birth of a Nation. It seems to me that the fact that there is a problem with racism in that film is just about the ONLY thing people know about that film. I don't think I have ever, ever seen that film discussed in the popular press without some reference to the racial issues involved in that film; typically, some people will attack it for being very, very racist (because it is anti-Negro), while others will give it a qualified defense and say that it is only partly racist (because it is not anti-Negro, but only anti-miscegenation), but the discourse around that film is ALWAYS about race.
I think veryfew people actually have heard of Birth of a Nation at all, so they have no idea that what many cite as the first full length movie had such a message. I expect most people think of the silent era as Charlie Chaplin and the Keystone Kops -- nothing but fluff. (Actually, Chaplin isn't fluff, but I expect many people only see his schtick, not the serious side.)
A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd add in "The Vernon Johns story", which is a bout a civil rights campaigner (James Earl Jones) before Martin Luther King's time. I saw this late one nightt a few years ago and it blew me away. It was a long time ago, perhaps I was just naive - who knows?

Matt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd add in "The Vernon Johns story", which is a bout a civil rights campaigner (James Earl Jones) before Martin Luther King's time. I saw this late one nightt a few years ago and it blew me away. It was a long time ago, perhaps I was just naive - who knows?
I remember that film. Johns was, IIRC, pastor at Dexter Ave. Baptist Church prior to King. A couple nights ago we watched Boycott, an HBO movie about the Birmingham bus boycott. It made reference to King's predecessor being fired for his activism.
A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My brother just watched Birth of A Nation the other day, which led to a very interesting dinner conversation about whether or not there can be value in art that depicts or is in some way supportive of evil. Of course the conversation led to Eminem, and my mother restating her dislike of him, and my argument that he is non-the-less a talented rapper, but of course that's another topic altogether.

I'm gonna have to check out Birth of A Nation soon, however lately I haven't been in the mood for a 3 hour silent film.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Darrel Manson wrote:

: : : But the focus of the committee I'm doing this for is systemic racism,

: : : not so much prejudice, but the way that racism is woven (often below

: : : our conscious levels) into everyday life.

: :

: : Care to flesh this out more? I assume you're not just referring to

: : statistical inequities, like the fact that most of the corner stores in my

: : neck of the woods are run by people of South Asian descent, or the fact

: : that a disproportionately high number of Hollywood executives are Jewish.

:

: We work with the idea that racism and prejudice are not synonymous.

: Racism is about power. When the power structures back up and embody

: racial biases, it is racism. Under that understanding, bigotry in the hands

: of the powerless is not racism (thus "reverse racism", while it can be

: wrong is really not racism in itself ).

Sorry, this just sounds muddled. When you say, "When the power structures back up and embody racial biases, it is racism," what do you mean? If "racism" is a backed-up and embodied "racial bias", but it is not a "prejudice", then what, exactly, is it? How can there be a "bias" without "prejudice"? Is the "bias" you're referring to just a descriptive abstraction, like the fact that there is a disproportionately high number of Jewish Hollywood executives, or is it a matter of prescriptive prejudice, as it would be if someone said, "Hollywood executives should be Jewish"? If, as I suspect, it is only a descriptive abstraction, then is this supposed to be a problem? And if it is a problem, is the solution then to encourage prescriptive prejudice (a la affirmative action programs and "bigotry in the hands of the powerless" -- perhaps we Goyim should be agitating for more power in Hollywood)?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, this just sounds muddled. When you say, "When the power structures back up and embody racial biases, it is racism," what do you mean? If "racism" is a backed-up and embodied "racial bias", but it is not a "prejudice", then what, exactly, is it? How can there be a "bias" without "prejudice"? Is the "bias" you're referring to just a descriptive abstraction, like the fact that there is a disproportionately high number of Jewish Hollywood executives, or is it a matter of prescriptive prejudice, as it would be if someone said, "Hollywood executives should be Jewish"? If, as I suspect, it is only a descriptive abstraction, then is this supposed to be a problem? And if it is a problem, is the solution then to encourage prescriptive prejudice (a la affirmative action programs and "bigotry in the hands of the powerless" -- perhaps we Goyim should be agitating for more power in Hollywood)?

Let me use as an example Driving Miss Daisy which I just roughted out an example of a film study guide for the committee to look at. Early in the film, when Hoke (the Freeman character) is first meeting Boolie (Aykroyd) about the job, he says he prefers to work for Jews. "Lots of people say their cheap, but don't be saying none of that around me" [approximate quote]. Is the prejudice that Hoke has (or at least echoes) racism if he has no power?

