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Oscars:Thread for petty predictions,dismissals,rants,trivia.

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This year's Oscar host will be...

Billy Crystal.

Drat. Steve Martin rules.

ohmy.gif I respectfully disagree! I thought Martin was cynical, rude, and a bit too heavy with the "Hollywood insider" jokes the last time. Billy Crystal has been genuinely funny. I've seen Martin rule, but not at the Oscars.

But at least the host won't be Wanda Sykes :roll:


There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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FWIW, I do plan to set up a real-time chat server for the Oscars so that we can comment during the event. Although it may not be appropriate for films, the chat should work really well for the Oscars. Good idea? :?:

Will you please help those of us out who don't have the internet at home? sad.gif Would it be possible to post a transcript on the boards afterward?

Oh, and I'll be really premature here and go off on my own rant for a second: If Oscar doesn't reward Peter Jackson with a best picture and/or best director award, I'm gonna feel like donning some armor and rushing out to hunt some orc! :evil:

And I'm not a violent person. I promise!

Diane

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AlanW wrote:

: FWIW, I do plan to set up a real-time chat server for the Oscars so that

: we can comment during the event.

I take it, then, that ChristianityToday.com would not be hosting a similar chat next year?

DRose wrote:

: If Oscar doesn't reward Peter Jackson with a best picture and/or best

: director award, I'm gonna feel like donning some armor and rushing out

: to hunt some orc!

I would wait until seeing the film before saying anything like that, myself.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I would wait until seeing the film before saying anything like that, myself.

Hey, I warned you that it was really premature. Plus, I figure the Academy owes Jackson one from a couple of years ago, actually. (That's pointless, I know, but still....) And I'm really excited because I finally saw the RotK preview last night. So bear with me, please.

Diane

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DRose wrote:

: And I'm really excited because I finally saw the RotK preview last night.

Hey, like I said in the thread devoted to that preview, it has ME pretty stoked, too! So I know what you mean. But still. Patience, patience.

The weird thing will be watching Return of the King in the theatre and feeling a sense of closure once it's all over, and yet NOT feeling a sense of closure because I know the film will have to be expanded for the DVD in another 11 months.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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David Poland raises some very interesting questions about this year's Oscar race...

HERE.

Excerpt:

There are an unusual number of films this year that are facing choices about how to position their actors for awards consideration. I'm not talking about whether Scarlett Johansson should be pushed as a Supporting Actress. I think that's a pretty obvious "no."

I'm talking about Lord of the Ring: Return of the King, Seabiscuit, Big Fish, The Alamo, Mystic River, Love Actually, 21 Grams, Cold Mountain & Calendar Girls. Which, of the three, Seabiscuit leads is a lead and which one(s) is a supporting performance? Is Albert Finney the lead of Big Fish or is his younger self, played by Ewan McGregor? Is Naomi Watts a lead in 21 Grams? Is anyone a lead in Love Actually?


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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David Poland raises some very interesting questions about this year's Oscar race...

Which, of the three, Seabiscuit leads is a lead and which one(s) is a supporting performance? Is Albert Finney the lead of Big Fish or is his younger self, played by Ewan McGregor? Is Naomi Watts a lead in 21 Grams? Is anyone a lead in Love Actually?

Very interesting, Jeffrey. I've always wondered how they decide who's up in what categories, especially when it's an ensemble cast. Although it shouldn't be, is it an age thing? A big name thing? Reminds me of one of your Oscar comments from last year. Remember the whole Julianne Moore/Nicole Kidman/The Hours thing? It wasn't an issue of screen time there.

Diane

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David Poland raises some very interesting questions about this year's Oscar race...

Which, of the three, Seabiscuit leads is a lead and which one(s) is a supporting performance? Is Albert Finney the lead of Big Fish or is his younger self, played by Ewan McGregor? Is Naomi Watts a lead in 21 Grams? Is anyone a lead in Love Actually?

Very interesting, Jeffrey. I've always wondered how they decide who's up in what categories, especially when it's an ensemble cast. Although it shouldn't be, is it an age thing? A big name thing? Reminds me of one of your Oscar comments from last year. Remember the whole Julianne Moore/Nicole Kidman/The Hours thing? It wasn't an issue of screen time there.

Diane

I expect studios would push for the character that was best acted to be the "lead" role in a movie where it could go several ways.

Scott -- 2nd Story -- Twitter

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Which, of the three, Seabiscuit leads is a lead and which one(s) is a supporting performance?

Heck, the HORSE should be considered too ...

