Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Great news, Darrel! Thanks for sharing.

Which comic strips do you read on a regular basis? The Hamakers like:

(in The Washington Post)

Zits

Prickly City

Frazz

Close to Home

Baby Blues

(in The Washington Times)

Grand Avenue

Interesting to note that three of our Post favorites used to appear in the Times, but the Post stole 'em away.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to post
Share on other sites

How many Calvin & Hobbes fans know the significance of the two "sample" strips at that link?

The Greydanuses are fans of Zits and Baby Blues as well. For Better or For Worse used to be a favorite, until it got bogged down in tendentious, tiresome Canadian political correctness. (The adorable "special needs" girl and the "exotic" native North Americans, where every punchline is ha ha, we're just like everybody else, made me want to vomit. However, the current run featuring the annoying childless couple has been better than average.)

On a related note, in the absence of Calvin & Hobbes, Non Sequitur is far and away the most gorgeously illustrated strip gracing the Sunday comics page -- if only the writing weren't so stupefyingly smug and condescending as to make Rush Limbaugh and Michael Moore look like models of reasonable discourse.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't get a paper right now, but my favorite strips recently have been:

Foxtrot

Jump Start

Non Sequitur (I think that's the name of it - it's by Wiley?)

In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."
Link to post
Share on other sites

DanBuck, you got it. Those are the first and last C&H strips ever published.

Crimson, yes on Jump Start (very nice, except that some of the "kid's world" strips can be a little tiresome) and Fox Trot (except that the "idiot father" thing was old, like, 20 years ago). On Non Sequitur, I commented above...

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to post
Share on other sites

Missed your post somehow, SDG! Yeah, Wiley can be smug, but that's his schtick - he pokes holes in EVERYONE'S self-righteousness, and winds up being self-righteous himself. But he's FUNNY, and he draws a gorgeous strip, as you say. So I'll put up with a little smugness.

In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."
Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to LOOK AT Non Sequitur on Sundays, especially since he began this "Ordinary Basil" run. It is so beautiful to look at, and like I said there's nothing remotely in that league since Watterson left. Ideally, I don't read it at all.

There are other comic strips I make a point of not reading. Funky Winkerbean has become one of these. My wife and I have a saying: "Stop me before I Funky again!" That run where Funky was in recovery from alcoholism was so dreadful, I wanted to write to Tom Batiuk (which by the way how DO you pronounce that last name? We say it Batty-uk, which we know is wrong but we say it that way anyhow) and say "Oh my God, please can Funky just crawl back into the bottle and stay there, he's totally insufferable when he's in 'recovery.'"

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite strips are: Zits, Frazz, Rhymes with Orange, Boondocks, La Cucaracha, Get Fuzzy. (I used to have a Satchel cursor on my computer.)

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Link to post
Share on other sites

Zits, BC, Calvin and Hobbes, Foxtrot. Every now and then I like Dilbert. Today's Zits was hilarious, as I've been pestering my folks for a new cell phone for my birthday.

Subtlety is underrated
Link to post
Share on other sites
DanBuck, you got it. Those are the first and last C&H strips ever published.

Well, I don't know about the books, but if your talking about strips published for syndication then you're half right. Yes, the black & white was the first one published. However, the strip below was actually the last original C&H to grace any newspaper's Comics section, published on December 31, 1995.

Quite fitting too.

[attachmentid=239]

post-79-1117501022_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I sure hope those are new C&H cartoons. I truly miss Watterson's 'Calvin and Hobbes' and Larson's 'Far Side' work - nothing as great has replaced them in the funny papers.

The only ones that I currently enjoy are 'Zits' (pretty solid generation gap humor, where both age groups get equally dissed) and 'Fox Trot' (the writer is clearly a Star Wars/LOTR/superhero fanboy, ergo earning my immediate respect). 'Dilbert' used to be a hoot, but sadly jumped the shark a couple of years ago.

To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ouch, you're right, SZ. I got those two Sunday strips confused. My bad. Sorry for the false trivia challenge. sad.gif And I call myself a comic strip aficionado.

As for Dilbert, Andrew, it may have jumped the shark or not, but as a corporate cube dweller, I have to say it still makes me laugh out loud more often than any other strip. Easily.

