Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Overstreet

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote (2018)

Recommended Posts

Just in case anyone's interested, we sort of had a thread on Lost in La Mancha in July, but it ended up being mostly about The Last Temptation of Christ.

Link to our thread on Joel Silver's Don Quixote.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The dream lives on.

"[Producer] Jeremy Thomas is very close to getting all the pieces of paper signed from all the people who you gotta get signed," Gilliam told us. "He

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:(

Depp Pulls Out Of Don Quixote Movie

6 August 2009 1:16 AM, PDT

Johnny Depp has pulled out of starring in a movie about Spanish literary legend Don Quixote - after a series of disasters delayed the filming schedule by a decade.

Eccentric director Terry Gilliam lined up Depp and Jean Rochefort to appear in the film back in 2000, and his attempts to make The Man Who Killed Don Quixote were chronicled by filmmakers Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe in 2002 movie Lost in La Mancha.

The filming of the oddball epic was set back by scheduling and financial issues and weather-damaged sets, but Gilliam has always been adamant the project will go ahead with Depp on board.

Rochefort pulled out of the movie after suffering a herniated disc - and now the Pirates of the Caribbean actor has followed suit, due to scheduling conflicts.

Gilliam, 68, says, "I can now honestly say that I'm not working with Johnny on Don Quixote. He's booked himself up on a lot of other films.

"I wanted to shoot Don Quixote next spring. He said he's not available and we have both agreed that I'm going to die soon, so it would be nice to get this film under my belt."

Depp was among the movie stars who stepped in to help Gilliam complete his film The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus after Heath Ledger's death last year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Drew McWeeny @ Hitfix:

As I spoke with Robert Duvall, a real treat for anyone who has grown up on the films of this remarkable character actor, I asked him what projects he had coming up, either as a producer or as an actor, and he dropped a bombshell on me that I totally wasn't expecting.

"I'm talking to Terry Gilliam about that film of his... I'm going to play Quixote for him."

Wha wha WHA!? . . .

Robert Duvall is a positively inspired choice, and according to Duvall, it was the film "Wrestling Ernest Hemingway," where he played a Cuban, that got Gilliam thinking about him in the first place. They've spoken a few times now, and if Terry can put the money together to make the film, then it sound like Duvall wants the role and likes Gilliam, and there's a good chance we're going to see him saddle up and make the movie. . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Duvall is undoubtedly a fitting choice, but frankly, I'm really tired of seeing him in films; he seems to have used up most of his range as an actor. I hope he surprises me, but I feel that I already know exactly what his Don Quixote will be (it's the same way I felt when I heard Depp was going to play the Mad Hatter).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At this point I'd kind of like to see Gilliam himself play Don Quixote. Julie Taymor could direct it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Terry Gilliam’s Big New Idea For The Man Who Killed Don Quixote Mk 2

The first big change has already been reported: McGregor’s Grosini is to be a screenwriter of movies, not an ad man. Here’s the second, fundamental difference though: this time, there’s to be no scenes set in period Spain. All of the scenes with Quixote and Grosini as his Sancho Panza are to be set in the here-and-now.

This has several interesting implications, one of which is that Gilliam’s film is now even more drastically distanced from Joel Silver’s proposed blockbuster version of the story. In the big-budget (most likely dumbed down) version Silver is cooking up, Quixote is “not a mad man” but everything he imagines in the novel is instead rendered as quite literal and real. This is a spectacularly daft idea, removing absolutely everything from the Quixote story that makes it at all interesting. What we’re going to be left with, says Silver, is something akin to those Pirates of the Caribbean films.

With this second iteration of his story, Gilliam’s needle has swung even further in the opposite direction to Silver’s. Gilliam and co-writer Tony Grisoni are leaping headlong into a blend of imagination and delusion without the safety net of “is it or isn’t it real?” . . .

Bleeding Cool, June 29

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

::depressed::

From Variety...

