Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
utzworld

A Black Thing

Recommended Posts

IPB Image

Actually, it's available as a digitally remastered 30th anniversary edition DVD!

O.K. Not quite bootlegged...but here's a couple of key things to note:

1. It's released by some no name DVD company...which is probably because

2. Sony/MGM probably wants nothing to do with this movie for obvious reasons. Sony/MGM inheirited this film as a result of MGM's purchase of United Artists - the original distributor of the film - who probably was "forced" to disown the film. Legend has it that, even though it got good reviews and found an audience when it was initially released, "the powers that be" got this one shuffled in and out of the theatres ASAP.

Why you ask? Here's the plot:

A Black man is trained by the CIA as an operative. Once he gets his CIA stripes, he goes back to the hood to teach a group of Black Panther types everything he learned from the Feds. Needless to say, they take all his "wisdom" and devise a plan to stick it to The Man. Lots of explosions at the end of this one.

A pretty good movie IMHO...I just might buy this DVD! Thanks, Doug! :D

Edited by utzworld

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Directed by Ivan Dixon, eh? I'm gonna get a copy.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In their defense, they don't show too many at all. I'd say 65% of their playlist is pre-'55. Maybe 5% is post '65. Almost nothing later than 1985.

Like I say, they SPECIALIZE in the era when most AA films and roles were offensive by today's standards. That's why there are so many questionable films. The commentary should be a bit rough on those films.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like I say, they SPECIALIZE in the era when most AA films and roles were offensive by today's standards. That's why there are so many questionable films. The commentary should be a bit rough on those films.

Let's hope so. But Rich, it's not really a question of era--there are plenty of examples of progressive or provocative Hollywood films about AA and race relations (Tourneur's 1950 Stars in My Crown--a film TCM owns--comes to mind) that are not included. Even if they were restricted by their holdings, that wouldn't exclude TCM from critique, either; if they don't have good films, why do a series at all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But Rich, it's not really a question of era--there are plenty of examples of progressive or provocative Hollywood films about AA and race relations (Tourneur's 1950 Stars in My Crown--a film TCM owns--comes to mind) that are not included. Even if they were restricted by their holdings, that wouldn't exclude TCM from critique, either; if they don't have good films, why do a series at all?

Yes! That's where I saw it last year. And they have shown the rather radical work of a Black filmmaker of the silent period on their Sunday night silent series, whose name escapes me at the moment (making Imdb useless, I once was able not even to rely on Imdb. I'm getting old.). I'm surprised that he was left out in favor of such as Birth of A Nation. I agree that a better job could be done on this. I'm stressing that earlier eras are their strength to those who would feel that modern eras highlight African Americans and AA filmmaking much better. Not that we would have any indication of that from this particular playlist.

Edited by Rich Kennedy

"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess what came in the mail today??? :)

IPB Image

O.K. Not quite bootlegged...but here's a couple of key things to note:

1. It's released by some no name DVD company...

Boy, did I botch up that description. The print of the film is pristine, the picture and sound quality is excellent, and the "no-name DVD company" is actually a division of an AA film & video company headed by Venus Flytrap himself, Tim Reid! Some may recall his show "Frank's Place" that aired almost 20 years ago. It was his attempt at showing an AA based dramedy. It got critical acclaim and low ratings...but inspired him to start his own film company.

I'm currently rewatching the film. I can understand why the Feds tried to drag this film into oblivion. I guess they didn't want the Brothers and Sisters emulating what they saw in this flick. Strangely enough, they had no problem with the Brothers and Sisters emulating what they saw in "Superfly". Double standard? I think so!

Here's the plot:

A Black man is trained by the CIA as an operative. Once he gets his CIA stripes, he goes back to the hood to teach a group of Black Panther types everything he learned from the Feds. Needless to say, they take all his "wisdom" and devise a plan to stick it to The Man.

Actually, its not a bunch of Panther types he's training. It's a friggin street gang! Once they're trained, they're shipped off to other parts of the country to recruit and train other street gangs! Yep. J. Edgar Hoover and Co. must have pissed themselves a river after getting wind of this flick! I sure do wish TCM had the b@!!s to show this one during their "Niggrahs On Celluloid" festival.

Edited by utzworld

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess what came in the mail today??? :)

IPB Image

O.K. Not quite bootlegged...but here's a couple of key things to note:

1. It's released by some no name DVD company...

Boy, did I botch up that description. The print of the film is pristine, the picture and sound quality is excellent, and the "no-name DVD company" is actually a division of an AA film & video company headed by Venus Flytrap himself, Tim Reid! Some may recall his show "Frank's Place" that aired almost 20 years ago. It was his attempt at showing an AA based dramedy. It got critical acclaim and low ratings...but inspired him to start his own film company.

