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Kyle

Favorite Board Games

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Anyone here played Ticket To Ride? It's a great board game that I became a fan of this Christmas with my wife's family. The Europe edition is better than the US one. And I'm interested in trying the German (Macklin) edition. Lots of fun. Anyone else ever played?

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Anyone here played Ticket To Ride? It's a great board game that I became a fan of this Christmas with my wife's family. The Europe edition is better than the US one. And I'm interested in trying the German (Macklin) edition. Lots of fun. Anyone else ever played?

The German edition is by far the best. (Not that the US one is bad, but...) This is easily one of my favorite games! It doesn't require much time to get into, but there's plenty of depth to it.

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The Mrs. and I *love* Ticket to Ride. It works well as a multi-player game and a two-player game. I got the Europe edition for my birthday, and I am not sure if I think that the additions to it (tunnels, train stations) are improvements or just complications. But I enjoy playing it.

We just got Blokus, as well, and are enjoying that a great deal, especially with four players.

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The version of Bang! that I have (core game + all expansions + sheriff's badge + giant metal bullet to store it in):

The German version of Ticket to Ride

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I like Ticket to Ride a great deal. We have (or had, it's been since misplaced) the US edition. I like it in its two-player mode because it's a game the wife and I can play without getting too upset with each other.

Our friends have the European version and I really like it, although we've only played it once. I like the foreignness of the map as well as the added strategy of the tunnels. All in all, its well done.

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Got three games for Christmas:

Puerto Rico (the rules are TERRIBLY written, but the game is great)

Imaginiff (haven't played this yet)

China Rails

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Played a game called Bohnanza this past week. It's incredible; it's a card game where you trade / sell beans of various types. Here's a link at the Board Game Geek website that explains it further. It's a LOT of fun.

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The Mrs. and I *love* Ticket to Ride. It works well as a multi-player game and a two-player game. I got the Europe edition for my birthday, and I am not sure if I think that the additions to it (tunnels, train stations) are improvements or just complications. But I enjoy playing it.

We just got Blokus, as well, and are enjoying that a great deal, especially with four players.

Every time we play Ticket to Ride, one of my friends never fails to say, "I love this game; I always think I'm gonna win!" I think that is probably the best thing about it. It's rare that anyone will feel like they're completely hopeless, as can happen with Catan and others.

I've only played the Europe and Germany versions a hand full of times but I think I like them both better than the American one. I find we now grow tired of the American one pretty quickly after playing it a bunch over the past year.

I've also been itchin' to get Blokus.

Got three games for Christmas:

Puerto Rico (the rules are TERRIBLY written, but the game is great)

Imaginiff (haven't played this yet)

China Rails

I like Puerto Rico but it took me a few games before I could really think about strategy at all. Seemed really complicated at first.

I'd be curious to hear about China Rails.

Played a game called Bohnanza this past week. It's incredible; it's a card game where you trade / sell beans of various types. Here's a link at the Board Game Geek website that explains it further. It's a LOT of fun.

My group of friends was as wowed by Bohnanza at first as you seemed to be. We even named our soccer team after it. But it has fallen out of favor. I'm not sure if it's any flaw of the game's or just that some of my friends take things too personally in any sort of trading game.

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Every time we play Ticket to Ride, one of my friends never fails to say, "I love this game; I always think I'm gonna win!" I think that is probably the best thing about it. It's rare that anyone will feel like they're completely hopeless, as can happen with Catan and others.

I've only played the Europe and Germany versions a hand full of times but I think I like them both better than the American one. I find we now grow tired of the American one pretty quickly after playing it a bunch over the past year.

I've seen some amazing wins in Ticket to Ride; we were playing a game where my friends' wife was behind by, say, well over a hundred points, and then she jumped ahead to beat everyone.

My group of friends was as wowed by Bohnanza at first as you seemed to be. We even named our soccer team after it. But it has fallen out of favor. I'm not sure if it's any flaw of the game's or just that some of my friends take things too personally in any sort of trading game.

Maybe people just get tired of beans.

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Every time we play Ticket to Ride, one of my friends never fails to say, "I love this game; I always think I'm gonna win!" I think that is probably the best thing about it. It's rare that anyone will feel like they're completely hopeless, as can happen with Catan and others.

That's one of the things Mrs. CrimsonLine likes about it. She hates in Catan when it's clear from early on that she's going to lose, and she knows she still has over an hour of playtime left. It's discouraging.

We love Catan, but that's a sad feature of the game.

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That's one of the things Mrs. CrimsonLine likes about it. She hates in Catan when it's clear from early on that she's going to lose, and she knows she still has over an hour of playtime left. It's discouraging.

We love Catan, but that's a sad feature of the game.

