Jump to content

Red Eye


Jeff
 Share

Recommended Posts

Thought I'd get the ball rolling on a topic for Red Eye, a late-summer airplane thriller. Apparently, this movie stars the lovely but shrill Rachel McAdams, the gruff character actor Brian Cox, and best of all, Batman Begins' Cillian Murphy (who was flippin' terrific in that film, especially when he goes "He's here...the Bat-Man"; it's still giving me nerd goosebumps a month later).

From now on, you can consider me interested any time Murphy plays a crazed or menacing character in a thriller. As a result of his involvement, this movie might just prove to be a fun time. And besides, what else is there to see this August? Marky-Mark's Sons-of-Katie-Elder remake looks like another mere let's-see-how-many-rappers-we-can-cram-into-the-cast flick, and although I will probably see The Brother's Grimm, I dislike Heath Ledger ever since he did that abysmal Four Feathers movie. But I digress.

For now, count me in as modestly excited to see Red Eye. smile.gif

Edited by Mister Jeff

-"I... drink... your... milkshake! I drink it up!"

Daniel Plainview, There Will Be Blood

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ugh, I didn't realize that Wes Craven was involved...Well, we'll see what happens.

Was Cillian Murphy the "hero" in 28 Days Later?

I didn't see that movie, but yes, he was the main character.

-"I... drink... your... milkshake! I drink it up!"

Daniel Plainview, There Will Be Blood

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes. Wes Craven. Tag line: "Fear takes flight." Result: My interest level losing altitude quickly.

Craven has a long list of duds to his name, but as someone reared on his horror flicks

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Test to see if my post count is clicking upward. I could swear I just posted here in the Film area but DIDN

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really liked the trailer for this film. It's got me interested and doesn't give anything away. I wish more trailers would take a lesson from this one.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a side note: Cillian Murphy (which if I remember my Gaelic correctly is prounounced "Killian") was in a short film a few years back using only the Gaelic language. I don't really expect anyone to share my niche interest in this obscure language, but maybe someone could tell me how I could go about finding a region 1 NTSC DVD of "Filleann an Feall"

Cillian's filmography

Edited by finnegan

I have a blog? here at A&F that I sometimes post in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 weeks later...

I caught Red Eye at an appreciably cheap matinee today, and though the combined effects of movie-theater daze and saving a couple bucks are still affecting me, I can say that I liked it. The first act is quite riveting, and the second act is at least satisfactory. Of course, during the final third of the movie, Craven and company sell out to Hollywood thriller conventions, and the ending is both predictable and hard to believe; but even so, McAdams and Murphy have us so involved in their characters by then that you can't help but remain interested.

As a matter of fact, Murphy and McAdams are both fantastic. I'm talking REALLY good. Murphy is believably creepy in the static, role of Jackson Rippner. Basically, he does what Tom Cruise did in Collateral (a film that Red Eye borrows from quite liberally): he creates an unchanging, one-dimensional, charismatic antagonist who doesn't really need any character development. And he does it very well, too. This work is on par with what he turned in as the Scarecrow in Batman Begins.

And McAdams is even better. The film completely hinges on her performance, and she is more than up to the challenge. Her facial expressions alone are enough to get you to sympathize with her; she looks at you with those big, frightened, puppy-dog brown eyes, and you just melt. She also takes a somewhat predictable character back-story, and some associated quirks, and makes them into a believable part of her personality. Really, the word that best describes her is "believable".

As I said before, the film very much resembles Collateral in its basic structure. A nearly-crazed, non-developed villain teams up with a non-complicit sidekick in an enclosed space, and forces that sidekick to aid him in his nasty bidding. In both films, the non-complicit sidekick is in no position to bargain, to get outside help, or to turn the situation to their favor. So they try a few different methods of avoiding what seems to be the inevitable task of doing something morally wrong by force.

Of course, Collateral had a much cooler vibe, and it was much more technically polished. Red Eye has several annoying aspects, including inappropriately timed comic-relief, lame reaction shots, and the over-humanizing of other passengers on McAdam's airplance. Collateral is the better movie, but for those who like thrillers and don't mind a typical climax and resolution, Red Eye is engaging, well-acted fun. 3 out of 5.

Edited by Mister Jeff

-"I... drink... your... milkshake! I drink it up!"