Judging from dramatic structure and point of view, Jeff Bridges is the lead actor. Even an ensemble film has a point of view -- that's why Ethan Hawke is the lead actor in Dead Poets Society. Nominations aren't always based on such analysis -- but the award usually is, isn't it? Can anyone think of a lead-acting Oscar awarded for what was really a supporting role? Or vice versa?

I expect studios would push for the character that was best acted to be the "lead" role in a movie where it could go several ways.

Ideally, in a well-cast movie there wouldn't be a "character that was best acted." You don't want one person's acting to outshine the others' -- it makes for a very uneven film. (Val Kilmer's turn in Tombstone comes to mind -- the only good performance in an otherwise thoroughly rotten film. But it was clearly a supporting role.)

In 1984, both Murray Abraham and Tom Hulce were nominated as lead actors for Amadeus -- kind of an unusual step for a studio to take. (Granted, the Mozart role was expanded when the play was adapted for the screen, but the story's still told from Salieri's point of view.) Abraham won both the Golden Globe and the Oscar; Hulce got bupkus, whereas he might well have won the supporting award if only he'd been nominated for it.


Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

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Can anyone think of a lead-acting Oscar awarded for what was really a supporting role? Or vice versa?

Denzel Washington for Training Day. The film's from Ethan Hawke's point of view. (And yet he was nominated for Best Supporting Actor. He had more screen time, doggone it!)

Then there's Nicole Kidman for The Hours. I think if that film is in anyone's perspective, it's in Meryl Streep's.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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I'm suddenly rather pleased to discover that David Poland's best guess-timates of which films will be in the final running for Oscar includes several titles that I haven't yet seen. (He's seen most of them.) It's going to be an exciting season:

THE RANKINGS


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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I'm suddenly rather pleased to discover that David Poland's best guess-timates of which films will be in the final running for Oscar includes several titles that I haven't yet seen. (He's seen most of them.) It's going to be an exciting season:

THE RANKINGS

What film does Tim Burton have coming out this year?

I would love to see Finding Nemo get at least a nomination for best film. It kills me how animation is ghettoized in a catagory that hardly anybody pays attention to. I'm not sure it's the best movie to come out this year, but it's definifitely one of them and deserves to play with the big boys.


Scott -- 2nd Story -- Twitter

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I completely agree about Nemo, Solishu. It'll be in my Top 5 of the year, and any other year it might have been #1. But with Stevie out this year, and promising signs about Return of the King, it will have to settle for 3rd.

Burton's film is Big Fish, with Albert Finney as an aging freakshow circus man on his deathbed reminiscing about his life (with Ewan McGregor as his younger self.) Getting very good adavance buzz.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Good heavens. You mean, for the first time in what seems like forever, one of Tim Burton's films will NOT be an adaptation or re-make of a pre-existing franchise or pop-culture mythos, be it a comic-book superhero (Batman, Batman Returns), a movie (Planet of the Apes), a trading-card series (Mars Attacks!), an old folk tale (Sleepy Hollow), or a B-movie auteur (Ed Wood)? You mean he might be doing something ORIGINAL?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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The Academy has chosen 12 documentaries for consideration this year.

Stevie is not among them.

http://www.moviecitynews.com/


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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There may still be hope. The list on MCN only listed 9 of the 12.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Darrel Manson wrote:

: There may still be hope. The list on MCN only listed 9 of the 12.

The list I saw had 12 (of which I have seen 3 -- Bus 174, The Fog of War and The Weather Underground, all of which are fantastic).

With any luck, maybe Errol Morris will finally get the Oscar he so richly deserves.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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The Academy has chosen 12 documentaries for consideration this year.

Stevie is not among them.

http://www.moviecitynews.com/

Here's the Hollywood Reporter's take, which notes how the rules changes for the selection process have altered which films make the cut:

------------------------

Throughout most of the 1980s and '90s, the Academy's selection of the year's best documentaries inevitably triggered howls of outrage as a succession of popular and critically well-regarded docs were routinely ignored. Such titles as Errol Morris' "The Thin Blue Line" and "A Brief History of Time," Moore's "Roger & Me" and Steve James' "Hoop Dreams" received Oscar snubs.

But beginning in 1999, the Academy reorganized its documentary committee, ensuring that its members were actively involved in nonfiction filmmaking. This year, it further refined its rules so that wider theatrical exhibition became one of the qualifying factors. "We are trying to encourage a legitimate theatrical rollout," Freida Lee Mock, chair of the documentary branch executive committee, explained at the time.

As a result, documentary connoisseurs have begun to give a thumbs up to the Academy's choices.

"In the last few years, ever since they made changes to the committee, the choices have been very strong," Sony Pictures Classics co-head Michael Barker says. "Last year, any one of those five nominees deserved to win." SPC is distributing Morris' newest documentary, "The Fog of War," which made this year's shortlist.

