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Hugues   

No disappointment upon the first listen of two favorites of mine's latest recordings: Devon Sproule's I Love You, Go Easy and Jolie Holland's Pint of Blood. Both keep satisfy me with their personal artistry. They're both dedicated to their art, and use their voice and music to venture into worlds of feelings. Both seem to keep the inspired thread that they had as early as their first album. Especially Jolie, who never sounded more raw since her first. If I have more to say i'll go to their respective threads on this forum.

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The Olabelle album, which Jurek spoke highly of earlier in this thread, is streaming via NPR.

Thought I'd chime in and say that the Ollabelle record is a thing of beauty-- and is probably one of my favorite "Americana" released of the year. I put it in quotes because the album has a lot less to do with the folksy/twangy conceptions that tend to accompany the Americana label, more to do with R&B rhythms, gospel harmonies, and sensational grooves. Really a lovely record, and easily the best thing Ollabelle has yet done, I think.

I wish I could get more excited about this album, because all the component parts are tasteful and intelligent: well-written originals, surprising covers (Chris Whitley!), and radical reinventions of hoary American classics ("Swanee River"). Alas, it's still Ollabelle, which to me means tasteful bordering on nap inducing. It's the Raising Sand of 2011. It's all a little too smooth and sedate for me. I agree that there are new (for Ollabelle) R&B grooves here. But it sounds like R&B from the Holiday Inn Lounge, a sort of unobtrusive but mildly spunky soundtrack for the Rib Eye and Baked Potato set. I keep waiting for something, anything to bust loose, and it never happens.

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The Olabelle album, which Jurek spoke highly of earlier in this thread, is streaming via NPR.

Thought I'd chime in and say that the Ollabelle record is a thing of beauty-- and is probably one of my favorite "Americana" released of the year. I put it in quotes because the album has a lot less to do with the folksy/twangy conceptions that tend to accompany the Americana label, more to do with R&B rhythms, gospel harmonies, and sensational grooves. Really a lovely record, and easily the best thing Ollabelle has yet done, I think.

I wish I could get more excited about this album, because all the component parts are tasteful and intelligent: well-written originals, surprising covers (Chris Whitley!), and radical reinventions of hoary American classics ("Swanee River"). Alas, it's still Ollabelle, which to me means tasteful bordering on nap inducing. It's the Raising Sand of 2011. It's all a little too smooth and sedate for me. I agree that there are new (for Ollabelle) R&B grooves here. But it sounds like R&B from the Holiday Inn Lounge, a sort of unobtrusive but mildly spunky soundtrack for the Rib Eye and Baked Potato set. I keep waiting for something, anything to bust loose, and it never happens.

I can't disagree with any of what you say, Andy. The R&B influences are indeed, as you say, tasteful-- this isn't a party album, not a banger, but a smooth and polished collection through and through. There's nothing here that I'd call spontaneous, or anything less than elegantly but carefully orchestrated. But I still think it's really beautiful-- the grooves are smooth but, for me, compelling; the harmonies are sublime; and the production, while restrained and perhaps a bit sleepy, emphasizes all the things that this band does well.

I might be more excited about it than I was Raising Sand, actually.

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Guest Thom Jurek   
Guest Thom Jurek

Loren Connors- Red Mars (Minimal guitarist's first new studio work in seven years, and a compelling new direction)

John Fahey: Your Past Comes Back To Haunt You (The Fonotone Years: 1958-1965) All of John Fahey's recordings for the label (five CDs worth)--most of them 78 rpms--assembled and exhaustively edited by Glenn Jones of Cul De Sac. He spent 11 years putting this together for Dust To Digital.

Hisato Higuchi - Henzai

VARIOUS - West Indies Funk 3 (Trans Air/ Music For Pleasure left the best volume for last in this amazing series)

Lucas Santtana - Sem Nostalgia New album by Brazilian singer songwriter with production help from Arto Lindsay is the best example of the new sound of Brazil, which is deep, murky, expansive, quirky and funky.

Miles Davis Quintet - Live In Europe 1967: Bootleg Series, Volume 1 Sony Legacy issues fantastic sounding double CD., plus DVD package of of Davis' last great quintet--Shorter/Hancock/Carter/Williams playing the Newport Fesitval live in Europe.

Remi Kabaka - Black Goddess Soundtrack for Ola Balogun's film finally released.

