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New PETRA album


Tim Willson
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Don't know if any of you care, but found this announcement of a new PETRA album interesting (particularly about Hartman and Furler). The received email is pasted below, just FYI.

Anyone curious about this? Or do you include Petra in the CCM=mediocre category? Petra was getting old before I discovered them, but I remember thinking when it came out that "Graverobber" was an amazing rock song...

Tim

---------------------------

Admit it. You used to love Petra. You still want to "Beat the System"

and thrill to the battle cry of "This Means War," and you love to pull

out the ground-breaking albums that made Petra synonymous with rock

music for Christians everywhere. It might even mean dusting off an old

cassette player or even a turntable, but those were the days of great

Petra albums. But something's been missing for the last few years - an

energy, an audacity. You thought maybe they were getting old.

Not so. They just needed the freedom to cut loose. Returning as a

force with their twentieth album, Jekyll and Hyde, Petra has proven that

they not only still know how to rock, but are prepared to shake up the

system. With founding member Bob Hartman back in the band to provide

blistering guitar tracks alongside the innovative drumming of Newsboys'

Peter Furler, who also acts as producer, Petra has at last provided an

album that will satisfy its longstanding fans and ignite new ones. On

the band's most aggressive record of its thirty-year career, Petra is as

fresh, fiery and innovative as ever, demonstrating once again the

musical leadership that has brought them multiple GRAMMY and Dove Award

wins, and helped them sell over 7 million records. Now, just as it has since 1972, Petra Means Rock.

Go now to give a listen to Jekyll and Hyde

http://www.buzzplant.com/petra/

"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

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: Admit it. You used to love Petra. You still want to "Beat the System" and

: thrill to the battle cry of "This Means War," . . .

I had already moved past Petra, and they had already begun to seem old to me, by the time This Means War (198?) came out. I have fond memories of Not of This World (1983), though -- it was one of the first albums I owned, and I learned how to play a number of the band's songs thanks to a songbook that covered most of their tunes up to More Power to Ya (1982).

: They just needed the freedom to cut loose. Returning as a force with

: their twentieth album, Jekyll and Hyde, Petra has proven that they not

: only still know how to rock, but are prepared to shake up the system.

And apparently they started by shaking up the band's membership and cutting loose their longtime drummer, Louie Weaver.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I saw Petra in concert once, in April 1985, on the Beat the System tour (which would eventually be immortalized in their live album, which I think was called Caught in Time and Space ... and the fact that I did not get this album was the beginning of the end of my thing for Petra). That was back when Greg Volz was still with the band. As for John Schlitt, I saw him do a solo gig once at a woefully underpopulated event in 1996 called Soulfest, and I felt bad for him that there were so few people there and they were sitting so far back from the stage; at one point, he asked people to move closer, because he felt like he was singing "in another county!" (Canadians don't have counties, but we got the point.) (FWIW, the headlining act at Soulfest was Sixpence None the Richer, and I spoke to Leigh Nash backstage VERY briefly, but she was so obviously jet-lagged I didn't bother saying much more than "hi" and "bye". This was obviously WAY before 'Kiss Me' made them a Big Thing.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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The sad thing about the new Petra CD is that it reportedly doesn't live up to the hype. Fellow on another list got an advance copy of the single and played it for his non-Christian coworkers, who universally appraised it as cheesy.

Petra's most aggressive album, in terms of the songwriting and guitar work, was Never Say Die--"Coloring Song" and "For Annie" notwithstanding. It's too bad that the production is several dozen decibels short of a real rock album. I think they had the material for one, but the Christian market wouldn't have been ready for the sound. As far as I'm concerned it's been downhill ever since -- and what a long hill that has turned out to be.

Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

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I loved Petra as a teen and young believer in Christ, finding nourishment in their lyrics and enjoying the cool keyboards in 'Not of This World' and 'Beat the System.' I progressively lost interest in the band, once John Schlitt came on board.

I'm surprised that Louie Weaver's website mentions John Schlitt as the instrumental one in his firing; I always thought of Bob Hartman as Petra's mover and shaker, given his participation from the first album and his writing credits on just about every Petra song I heard.

To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

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What slight interest I had in the band withered completely when Greg Volz left. His voice was the only thing that seemed very distinct about their work. They just kinda filled that blank in the Christian genre, the alternative to bands like Journey and Boston and, oh, well, no they were never really a Van Halen. I remember being somewhat fond of a few "Beat the System" songs, but the songs came across as mini-sermons-for-youth-groups rather than anything particularly poetic.

Volz's first solo album "The River is Rising" was as strong or stronger than as any Petra albums I ever heard, but by that time I was beginning to lose interest in "Christian rock" and wanted to hear artists addressing topics other than the usual Christian menu of A) saving lost souls, cool.gif the coming apocalypse, C) no sex before marriage, D) Jesus loves me, etc.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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