"Errol is the greatest documentarian in America, and this is the first time he's made the shortlist, so we're overjoyed," Barker says.

Adds Mark Urman, who heads distribution at ThinkFilm, which secured two spots on the shortlist: for Jonathan Demme's "The Agronomist" and Felipe Lacerda and Jose Padilha's "Bus 174": "The doors have opened in the narrative, nonfiction category. When I distributed Errol Morris' last feature (1999's 'Mr. Death') -- a masterwork -- the committee wasn't interested. The category was still very moribund and contentious. They still defined an acceptable documentary as objective, no opinions, information only, but we are now seeing the narrative, nonfiction category open up to embrace more personal, authorial voices."

The remainder of the shortlist includes Carles Bosch and Josep M. Domenech's "Balseros," Jarecki's "Capturing the Friedmans," Richard Schickel's "Charlie: The Life and Art of Charlie Chaplin," Marc Levin's "Heir to an Execution," Peter Hegedus' "Inheritance: A Fisherman's Story," Megan Mylan and Jou Shenk's "Lost Boys of Sudan," Nathaniel Kahn's "My Architect: A Son's Journey," Jonathan Karsh's "My Flesh and Blood" and Sam Green and Bill Siegel's "The Weather Undergound."

-------------------

I couldn't agree more with the comments on "Mr. Death." That film floored me.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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And now for the eligible animated films (the ones I have seen are in bold):

Brother Bear

Finding Nemo

Jester Till

The Jungle Book 2

Looney Tunes: Back in Action

Millenium Actress

Piglet's Big Movie

Pokemon Heroes

Rugrats Go Wild!

Tokyo Godfathers

The Triplets of Belleville

Three of these films have not been released yet; Triplets (which I hope to see next week as part of the EU Film Festival) is slated to open in Los Angeles November 21, and Jester and Tokyo are slated for December 5. FWIW, in a year with less than 16 eligible animated films, a maximum of three films can be nominated in the Feature Animation category. And I must admit I'm a little surprised to see that Sinbad didn't make the eligibility list -- did DreamWorks just not bother to even TRY to get the film nominated?

So ... who will follow in the footsteps of Shrek and Spirited Away?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Now the press release on Special FX:

(Anybody else notice a particular GLARING OMISSION from this list?)

Academy Announces Films in Competition for Visual Effects Oscar®

Beverly Hills, CA - The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced the seven films being considered for Achievement in Visual Effects for the 76th Academy Awards®.

The films in consideration are listed below in alphabetical order:

The Hulk

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World

Peter Pan

Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl

Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines

X2

Fifteen-minute clip reels from each of the seven films will be screened for the Visual Effects Award Nominating Committee on January 21. The members will then nominate three of these seven films for Oscar consideration.

The finalists will be announced along with nominations in 23 other categories on Tuesday, January 27, at 5:30 a.m. PST.

Academy Awards for outstanding film achievements of 2003 will be presented on Sunday, February 29, 2004, at the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood & Highland® and televised live by the ABC Television Network at 5 p.m. PST, beginning with a half-hour arrival segment.

I'll give you a hint. It starts with THE MAT, has RIX REV in the middle, and ends with OLUTIONS.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Jeffrey Overstreet wrote:

: (Anybody else notice a particular GLARING OMISSION from this list?)

Wow. Just, wow.

This bums me out. I feel robbed. In 1999, The Matrix snatched the special-effects Oscar out from under George Lucas's nose, and in 2002, The Two Towers did the same. Now that the Wachowskis and Peter Jackson had proved the superiority of their films to the Star Wars prequels, I was eager to see which trilogy would come out on top this year. But, no, there will be no such contest. The two Matrix films have been shut out completely. So, no anticipation, no weeks or months of debate, no edge-of-my-seat climax. I feel let down.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Ouch. After pretty much trashing RotK (with the exception of battle scenes), Jeffrey Wells calls on Academy voters to please stop this movie...and throw support behind, well, another one that won't make most of you too happy (although you won't be surprised).

No one Democratic candidate for President has managed to rally the stop-Howard-Dean forces, but it may now be time for all good Academy members who want to stop THE RETURN OF THE KING to pool their combined sentiments behind Clint Eastwood's MYSTIC RIVER. We all know it's not a great film, but it's an extremely well-made one, and it wouldn't be remotely shameful if it won.

So rally round and spread the word -- Clint is the hammer who will stop Peter Jackson. Eastwood seems to be waving to the troops and implying as much in a MYSTIC RIVER TV spot that's now showing on network stations. It begins with Eastwood telling an unseen interviewer that his film "isn't about special effects."

Diane

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