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The Wages of Fear


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Nathaniel,

It's not the New Beverly Cinema, but SORCERER is going to be playing in Hollywood this coming Saturday at 9:15pm at the Mann's (now TCL) Chinese Theatre, as part of the Turner Classic Movie Film Festival.  Limited individual tickets will be sold at the box office on the day of the show (not sure exactly what time they're available) for $20.  More details can be found here.

 

This is the new restored print?  The one I saw in Brooklyn with Friedkin was in bad shape.

In eternity this world will be Troy, I believe, and all that has passed here will be the epic of the universe, the ballad they sing in the streets. -- Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson

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Scott,

Yes.  Quoting from the program, this is the "new, digital restoration that premiered to great acclaim at the Venice Film Festival."
 

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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Friedkin just tweeted:

 

William Friedkin

This Saturday at 9:15PM, I will introduce the new print Of SORCERER at the Chinese Theatre.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Adam Nayman no likey.

 

Like so many of those ’70s-vintage white elephants, it’s a film that invites critical heavy lifting to compensate for its inability to stand on its own. The sequences showing Scanlon and the others acclimatizing to life in an economically depressed backwater feel like just so much goldbricking en route to the main event: the perilous two-truck convoy across 200 miles of jungle terrain, with unstable nitroglycerin as their payload. There’s no substance to the film’s disgust for the oil company, and a scene where the indigenous victims of a massive oil fire are passed between the townspeople in body bags is the worst sort of grandstanding: it’s grotesque, hectoring and immediately disposable, a mere prelude to the automotive melodrama.

 

It's been years since I've seen Wages of Fear or Sorceror, but I thought I remembered Wages having a lengthy prologue that sets the stage for the economic desperation that drives the men to take the job, whereas Sorceror, I thought, was less concerned with back story and more concerned with the mission. Seems I may have gotten that backward, but no matter: I can't remember if I preferred Wages to Sorceror on that level. I remember liking both films for different reasons.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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