This is a very unspiritual reading, but I sometimes relate a poor start in Catan to being born in poverty. Due to an allocation of resources, some will exceed, seemingly no matter what they do, while others will live, but struggle in frustration until the stupid game is over.

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Every time we play Ticket to Ride, one of my friends never fails to say, "I love this game; I always think I'm gonna win!" I think that is probably the best thing about it. It's rare that anyone will feel like they're completely hopeless, as can happen with Catan and others.

That's one of the things Mrs. CrimsonLine likes about it. She hates in Catan when it's clear from early on that she's going to lose, and she knows she still has over an hour of playtime left. It's discouraging.

We love Catan, but that's a sad feature of the game.

That's funny in Catan, my wife complains that I, and another playing mate, always complain "my positions suck. There is no way I can win" and end up winning more often then anyone else.

However, there are those days, especially when playing with 6, that you literally have no place to go and you're stuck buying a development card every turn.

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However, there are those days, especially when playing with 6, that you literally have no place to go and you're stuck buying a development card every turn.

Kyle, I need to tell you how my friend has developed a way to always play with a six player board, even though there are only four players. Ah... the space to roam and expand. It is the Manifest Destiny of Catan.

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I play games differently than most people; I've been in that "losing from the start" situation with Settlers countless times, so I usually just resort to trying to become a wheat baron or something equally asinine (intentionally trade for stuff I don't need so I can lose the most cards to the robber, etc.) and end up having a blast.

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However, there are those days, especially when playing with 6, that you literally have no place to go and you're stuck buying a development card every turn.

Kyle, I need to tell you how my friend has developed a way to always play with a six player board, even though there are only four players. Ah... the space to roam and expand. It is the Manifest Destiny of Catan.

We never play with the small board if we can help it. Big board always. Three people on a big board is AWESOME. Although it turns out the competition for space is pretty awesome.

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Every time we play Ticket to Ride, one of my friends never fails to say, "I love this game; I always think I'm gonna win!" I think that is probably the best thing about it. It's rare that anyone will feel like they're completely hopeless, as can happen with Catan and others.

That's one of the things Mrs. CrimsonLine likes about it. She hates in Catan when it's clear from early on that she's going to lose, and she knows she still has over an hour of playtime left. It's discouraging.

We love Catan, but that's a sad feature of the game.

Agreed. Catan is far too luck-driven, and turn order is absolutely crucial. If you want a family-type game that isn't too difficult to understand but that has serious strategies that only reveal themselves with repeated play, you should consider Reiner Knizia's masterpiece "Modern Art". The game sounds drab, looks terrible, but plays like a dream.

Amazingly, it's still in print from Mayfair Games. Here's the link (you can probably pick it up cheaper if you shop around):

Modern Art

And here's a review of the game.

Modern Art also makes very good use of a core game mechanic that you don't see in a lot of games: the prisoner's dilemma. The central idea of the dilemma is that if all players take a certain tactic, they'll all benefit from it, but by breaking away from the mob an individual can make a personal profit. This is exactly what happens when you're bidding to win a painting from another player. As a group, you don't want to bid more than half the value of a painting, because to do so gives the auctioneer more money than the bidder will earn, but when an individual person does so, he still betters his position versus everyone else in the group but the auctioneer; it's a constant struggle.

Edited by The Invisible Man

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Has anyone played the Killer Bunnies card game? It's hard to find a frame of reference, but it's a pretty interesting game with lots of different possibilities.

Basically you have to collect as many of the 12-24 carrots (depending on how many expansion packs you have) during the game, and then at the end of the game you find out which of the carrots is lucky. So doing well during the game increases your odds of winning, but you can still win without doing very well. To win you have to keep some of your rabbits alive, so gameplay involves attacking other peoples bunnies with weapons and kitchen appliances.

http://www.killerbunnies.com/

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Has anyone played the Killer Bunnies card game? It's hard to find a frame of reference, but it's a pretty interesting game with lots of different possibilities.

Trout, I've played this game a bunch with several of the expansion packs.

My thoughts: while I've had some fun with it, and I kind of like being able to win even if you suck, and the final revelation of the winning carrot is always a blast, ultimately I think the game is too complex. That is, there are too many special cards that you have to read every time unless you play it A LOT. And if you don't remember all the cards you can't really develop a great strategy.

I think though that the multiplicity of goofy cards is what some people really love about Killer Bunnies, so it may be worth a try. My friends certainly like it a lot more than I.

I do really like how, at least in our games, people latch onto their favorite carrots and always try to get them. My friend and I have a cutthroat rivalry over Seth :)

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IM, Modern Art looks wonderful. My friends opened a book/game store recently, so I might see if they can get it in (as of now, they only carry Mayfair games).