Various - This May Be My Last Time Singing : Raw African-American Gospel on 45RPM (1957-1982) Forthcoming from Tompkins Square

Various - A Nova Musica Brasileira! Fantastic (and budget-priced) overview of the new sounds of Brasil that reflects influences as wide ranging as Massive Attack and Portishead on one side and Sonic youth and Stereolab on the other.

Gold Beach - Habibti On SP Productions imprint. Houston's Mchael Winningham and Tony Daugherty with a host of Austin musicians helping out. Look this one up.

Edited by Thom Jurek

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Loren Connors- Red Mars (Minimal guitarist's first new studio work in seven years, and a compelling new direction)

This is great news. Loren Connors is a superb, creative guitarist.

John Fahey: Your Past Comes Back To Haunt You (The Fonotone Years: 1958-1965) All of John Fahey's recordings for the label (five CDs worth)--most of them 78 rpms--assembled and exhaustively edited by Glenn Jones of Cul De Sac. He spent 11 years putting this together for Dust To Digital.

What? Wow, I didn't know that Fahey recorded before the mid-'60s. I'm extremely excited to hear this.

Various - This May Be My Last Time Singing : Raw African-American Gospel on 45RPM (1957-1982) Forthcoming from Tompkins Square

And wow again. This is brought to you by the same folks who brought you the superb 3-disc gospel set Fire In My Bones a couple years back.

Thanks, Thom. There's some great music there.

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Guest Thom Jurek   
Guest Thom Jurek

Loren Connors- Red Mars (Minimal guitarist's first new studio work in seven years, and a compelling new direction)

This is great news. Loren Connors is a superb, creative guitarist.

My link

John Fahey: Your Past Comes Back To Haunt You (The Fonotone Years: 1958-1965) All of John Fahey's recordings for the label (five CDs worth)--most of them 78 rpms--assembled and exhaustively edited by Glenn Jones of Cul De Sac. He spent 11 years putting this together for Dust To Digital.

What? Wow, I didn't know that Fahey recorded before the mid-'60s. I'm extremely excited to hear this.

My link

Various - This May Be My Last Time Singing : Raw African-American Gospel on 45RPM (1957-1982) Forthcoming from Tompkins Square

And wow again. This is brought to you by the same folks who brought you the superb 3-disc gospel set Fire In My Bones a couple years back.

My link

PRESS RELEASE:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

'This May Be My Last Time Singing : Raw African-American Gospel on 45RPM (1957-1982)' out on Tompkins Square September 20th, 2011

The follow-up to the best-selling historical gospel comp 'Fire in My Bones : Raw + Rare + Otherworldly African-American Gospel, 1944-2007'

97.jpg

Get ready for fiery sanctified soul, heavy Pentecostal jams, drum machine gospel, slow-burning moaners, glorified guitar sermons and righteously ragged a cappela hymns! The music on this compilation was originally released on small label 45s, mostly in the 1960s and '70s. At least one-third of the records were self-released, paid for by a church congregation or the artists themselves. Others were on regional labels (typically run by one single producer) little known today outside of a small circle of collectors. This vibrant music is incredibly honest and almost criminally unknown.

All tracks were sourced from 45s collected over the last decade by compiler Mike McGonigal, who also produced 2009's three disc set Fire in My Bones: Raw + Rare + Otherworldly African-American Gospel (1944-2007) for Tompkins Square. McGonigal, who has compiled records for Mississippi Records and his own Social Music label, lives in Portland, OR where he is the editorial director for Yeti Publications. He writes in the liner notes that he "chose to source this compilation entirely from 45s because of their democratic/DIY nature; almost anyone could raise enough money to release a seven-inch single."

"Maybe you'll feel like I did on first hearing these tracks, that you've stumbled in on someone else's tenderly private moment. Or that you've been swept up in a collective delirium. You'll hear deep soulfulness here, with heavy admixtures of rhythm and blues and rock'n'roll. There are echoes of '60s and '70s pop too. You'll also catch bits of country and western, and something like surf guitar. In another way, much here uncannily resembles the unruly sound and spirit of 1960s garage. Give yourself over to this compilation: there's delight and surprise in every track."

-PETER DOYLE, author of Echo and Reverb: Fabricating Space in Popular Music Recording, 1900-1960; The Devil's Jump and Crooks Like Us

TSQ2639 Distributed by Fontana in the US, Cargo UK for Europe, FUSE for Australia

Thanks, Thom. There's some great music there.