I'm currently rewatching the film. I can understand why the Feds tried to drag this film into oblivion. I guess they didn't want the Brothers and Sisters emulating what they saw in this flick. Strangely enough, they had no problem with the Brothers and Sisters emulating what they saw in "Superfly". Double standard? I think so!

Here's the plot:

A Black man is trained by the CIA as an operative. Once he gets his CIA stripes, he goes back to the hood to teach a group of Black Panther types everything he learned from the Feds. Needless to say, they take all his "wisdom" and devise a plan to stick it to The Man.

Actually, its not a bunch of Panther types he's training. It's a friggin street gang! Once they're trained, they're shipped off to other parts of the country to recruit and train other street gangs! Yep. J. Edgar Hoover and Co. must have pissed themselves a river after getting wind of this flick! I sure do wish TCM had the b@!!s to show this one during their "Niggrahs On Celluloid" festival.

Now you've done it. My Netflix que just grew by one.


Scott -- 2nd Story -- Twitter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, Tim Reid! I loved him on WKRP, and wish he'd gotten his due afterward - it's good to know he's still around.

Did you check the product description on his site? 'Cause it's a bit suspicious - here's the 2nd 'graph:

The Spook Who Sat by the Door is the first release in the new Obsidian Gold Series which is devoted to restoring forgotten Black movie classics. It was an overnight success when it was released in 1973, but every print of the film mysteriously disappeared. The filmmakers say it was suppre

What happened there?? It just dies in the middle of "suppressed."

Same description as on the DVD box: "The filmmakers say it was surpressed by the government." As previously stated, I can fully understand why.

Next paragraph: "Driven underground and available only on bootleg video, this controversial political thriller was nearly lost. Obsidian Home Entertainment was granted full access by the filmmakers to digitally restore the movie from the original camera negative which had been hidden in a Hollywood vault for 30 years."

Edited by utzworld

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huh. A screenwriter I know just came back from it, shrugged, and said, "Meh. It was pleasant, but pretty formulaic. Angela Bassett's character doesn't have much to do until late in the movie." I take it you disagree?

But man, Starbucks is marketing the heck out of this thing. I wonder what they're getting out of it. Was there heavy Starbucks product placement in the film?

Edited by Jeffrey Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huh. A screenwriter I know just came back from it, shrugged, and said, "Meh. It was pleasant, but pretty formulaic. Angela Bassett's character doesn't have much to do until late in the movie." I take it you disagree?

But man, Starbucks is marketing the heck out of this thing. I wonder what they're getting out of it. Was there heavy Starbucks product placement in the film?

Damn the screenwriters! Damn the Starbucks involvement! That movie was the closest thing to my life story than any other movie I've ever seen (next to School Daze)! I can't even "review" this. I'll have to write a commentary instead. Friggin surreal!

Check out The Chicks' review to understand the importance of this "formulaic" little film.

Edited by utzworld

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would love to see it, Chris, but it might be a long drive (up to 3 hours one-way) to a theater where it's playing... I know that might sound far-fetched to some, but much of PA is very rural, and I'm living smack in the middle of it, 3 hours from both Philly and Pittsburgh.

Aaaauuugh! Even Harrisburg is weak on theaters? It's sorta' central, right?


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huh. A screenwriter I know just came back from it, shrugged, and said, "Meh. It was pleasant, but pretty formulaic. Angela Bassett's character doesn't have much to do until late in the movie." I take it you disagree?

I thought Bassett made the movie. It's not a huge part, but she's fiery and dominates the scenes she's in.

The movie is quite good at doing what it wants to do. I'm disappointed that it didn't generate more ticket sales; it's a slam-dunk family film.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure how I missed this a couple weeks ago, but the L.A. Weekly has a new feature article on Charles Burnett, here:

"As this article goes to press, Burnett is in the final editing stages on what may be his most ambitious project to date

Edited by Doug C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Next up: recalling my first time setting foot at Mann's Chinese Theater (to be specific, the smaller theatres that were NEXT to the big one). The movie I saw: Boyz N The Hood.

:spoilers: (since I assume some of y'all might not have ever seen this movie)

Long before Moviefone & Fandango - let alone the internet - hit the mainstream, the Sunday paper was your best source to plan you moviegoing adventures for the following weekend. The Sunday before "Boyz" dropped, the LA Times noted that it was going to play at Mann's Chinese...not the legendary Chinese auditorium, but one of the 2 smaller theatres that adjoined it at the time. It didn't matter to me. Merely 2 years after my memorable first trip to Hollywood - and thanks to having my first car at age 18, I inched my way closer to Chinese a month earlier by seeing Spike's Jungle Fever at another theatre on Hollywood Blvd. Upon seeing that "Starts Friday" ad, I promptly made plans to go to the Mecca of Movie Theatres to see this greatly anticipated film.