Terry Gilliam's "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote" has experienced more than the "hiccup" reported in August. "The financing collapsed about a month and a half ago," the helmer said Saturday at the Deauville American Film Festival. "I shouldn't be here. The plan was to be shooting 'Quixote' right now." Even so, he still wants to push on with the project. "Robert Duval is Quixote, Ewan McGregor is also there, and we are looking for new financing right now," he said. Gilliam has been trying to make the film for decades. Previous attempts to shoot were memorably captured in Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe's 2002 doc "Lost in La Mancha." Despite this latest set-back, the helmer said he still didn't believe in the "curse of Quixote." "Don Quixote gives me something to look forward to, always. Maybe the most frightening thing is to actually make the film." Gilliam is a guest of honor at the festival, which runs until Sept. 12. A complete retrospective of his work as a director kicked off Friday with 1985's "Brazil," which was also the fest's opening film. Gilliam confessed to a weird feeling of deja-vu on seeing his name on the film. "Whoever that guy was, I envy him, because he had a lot more energy than I do now," he said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe Duval should produce and finance it. I volunteer for the starring role. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here’s the second, fundamental difference though: this time, there’s to be no scenes set in period Spain. All of the scenes with Quixote and Grosini as his Sancho Panza are to be set in the here-and-now. This has several interesting implications, one of which is that Gilliam’s film is now even more drastically distanced from Joel Silver’s proposed blockbuster version of the story ... With this second iteration of his story, Gilliam’s needle has swung even further in the opposite direction to Silver’s. Gilliam and co-writer Tony Grisoni are leaping headlong into a blend of imagination and delusion without the safety net of “is it or isn’t it real?” . . . Bleeding Cool, June 29

I've got to wonder if Gilliam has by any chance read G.K. Chesterton's The Return of Don Quixote. Like the direction Gilliam seems to now have in mind (a Don Quixote in modern day times), Chesterton's book is essentially the same thing (except his modern times were set in the late 1920s). The two main characters Herne and Murrell, are a librarian (who after donning the medieval character and costume of Richard the Lion-Heart for a play, suddenly refuses to step out of character after the play is finished) and a noble (who much prefers the company of the poor in the streets and pubs to the company of his fellow aristocrats). Instead of tilting windmills, they get caught up in conflicts resulting from a labor union strike, and a mentally-unhinged merchant who has been condemned to an insane asylum for his own benefit by men of science. Contrary to modern social conventions, they take up medieval law and rules of chivalry against modern regulations of business and science. Ever since I read the book years ago, I always wondered what a modern day director could do with the story - set in, oh say, modern day New York City. If Gilliam is taking even a tiny bit of his inspiration from Chesterton's story, this could get really interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ever since I read the book years ago, I always wondered what a modern day director could do with the story - set in, oh say, modern day New York City.

I suspect it would remind me of a little movie called The Fisher King. :)

Seriously though, replace Parry's Round Table delusions with Quixotic delusions, and you could make almost the same movie. Lydia was Parry's Dulcinea. The Red Knight was his windmill... the doctors were his Inquisition.

It's Man of La Mancha all over again.

Edited by Overstreet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Orson Welles' DON QUIXOTE was also set in modern day. Supposedly, its greatest moment featured Quixote charging images on a movie screen.

Edited by Ryan H.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read through the original shooting script for THE MAN WHO KILLED DON QUIXOTE, and I have to say, it's probably for the best that the project didn't happen. That iteration of the screenplay was a bit, well, boring, using the Don Quixote material in over-familiar ways. Even THE IMAGINARIUM OF DOCTOR PARNASSUS, which is hardly among the heights of Gilliam's work, was a much more vivid, interesting read.

I'm encouraged by the news that all of the new version of DON QUIXOTE will be modern day, because it means that practically eighty to ninety percent of what I read won't make it into the film. And since the main character is now a screenwriter, I suspect that the remaining ten to twenty percent won't make the cut, either. We actually might have something really worth seeing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×