You're welcome Andy; I had a feeling a couple of these titles might grab you in particular.

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Guest Thom Jurek   
Guest Thom Jurek

Forgot one:

Meg Baird - Seasons On Earth First new solo recording by Espers vocalist in four years and easily her most accessible, great singers and players on this one. Drag City: September 6.

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opus   

I raved about Jay Tholen's previous album an awful lot, and he's returned with a new one titled Mud Pies or Bread and Wine? It's a little rough around the edges -- Tholen even describes it as "loose" and "crusty" -- but I'm really enjoying it. Not as blatantly electronic or chiptune-y as his earlier stuff, though those elements are definitely in full effect. But it's still an incredibly charming release, due in large part to Tholen's squeaky voice and the bizarre array of lo-fi sounds that permeate the album. The album is most definitely a praise and worship album, but probably one of the most skewed and offbeat ones you'll hear all year. But that does nothing to lessen its sincerity.

You can listen to, and download, the entire thing here.

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Guest Thom Jurek   
Guest Thom Jurek

Jamie Saft - Borscht Belt Studies on Tzadik. 11 new compositions with Saft playing simply his piano (acoustic and Rhodes) in solo, duet (with Ben Goldberg) and a piece with his new band New Zion Trio with bassist Larry grenadier and drummer Craig Santiago. beautiful pieces.

Darondo - Listen To My Song: The Music City Sessions (His "lost"--well, unreleased anyway-- 70s sides for two different album length recordings by the Bay area's Music City imprint. Killer vintage funk.) released by BGP/Ace

Omar Souleyman - Haflat Gharbia: The Western Concerts. First U.S. released live album by the great Syrian folk pop sensation whose brand of Dabke has been a sensation at everything from weddings to raves.

Allen Toussaint - The Wild Sound Of New Orleans (reissue of Toussaint's debut instrumental album from 1958, when he was still concentrating on being a stomping piano player in the Crecscent City rhythm and Blues lineage--includes the original instrumental versions of tunes that would become hits for singers including "Workingin a Coalmine," "Ride Your Pony," "Java," "Fortune Teller," "Mother-In-Law," and "Look A Py Py." Lots of dispute as to who the other players are on saxophones and guitars, though Dr. John claims it was drummer Earl Palmer, himself on guitar, and Alvin "Red Tyler" on tenor saxophone.

Mickey Newbury - An American Trilogy (re-released in a cheaper--half priced- though no less handsome package with a 10 panel digipack foldout for the four discs--Looks Like Rain, ' Frisco Mabel Joy, and Heaven Help The Child, with a bonus disc of very notable rarities. The book is smaller, and that's fine since there was a lot of extra self serving crap in it by writers--and it has no mapo/lyric sheet and you don't needd a lyric sheet because Newbury sang as clear as a bell.

Simon Fisher Turner - The Great White Silence (double CD of the score to HerbertPonting's 1911 film).

James Elkington and Nathan Salzburg - Avos

Forced Exposure's description (but I love this album)

"Albums of guitar duets are rare. Albums of guitar duets featuring oneAmerican and one Englishman, synthesizing their geo¬graphically specificapproaches in a collection of new compositions, are rarer. Not since StefanGrossman and John Renbourn's partnerships of the 1970s has there been such ahappy reconciliation of Merrie Old England and the good old USA, in whichbaroque meets the blues, music-hall steps out to ragtime, and Benjamin Brittensits down with Blind Blake."

Bio Ritmo - La Verdad (New album on FatBeats)

DJ Shadow - The Less You Know, The Better (debut on Verve????!!!!)

M83 - Hurry Up We're Dreaming! New double CD studio offering from Anthony Gonsalez, produced by Justin Medal-Jackson.

Various - Our Latin Thing (Nuestra Cosa) Two CD single DVD documenting the legendary film athe two Live at the Cheetah volumes that put Nuyorican salsa in the American mainstream for a minute. Excellent performances by The Fania All Stars-- Ray Barretto, Willie Colon, Larry Harlow, Hector Lavoe, Pete Rodriguez, Johnny Pacheco, Bobby Valentin and many more. I believe the NY times did something on this yesterday.

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Greg P   

Please someone, make my week and tell me this last Glen Campbell album is haunting, beautiful and deep. I heard the title track over the weekend and thought it was excellent-- very evocative of his late 60's/early 70's singles. Anyone?