I got to the theatre about 11:00 AM for the matinee show. Needless to say, I was psyched and hyped for this. Curtains open, trailers, THX "Audience Is Listening" trailer, and up pops the Columbia Pictures logo with scenes from a drive-by shooting playing underneath. The "Boyz N The Hood" logo title zooms in as the gunshots are fired, followed by the life-expectancy statistics for AA males under 30 then - like a thud - Singleton zooms in on the bright red Stop sign.

Earlier I called DTRT the "scream" of a people. This movie was the mourning, wailing, and finally, hope of those same people. For the first time, life in South Central Los Angeles became more than fodder for network news commentary. The world got to see a glimpse of what life was really like down there. As everyone knows, I lived there during that time. The accuracy of the film is 99.9% - thanks, in a major way, to John Singleton having lived his life there as well. It was as if everyone in the theatre (IIRC, it was about an 80's AA audience in there) had a piece of that story that they could grab a hold of for themselves - even much more personal than DTRT.

Needless to say, (almost) all of us in the theatre that day cried our butts off when

]Ricky (Morris Chestnut) got shot...as I type this, I can still see his passing SAT score in the recesses of my mind. Sad stuff.

I must note that one of the saddest things I've ever witnessed in a movie theatre occured in the midst of the tragedy of

Ricky's shooting, Doughboy's (Ice Cube) post-shooting confrontation with his mother, and Tre's (Cuba Gooding Jr.) breakdown, preparation for retaliation, and confrontation with his father Furious (Laurence Fishburne). As Tre points holds the gun and Furious talks him down,

some kids - who had to have been no more than 12-13 years old, start screaming out "Shoot that nigga!" After about 30 seconds of this nonsensical hollering, an older Brother yells out, "Will y'all shut the ***k up?!?!" The whole theatre erupted in applause. Even sadder when Doughboy

got his revenge

, we cheered like maniacs - I attribute our reaction to Singleton's use of Hollywood style storytelling tricks like suspenseful music and slo-mo shots to set the mood. But with our joyous applause, we the well trained, pre-programmed moviegoing audience, totally undermined the point that Singleton was getting across: that, in real life, these acts of violence and vengeance are a seemingly never-ending spiral of madness and tragedy. Case in point: At the close of the next scene when Doughboy's final outcome was revealed, we all shurgged our shoulders and sighed with sadness.

But hope sprung eternal just a few seconds later: when Tre's final outcome was revealed, we cheered as if he were one of our sons or brothers. When the credits rolled, a bunch of us just sat there soaking it all in, reveling in the fact that we saw the unveiling of a bright future for Mr. John Singleton. It was as if we, just as we did 2 years earlier, were watching history in the making - a history that unfortunately got tarnished just a few hours later when the real life counterparts of Doughboy and his pals wrecked havoc at several theatres across Southern California - including the very same Chinese Theatre I saw the film at earlier in the day.

As for me, I dragged the girl I was seeing at the time kicking and screaming to the local drive-in so she could see the flick later that very night. At the end, she was more emotionally spent and hyped up than I was. I later saw the film about 3 more times before I went off to my freshman year in college. Little did I know that, while I was fighting Algebra, Hollywood was gearing up to make a whole slew of "Boyz" copycats - most inferior, but one definitely superior (IMHO) even to "Boyz" itself.

Edited by utzworld

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since it began junking up its movies with commercials, AMC hasn't been nearly as much fun as it used to be, but lately they're trying to add some original programming of interest to film-buffs. This morning I happened to catch an episode of Movies That Shook the World, which discusses films that influenced movie-making and society. The topic:

D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation. Clips from the film and interviews with film historians, critics, and directors such as Spike Lee, Kasi Lemmons, Roger Ebert, etc. Very interesting--especially to me, as I have never seen the entire film, or even more than one or two scenes from it.

Another movie in the series: Do the Right Thing.


There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The topic:

D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation. Clips from the film and interviews with film historians, critics, and directors such as Spike Lee, Kasi Lemmons, Roger Ebert, etc. Very interesting--especially to me, as I have never seen the entire film, or even more than one or two scenes from it.

I saw about 10 minutes of TBAN a week ago on TCM during their "Race & Hollywood" series. I can't lie...I was "coon-hunting". I found what I was looking for - white actors in Blackface prancing about jus like dem Nigurahs do - and then I turned to Jeopardy...

Another movie in the series: Do the Right Thing.

I'll have to remember to catch that. Particularly Spike's thoughts 20 years later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw about 10 minutes of TBAN a week ago on TCM during their "Race & Hollywood" series. I can't lie...I was "coon-hunting". I found what I was looking for - white actors in Blackface prancing about jus like dem Nigurahs do - and then I turned to Jeopardy...