The only real overt racism we find in the story is when they are on a trip to Alabama and the police check the registration and Hoke's license (a DWB scene). When they are done checking the paper work, the officer politely thanks Daisy, but says nothing to Hoke. As Hoke drives off, one officer says to the other, "An old nigger [sic] and an old Jew woman taking off down the road together. That is one sorry sight."

But there is much more underlying racism in the film. Hoke's shuck and jive submissiveness reflects the way he is expected to act around white folk. At a couple places, Daise says to Boolie that she isn't prejudice. This may be open to debate, but could it be true and she still be racist through her participation in he racist society of which she is a part? She may not consciously be racist, but she has the advantages that come from a racist system.

One of the exercises done when the committee goes to churches is to make people think about how often their race comes into play in daily life. Most white folk don't have any idea how often that happens for people of color. I don't have to think about being white in this culture. I never get pulled over by racial profiling.

The focus of the approach used by the committee is not to focus on what we think about people of other cultures. We will have preconcieved ideas that may or may not be true. In time we'll likely learn what is and isn't true if we get to know people. Rather the focus is on the institutionalization of bias within the power structure of society that maintains inequality.

To some extent, I think this is the liberal guilt thing. And being a fairly liberal denomination, that seems appropriate. But being able to name it as liberal guilt, doesn't make it any less real.

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Darrel Manson wrote:

: Let me use as an example Driving Miss Daisy which I just roughted out

: an example of a film study guide for the committee to look at. Early in

: the film, when Hoke (the Freeman character) is first meeting Boolie

: (Aykroyd) about the job, he says he prefers to work for Jews. "Lots of

: people say their cheap, but don't be saying none of that around me"

: [approximate quote]. Is the prejudice that Hoke has (or at least echoes)

: racism if he has no power?

It's racial profiling, but it's not necessarily racist; either way, though, the question of his power or lack thereof simply doesn't enter into it.

: At a couple places, Daise says to Boolie that she isn't prejudice. This

: may be open to debate, but could it be true and she still be racist

: through her participation in he racist society of which she is a part? She

: may not consciously be racist, but she has the advantages that come

: from a racist system.

Having the advantages doesn't make her a racist, though; for one thing, it is not she who gave herself those advantages, but someone else. One might ask whether Saint Paul was, I dunno, a racist or classist or culturist or something just because he made use of the privileges that came with his Roman citizenship every now and then.

: Most white folk don't have any idea how often that happens for people of

: color. I don't have to think about being white in this culture.

Very true -- nor do I.

: I never get pulled over by racial profiling.

Which is not to say that racial profiling isn't justified or doesn't work. One could almost consider racial profiling a responsible use of one's resources, and thus a form of good stewardship. There is, after all, a huge difference between racial profiling, in which the cop is more likely to check one group of people for drugs and weapons than other groups of people because statistics have shown that the first group of people are more likely to have the drugs and weapons, and something truly unjust, like throwing people in jail just because of the colour of their skin. But having said all that, yes, I can definitely see how being a member of the profiled race would definitely be uncomfortable and upsetting.

: Rather the focus is on the institutionalization of bias within the power

: structure of society that maintains inequality.

And I frankly have no idea what that means. There are a lot of Jews in Hollywood, and since it's who you know and not what you know that tends to get you work, I expect that Jews will continue to have a statistical advantage over non-Jews there. But since there is no rule requiring Hollywood executives to be Jewish, I do not see this as an "institutionalized bias" -- it's just the way the demographics have gone.

: To some extent, I think this is the liberal guilt thing.

I suspect so, yup. But I suspect there is also a certain liberal-moral-superiority thing involved in this too, and it has the odd effect whereby supposedly anti-racist white liberals start making basically racist arguments, like when Maureen Dowd recently got upset with Clarence Thomas for failing to support affirmative action. Dowd, being the liberal white woman she is, assumed that affirmative action had helped Clarence Thomas to get where he is, so how dare that black man be so ungrateful as to vote against affirmative action. The irony of this somehow never occurred to her -- to wit, so long as affirmative action exists, and so long as the accomplishments of black people are understood as a gift bestowed to them by white people and not as something that black people accomplish for themselves, white liberals like her will continue to assume that they can tell black people like Clarence Thomas what to do with themselves.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

: At a couple places, Daise says to Boolie that she isn't prejudice. This

: may be open to debate, but could it be true and she still be racist

: through her participation in he racist society of which she is a part? She

: may not consciously be racist, but she has the advantages that come

: from a racist system.

