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Anders

Sir Thomas More

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Last night I read this 1593 collaborative play (including the hand of Shakespeare) on the man who would later be known as St Thomas More, and the subject of Robert Bolt's A Man For All Seasons. Anyone else read it? Any observations?

The play was supressed during the reign of Elizabeth, due to it's favorable portrayal of a well-known Catholic martyr. More is portrayed as a just, man of the people, maintaining their support even to his execution. One of the key (yet fictionally exaggerated) incidents is Sheriff More's appeal to the rioters on May Day 1517. What is particularly interesting is the appeal to the King's God given authority to calm the crowd, and then later his own rejection of that same authority in the form of the Act of Succession. I wonder if this inconsistency is a result of the multiple playwrights, as the characters in the play seem oblivious to this.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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What is particularly interesting is the appeal to the King's God given authority to calm the crowd, and then later his own rejection of that same authority in the form of the Act of Succession. I wonder if this inconsistency is a result of the multiple playwrights, as the characters in the play seem oblivious to this.

I'm not sure More would have seen an inconsistency there at all. God-given authority to reign as King of England is one thing; authority to reign as Supreme Head of the Church in England is something completely different.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

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What is particularly interesting is the appeal to the King's God given authority to calm the crowd, and then later his own rejection of that same authority in the form of the Act of Succession. I wonder if this inconsistency is a result of the multiple playwrights, as the characters in the play seem oblivious to this.

I'm not sure More would have seen an inconsistency there at all. God-given authority to reign as King of England is one thing; authority to reign as Supreme Head of the Church in England is something completely different.

Yep, that's pretty much the conclusion we came to in the seminar.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

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