Biggest laugh in recent weeks, though, was Fox Trot, when uber-geek Jason attempts to come to grips with the horrifying prospect that his uber-clueless father was -- gasp! -- a Star Wars fan before Jason was even born. Intones Roger, rolling his eyes: "Search your feelings, you know it to be true." Bwa-ha-ha!

I like Fox Trot quite a bit. Other than the tiresome clueless-father gags, my biggest gripe with the strip is that Bill Amend doesn't know how to set up a punchline. His formula relies on one character saying something that is (supposedly) naturally understood one way, but when another character says something that reveals the misunderstanding, the first character clarifies, "No, no, I mean this, not that." The problem is that character B inevitably expresses the misunderstanding by directly asking "Oh, you mean this?" which prematurely tips off the reader to the coming punchline.

I will say more about this later, when I have some more time.

I generally like Zits more... there probably my main dissatisfaction (and it's a minor one) is that the artwork, though it's very good, doesn't push the expressions and reaction shots to the next level the way Watterson did.

I have this theory about Zits that it's essentially Calvin & Hobbes nine years later. Calvin = Jeremy; Hobbes = Hector; Susie = Sara; Calvin's bespectacled professional father has put on weight and changed careers but is largely the same character; mom has a perm and is showing her age a bit but could be the same character; the wagon and cardboard box has been replaced by the VW minibus; etc.

Yes, I take the funnies WAY too seriously.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to post
Share on other sites

Once again, I'm in agreement with Andrew. I've not really found any good replacements for Calvin and Hobbes or The Far Side. Dilbert is occasionally funny; most of those published in our paper are just innane.

So you ladies and you gentlemen, pull your bloomers on...

-Joe Henry

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is very little in our small town paper's comics page that I read any more. Sigh. I miss Far Side, Bloom County and Calvin & Hobbes.

When I get the chance to see a Sunday paper ("small town", remember?), I like to see what the critters in Mutts are up to. There is something about the style and art about that one that I like. And I'm a softy with cats too...

B

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think with the varied talents and the sharp senses of humor on this board, we could challenge each other to come up with THE BEST @#$%! COMIC STRIP SINCE CALVIN AND HOBBES.

I know some of you do some cartooning.

I would buy a paper every day just to read the Doonesbury political satire of Alan Thomas.

Or the Michel-Gondry/Charlie-Kaufman bizarro-land of M. Dale Prins.

Or the Calvin-and-Hobbes-ish wonder and delight of Steven D. Greydanus.

Or the comic misadventures of a high school teacher shaking his head over the shenanigans of his young students--"Peanuts" in reverse--as illustrated by Dan Buck.

Or the egomania of actors and playwrights in the backstage revelations of Ron Reed.

How hard would it be to start individual comic threads, where you each sketch out a three-panel cartoon once a week, scan it, and share it with the rest of us?

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Or the comic misadventures of a high school teacher shaking his head over the shenanigans of his young students--"Peanuts" in reverse--as illustrated by Dan Buck.

No one will be laughing at my PEANUTS! In reverse or otherwise! cussing.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

No strip has come close to the brilliance that is Calvin & Hobbes since that time. Not even close. Bill Watterson is a genius and one of my very favourite artists (in any genre) of all time...says the guy who for many years had different Calvin themed avatars (the "Calvin's Flip-book" one was my fav).

That said, anyone who is missing the kind of thing that Calvin & Hobbes gave us, I heartily encourage you to track down the first three volumes of Fantagraphics The Complete Peanuts, which is brilliant and one can see how Watterson must have been inspired by the early spirit of Schultz's strip, before it became watered down with countless TV special's and advertising campaigns.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Darrel, I like Get Fuzzy as well. Besides the cat with an attitude, I think it is the fact that the characters show up in the frames half cropped that seems to lend to the humor of it all. Anything more would seem to be distracting taking away from it.

Brandon

"God is so great and merciful that he does not require that we name him precisely. God is even willing to be anonymous for a time. Remember how God led the Three Wise Men from the East to Christ? The Wise Men did not know the God of Israel or Jesus. They worshipped the stars. So God used a star to lure them."--The Twelve Steps for Christians

myspace-animation-codes121.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not a newspaper strip, but I really like Homestar Runner, and especially the Strong Bad E-mails. I was introduced to them oh, about a year ago, and I've now seen all the e-mails, and some of the cartoons. It's good, it's clean, and it's funny. Anyone else here familiar with this site?

In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...