Having the advantages doesn't make her a racist, though; for one thing, it is not she who gave herself those advantages, but someone else. One might ask whether Saint Paul was, I dunno, a racist or classist or culturist or something just because he made use of the privileges that came with his Roman citizenship every now and then.

Let's see if this clears things. The goal is not to make people lose their prejudices and biases (although when that happens as a biproduct it is worth celebrating). The goal is to find ways to make our culture non-racist (using the bias+power understanding).

Which is not to say that racial profiling isn't justified or doesn't work. One could almost consider racial profiling a responsible use of one's resources, and thus a form of good stewardship. There is, after all, a huge difference between racial profiling, in which the cop is more likely to check one group of people for drugs and weapons than other groups of people because statistics have shown that the first group of people are more likely to have the drugs and weapons, and something truly unjust, like throwing people in jail just because of the colour of their skin. But having said all that, yes, I can definitely see how being a member of the profiled race would definitely be uncomfortable and upsetting.

But it is essentially unjust. To pick someone out of a line because they are statistically (or presumed to be statistically) more likely to be be guilty of something puts the onus of guilt on them because of race until they prove themselves innocent. Whereas, I can go through life in this culture with the presumption of innocence. Racial profiling is in essence saying that skin color is prima facie evidence that warrants investigation.

And I frankly have no idea what that means. There are a lot of Jews in Hollywood, and since it's who you know and not what you know that tends to get you work, I expect that Jews will continue to have a statistical advantage over non-Jews there. But since there is no rule requiring Hollywood executives to be Jewish, I do not see this as an "institutionalized bias" -- it's just the way the demographics have gone.

I think Jews are far less influencial in Hollywood than they once were because of the humongous corporate ownership involved now. Even at that, the power of a Hollywood executive is limited to that particular milieu, not something built into society itself. I expect during the golden age, there was some anti-goyim activity. Does it constitute racism? One one level, probably so, but on the level of Jews being outsiders and persecuted themselves in a variety of ways (which led many to go west into this new industry) means that they really didn't have power.

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Darrel Manson wrote:

: Let's see if this clears things. The goal is not to make people lose their

: prejudices and biases (although when that happens as a biproduct it is

: worth celebrating). The goal is to find ways to make our culture

: non-racist (using the bias+power understanding).

But first you would have to convince me that "our culture" (as opposed to individuals or specific groups within the culture) IS "racist" (whatever that means).

: But it is essentially unjust. To pick someone out of a line because they

: are statistically (or presumed to be statistically) more likely to be be

: guilty of something puts the onus of guilt on them because of race until

: they prove themselves innocent. Whereas, I can go through life in this

: culture with the presumption of innocence.

Not quite. There is no "onus of guilt" on someone who is merely picked out of a line to be investigated, whether that person is you or someone else. It is presumed in BOTH cases that the person is innocent, until and unless the cops find evidence that might prove the person guilty. If cops engage in racial profiling, it is because they have good reason to believe that they are more likely to find such evidence on some people than on others. But until and unless they find that evidence, the person in question is presumed innocent.

: Racial profiling is in essence saying that skin color is prima facie

: evidence that warrants investigation.

*shrug* All I know is that, when cops racially profile, the drug busts go up, and when they don't, the drug busts go down. Now, I think the war on drugs is a colossal waste of time and money and resources anyway, so perhaps it's okay to fight that particular war with one hand tied behind our backs. But in other areas, like terrorism and airplane security, it's just insane to pretend that everyone is equally likely to be one of the bad guys. Saving lives is more important than maintaining a shallow pretense of "fairness" that doesn't really convince anybody of anything.

: One one level, probably so, but on the level of Jews being outsiders and

: persecuted themselves in a variety of ways (which led many to go west

: into this new industry) means that they really didn't have power.

Exactly my point -- everyone can play the "I'm a victim" game if they just shift the perspectives around a bit. So I think it is very, very dangerous to say that "racism" ceases to be "racism" when the prejudice is held by a supposedly "powerless" person.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

In my opinion, all of the "Star Wars" films are deeply rooted in issues that emerge from racism. For God's sake...they're called STORM TROOPERS! Ring any bells? The Empire was all about uniformity and a singular race and rule. The rebellion was made up of every race. Watch these films (if you can stomach the new ones) with racism in mind. I think you'll see my point.

Luke (Renner...NOT Skywalker)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...