Has anyone played Memoir '44? I've been interested in this for the past few years, but still want to investigate it a bit more before I buy. Specifically, how easy is it for non-WWII fans to get into?

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Last year among the nerdiest of board-gamers -- the kind that go to conferences -- one game held the spotlight all year: Agricola. Demand has been so great that, until recently, it has been nearly impossible for the slightly-more-than-casual gamer to get his hands on it.

I just got my hands on it.

I've only played it once but I'm very excited about it. It's fairly complex (ie. took us almost an hour to get a good enough grasp on the rules to start playing) but once we got going it was really fun. I certainly don't have strategy down but by the end of the game all players were comfortable enough to enjoy it.

It was pretty expensive ($70) but it seems like there are plenty of variations and expansions within the game itself that it will stay fresh for a long time. It is also playable by 1-5 players, which is nice.

If you like Puerto Rico you'll probably like Agricola.

Here's a description from BoardGameNews.com:

In Agricola, you're a farmer in a wooden shack with your spouse and little else. On a turn, you get to take only two actions, one for you and one for the spouse, from all the possibilities you'll find on a farm: collecting clay, wood, or stone; building fences; and so on. You might think about having kids in order to get more work accomplished, but first you need to expand your house. And what are you going to feed all the little rugrats?

The rules include a beginner's version and an advanced version.

Agricola is a turn-based game. There are 14 game turns plus 6 harvest phases (after turn 4, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 14).

Each player starts with two playing tokens (farmer and wife) and thus can take two actions per turn. There are multiple options, and while the game progresses, you'll have more and more: first thing in a turn, a new action card is flipped over.

Problem: Each action can be taken just once per turn, so it's important to do some things with high preference.

Each player also starts with a hand of 7 job cards (of more than 160 total) and 7 item cards (of more than 140 total) that he/she may use during the game if they fit in his/her strategy. Speaking of: there are countless strategies, some depending on your card hand. Sometimes it's a good choice to stay on course, sometimes you better react on what your opponents do.

I'll update my impressions as I play it a little more.

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Whoa. That sounds incredible. Is it readily available around the world?

I'm going to continue to plug Arkham Horror as a game. It's fairly expensive ($50), and there are currently four optional expansions (two big-box ones at $40 each and two smaller ones at $20 each).

The game is based on the writings of H.P. Lovecraft, the eccentric guy that influenced everyone from Stephen King to Neil Gaiman. For the record, his stories are really hit or miss, his creativity was just jaw-dropping.

It's for 1

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I stumbled on "Wordthief" at our block sale. A card game owinf a debt to Scrabble, all are dealt seven cards. One card turned up as "Trump". The rest is a "kitty". Bonus for longest word per round and for most words. Suits are significant. Multi-suit words can be stolen to make words of your own. The original wordcrafter loses the letter points, not any bonuses. Flushes are locked and double scored. Trump flush words are triple score. Game ends when no cards are left to draw and someone runs out of cards. Our addiction to this game has spawned a quest for other word games.

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Alright, I went through this entire thread hoping to see a couple of posts about who was the greatest player at achieving total world domination. But imagine how shocked I was not to see a single post about RISK....

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Alright, I went through this entire thread hoping to see a couple of posts about who was the greatest player at achieving total world domination. But imagine how shocked I was not to see a single post about RISK....

Risk is a great game, but it's one I can only handle in small doses. I think I've gotten hooked by more German-style board games in the past year or two, so Risk is also, uh, seeming sort of tame in comparison. (Don't hit me, please! :D )

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This year, I have been the benefactor of a strengthening friendship with an absolute board-game nut. He claims 75% of his possessions are games! And when he goes away this summer for work, <cue maniacal laughter> my home becomes his storehouse. 'twill be a superlatively gamey summer.

Without further ado, a new fave:

Dominion - For 2-4 players. It is essentially a customizable card game (CCG) but since it includes all the necessary cards, you can forgo all the collecting and trading nonsense. I hear there is an expansion in the works but I don't expect the quantity of expansions to get out of hand. The game doesn't need them. At least not for a long while. My wife and I played it every dinnertime for almost an entire month and didn't get tired of it.

From Board Game Geek:

In Dominion, each player starts with an identical, very small deck of cards. In the center of the table is a selection of other cards the players can "buy" as they can afford them. Through their selection of cards to buy, and how they play their hands as they draw them, the players construct their deck on the fly, striving for the most efficient path to the precious victory points by game end.

Every game is different or can be, based on which 10 (of 30 or so) action cards you choose to play with. It's also a quick play with games typically lasting less than half an hour. I highly recommend it for anyone even mildly interested in games.

I'll be back soon to share a few more new discoveries.

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