Daniel Plainview, There Will Be Blood

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought this was a pretty good suspense thriller. Cillian Murphy and Rachel McAdams are both quite good, and the film was well constructed in the way that it builds tension throughout without going off on unnecessary tangents. The scenes on the airplane were quite good, but I was a little disappointed in the final half hour or so. I guess Wes Craven couldn't help himself in selling out to cliches here. You can't always teach an old dog new tricks, I suppose. However, Craven has succeeded in making a pretty solid film, not reinventing the wheel but delivering a thriller for people who like thrillers.

Besides, I saw this with my mom, who likes suspense movies, and she liked it, so that's saying something. smile.gif

Edited by Crow
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I'm surprised how negative the reviews are. It's summer fare, quite entertaining, and while it does get chasey, and ultimately (arguably) over the top, so what? It doesn't ever get flat-out stupid: almost free of those galling internal inconsistencies that really sink a movie for me. I saw it the night after viewing SPARTAN, which definitely reached farther but was massively flawed. It's also compared (usually unfavourably) to COLLATERAL, and while the first part of COLLATERAL was really something, once it started getting stupid it got really stupid: talk about descending into improbability and cliche!

I got a kick out of RED EYE, and would have to agree - both of the leads turn in strong performances. (And what's all this about "predictable" - if they mean, "it was obvious the woman would outsmart the bad guy," well, duh? Since when is that a problem in genre pix? The fun is in how she'll pull it off, and I think the film messes around with that perfectly satisfyingly.)

I've posted a couple hundred of my Soul Food Movies write-ups at letterboxd

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Earlier this summer, Spielberg taught us several important lessons in his film War of the Worlds. The most important of which was to finish your basement and buy a brownstone in Boston. Now, Wes Craven presents his own set of life lessons through the non-supernatural thriller Red Eye. I should caution you, some of Craven's lessons are aimed at would-be assasins rather than the good people of Miami.

spoilers1.gif

1. Those bathrooms on airplanes have a much greater capacity than you might think.

2. Don't trust airphones if you're planning to assassinate a high-ranking government official.

3. Girls, learn to play field hockey.

4. Guys, don't be deceived by the cheerleader photos in your victim's father's house; she plays field hockey, too.

5. Guys (part II): When you are holding a woman's father hostage in order to coerce her into helping you assassinate an important person, do not make snide comments about female emotions and male logic. It will bite you in the tushie.

6. Always carry TWO rockets with your bazooka.

7. A scarf is a stylish and curiously effective bandage for your tracheotomy. Given a choice, opt for the burgandy color so as not to display the inevitable blood seepage.

8. Contrary to popular belief, people on airplanes are completely unobservant and will never notice if you take their things.

9. Even bad guys don't use their cellphones on the plane, so don't get any ideas.

10. Late summer's hottest accessory: hired hitmen that are as well-behaved as dogs.

Jesus is not a zombie...I shouldn't have to tell you that.

--Agent Booth, Bones

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And what's all this about "predictable" - if they mean, "it was obvious the woman would outsmart the bad guy," well, duh? Since when is that a problem in genre pix? The fun is in how she'll pull it off, and I think the film messes around with that perfectly satisfyingly.

It isn't so much the fact that she outsmarts him that is predictable, as much as the ways in which she does so. I'm not saying it was perfectly obvious that she'd

stick a pen in his Adam's apple

and so on. But once the two ended up in the usual

sneaking-around-the-house thriller-movie situation with a temporarily-KO'd Brian Cox lying on top of a nearby pistol

, it's quite clear how things are going to end.

Still, the movie really worked for me despite any quibbles I have. Like I said before, Murphy and McAdams are fun to watch. One scene in particular where McAdam's does really well is when her character is obviously terrified of the plane's rough take-off, but is distractedly conversing with Jackson during it. Very believable emoting, right there.

-"I... drink... your... milkshake! I drink it up!"

Daniel Plainview, There Will Be Blood

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(And what's all this about "predictable" - if they mean, "it was obvious the woman would outsmart the bad guy," well, duh? Since when is that a problem in genre pix? The fun is in how she'll pull it off, and I think the film messes around with that perfectly satisfyingly.)

My vote for the most predictable moment:

spoilers1.gif

Lisa and Ripner are playing cat-and-mouse in her dad's home, and Lisa spots the shower stall closed off by a curtain-- perfect hiding spot for the bad guy to jump out and ambush her from! So, as the ominous music swells, Lisa raises her bat to strike the death blow, takes a deep breath, jerks the curtain open, and-- oh... no one there. Whew!

But... aside from that and a a couple other cheesy moments... the film worked for me, too. Very tense, compelling thriller-- particularly the scenes on the plane-- played by a couple of terrifically magnetic actors. Very classy stuff.

Partner in Cahoots

www.cahootsmag.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...