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'The Week'

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Edited by Christian

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From the Week's Web site.

Good Week For

Sin, after a study by Brigham Young University found that Mormons weighed an average of 4.6 pounds more than other Utahans, and were more likely to be obese. Researchers said Mormons were compensating for not drinking, smoking, and fornicating by stuffing themselves with food.

Bad Week For

The Spanish Winter Olympics team, which had every piece of its luggage lost by an airline en route to Turin, Italy, including skis and snowboards.

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OK, we signed up for a year's subscription. But for all the fun snippets of info in The Week, the best thing I've read so far in the magazine is this piece on the growing market for ... brace yourselves ... human body parts. Very troubling, but, uh, informative. The article ran just one page in the print edition -- long by the magazine's standards -- but it packs in quite a bit. Very succinct:

What happened to Cooke

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Good Week For

Cultural sensitivity, after British nursery schools changed the lyric of the rhyme 'Baa baa, black sheep' to 'Baa baa, rainbow sheep,' so as not to offend dark-skinned people. 'What on earth is a rainbow sheep?' one parent wanted to know.

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Hollywood Reporter film writer/blogger Anne Thompson has a new favorite magazine:

Now Time is becoming more like Newsweek, which has long embraced more individual voices. I scarf up both of these mags (along with EW, The New Yorker and New York), every week. I also love The Week, which has editors trawling for the best stories all over the world. I just read a fascinating piece that was culled from a book called Washed Up: The Curious Journeys of Flotsam and Jetsam, about tons of eddying trash in the ocean. Who knew?

--I just read the same piece this morning, and it's fascinating.

Edited by Christian

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I used to subscribe to it about four years ago, back when I had the money to spend on subscriptions. I loved this magazine. When I read it cover to cover I came away with the (delusional??) satisfaction that I was then COMPLETELY informed on everything and was totally hip to what was going on in the world.

Now I have no money so I just watch the Daily Show.

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I used to subscribe to the British edition (which came first, I wonder? I assumed at the time - 10 years ago probably - that it was a UK thing. But life for Brits always brings surprises about things which are so part of our cultural life that we don't realise they've come from somewhere else. I still remember the surprise I experienced as a child to discover that Kellogg's, Heinz and Mars were not native British firms). It was great - a masterpiece of editing to just the right tone and length as well as a good eye for great stories. I regret stopping it (I reached a point where I didn't have time to read even this!) and keep thinking I should restart my subscription. Maybe now I will.

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The Week has revamped its Web site to include more of each issue. I haven't had time to explore the site yet, but this week's issue of the print magazine comes wrapped in a glossy promo about the upgraded site. It promises links to the full material (published elsewhere) that is excerpted in each print issue.

If the site is as addictive as the print magazine, I'll be checking it regularly.

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David Carr in the NY Times:

Perhaps it is a personal problem, one born of having the attention span of a gnat and being too jacked-in for my own good. Yes, I keep The New Yorker on my nightstand, and when it

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The Wrap looks at the latest circulation numbers for print magazines, and draws a few lessons, including:

4. The Week continues to amaze.

Felix Dennis

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The new issue rounds up reviews of Otis Taylor's Contraband -- including Thom Jurek's -- and assigns the album four stars:

Fans will recognize the “textural strangeness” of Taylor’s approach to the blues, said Thom Jurek in AllMusic.com. His guitar and banjo are accompanied here by instruments as diverse as cornet and djembe, while his lyrics—delivered in a distinctive cadence—explore “race, class, and interpersonal relationships in unusual ways.” The sum sounds like no blues you’ve heard, and like all blues in spirit.

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