Yeah, there is that in Birth of a Nation, which could be explained away as early 20th Century view of people of color, but the film can be mined for more that -- not any less racist, in fact it may even be worse. But we probably have a thread on that to discuss it fully.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The topic:

D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation. Clips from the film and interviews with film historians, critics, and directors such as Spike Lee, Kasi Lemmons, Roger Ebert, etc. Very interesting--especially to me, as I have never seen the entire film, or even more than one or two scenes from it.

I saw about 10 minutes of TBAN a week ago on TCM during their "Race & Hollywood" series. I can't lie...I was "coon-hunting". I found what I was looking for - white actors in Blackface prancing about jus like dem Nigurahs do - and then I turned to Jeopardy...

This and other elements of the film are abhorrent--you're absolutely right. The thing I appreciated about the documentary was the way it put the movie in socio-cultural and artistic context. I had not known how Birth of a Nation had influenced both the revival of the virtually defunct KKK (horrifying) and the rise of the NAACP in response. And apparently--as I'm sure everyone but me already knew--Griffith's filmmaking techniques revolutionized Hollywood, in spite of the film's contents, even (or especially?) inspiring contemporary black filmmakers to make their own films & cast their own actors.


There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is interesting:

"Universal Pictures has become the subject of the first racial discrimination case to be brought against a major Hollywood studio by the US government -- a case that prosecutors hope will reveal the injustices in an industry they say is rife with racism and fear."

Details here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I saw, for the first time, "A Patch of Blue" on TCM's "Race & Hollywood" series last night. Wow. Heckuva movie. Had to keep myself from crying a few times while it was on.

Always liked that film, though have not seen it recently. I was out of town for a bit last week.

Before the Race & Hollywood series started, we all were a bit sceptical of many of the choices and the gentleman who chose them. After the fact, what thoughts about his commentary? I know that his comments on Shaft made me see the film in a different light, particularly his reading of the opening credits sequence.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before the Race & Hollywood series started, we all were a bit sceptical of many of the choices and the gentleman who chose them. After the fact, what thoughts about his commentary? I know that his comments on Shaft made me see the film in a different light, particularly his reading of the opening credits sequence.

I got home from Bible Study about 10 minutes after "Shaft" started, and therefore missed Osborne & Bogle (the aformentioned gentleman)'s comments. What did he say? I'm dying to know - after all, we are talking about my favorite movie, here!

I forgot to mention what is arguably one of my proudest moments as a father. I'm holding the baby while watching this - and Ben's face was totally glued to the screen soaking it all in! Now I can dig that!!!

Edited by utzworld

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I got home from Bible Study about 10 minutes after "Shaft" started, and therefore missed Osborne & Bogle (the aformentioned gentleman)'s comments. What did he say? I'm dying to know - after all, we are talking about my favorite movie, here!

I forgot to mention what is arguably one of my proudest moments as a father. I'm holding the baby while watching this - and Ben's face was totally glued to the screen soaking it all in! Now I can dig that!!!

He made a big deal out of the interplay between the tongue-in-cheek-groove of the theme song and this elegantly dressed black man coming out of the subway and striding down old Broadway like he belongs and owns the place.

I never get over Parke's tip of the cap to Ossie Davis though, and both Bogle and Osborne missed it. Long before Shaft passes under the marquee and early in the crane shot, The Scalp Hunters is prominently and brazenly displayed in lights. I've said before that that film was the first one I saw that presented a black man, a runaway slave to boot, who was inventive, intelligent, and not completely beholden to a white man, but was willing to challenge white men if necessary. Shaft is from a great chain of film character being descended in part from that character.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never get over Parke's tip of the cap to Ossie Davis though, and both Bogle and Osborne missed it. Long before Shaft passes under the marquee and early in the crane shot, The Scalp Hunters is prominently and brazenly displayed in lights. I've said before that that film was the first one I saw that presented a black man, a runaway slave to boot, who was inventive, intelligent, and not completely beholden to a white man, but was willing to challenge white men if necessary. Shaft is from a great chain of film character being descended in part from that character.

I doubt that the film on the marquee was an intentional "tip of the cap". It was probably just a coincidence - that movie may very well have been playing at that theatre when that shot was filmed. In fact, a fun game that I play when I watch it again (maybe 5-6 times a year) is spotting all the films shown on the various theatre marquee. One marquee has a double feature of "Patton" and "M*A*S*H*". I even managed to spot "Cotton Comes To Harlem" on one marquee while watching the TCM airing.

Ah, he just liked all the movement and noise, Chris. ^_* [supposed to be an approximation of a wink!]

Naah...he even stared during the early cop banter. Don't steal my joy!!! ::w00t::

Edited by utzworld

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...