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Please someone, make my week and tell me this last Glen Campbell album is haunting, beautiful and deep. I heard the title track over the weekend and thought it was excellent-- very evocative of his late 60's/early 70's singles. Anyone?

Wish I could, Greg. There is some very moving stuff, but the whole album is rather gaudy and overproduced. (The phrase "all the bells and whistles" applies quite literally.) Further, it fetishizes and senimentalizes death in a way that even the final Johnny Cash albums never did. There are some moving moments and a surprisingly good cover of a Jakob Dylan song, but I can't help but wish it was a more intimate and small-scale affair.

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Greg P   

Please someone, make my week and tell me this last Glen Campbell album is haunting, beautiful and deep. I heard the title track over the weekend and thought it was excellent-- very evocative of his late 60's/early 70's singles. Anyone?

Wish I could, Greg. There is some very moving stuff, but the whole album is rather gaudy and overproduced. (The phrase "all the bells and whistles" applies quite literally.) Further, it fetishizes and senimentalizes death in a way that even the final Johnny Cash albums never did. There are some moving moments and a surprisingly good cover of a Jakob Dylan song, but I can't help but wish it was a more intimate and small-scale affair.

Thanks, Josh. Ugh.

But then again, Glen has never really done "intimate" and small-scale-- a huge part of his legacy is the admittedly drippy countrypolitan strings and melodramatic pop production. Unlike Cash, there's never been an ounce of grit in Campbell's music. Mostly syrup. I, for one, love that about him. So maybe I won't be disappointed after all...?

Edited by Greg P

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Perhaps so, Greg. My CT review-- coming tomorrow-- is 3 stars, so it's not like I think it's a terrible album. That said, I quite like Campbell, and enjoyed his last album (Meet Glen Campbell) immensely, whereas this one just strikes me as a bit too cloying in its "last will and testament" sentiment, something that's probably caused by arrangements and lyrics in equal measure.

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Hugues   

A lot of new records by some familiar roots artists are being released this month (got a newsletter from Village Records). A few of them are interesting me, if some of you, reviewers, can tell me a bit about: Connie Smith (her second album since 1978)? Is she still magic? Ana Egge (she didn't really thrill me since Out Past the Lights but you never know)? Robert Earl Keen? Well, I love some songs of this man, but not everything. I guess I could wait for the AMG reviews, but I remain curious meanwhile...

Thanks Thom! So I'll buy it.

I've also purchased the new Dave Alvin one.

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Hugues   

A lot of new records by some familiar roots artists are being released this month (got a newsletter from Village Records). A few of them are interesting me, if some of you, reviewers, can tell me a bit about: Connie Smith (her second album since 1978)? Is she still magic? Ana Egge (she didn't really thrill me since Out Past the Lights but you never know)? Robert Earl Keen? Well, I love some songs of this man, but not everything. I guess I could wait for the AMG reviews, but I remain curious meanwhile...

Thanks Thom! So I'll buy it.

I've also purchased the new Dave Alvin one.

uh, that's weird: the link doesn't lead to the review i've read. Apparently Thom wrote an expanded version that I read through the AMG newsletter. That was more positive. No matter what Thom thinks of it here and now, I'll be curious to hear how good it is.

EDIT: sorry, it's actually the same review, except the link leads to the first lines or the entire review, for whatever reason.

Edited by Hugues

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I'm pretty sure I've driven my co-workers nuts today playing the two Lana Del Rey tracks you can hear on her website here.

The single is out Oct. 16. I'm curious to hear more from her.

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Guest Thom Jurek   
Guest Thom Jurek

David Murray Cuban Ensemble - Plays Nat King Cole En Espanol

Jean-Claude Vannier - Red Rouge Sang AND Electro Rapide A dynamite all new album and a separate killer rarities collection by the masterful composer and arranger who gave us not only L'enfant Assassin des Mouches but also collaborated with Serge Gainsbourg on Histoire DU Melodie Nelson, and the soundtracks top L'Horse, and Canabis. (sic).

Leyland Kirby- Eager To Tear Apart The Stars

Ordo Obsidium - Orbis Tertius

Wolves In The Throne Room - Celestial Lineage

James Carter Organ Trio - At The Crossroads (the history---past, present AND future--of Detroit Jazz is represented on this excellent date).

Claudio Quintet +1 What Is The Beautiful (Featuring Kurt Elling and Theo Bleckman)

Raoul Bjornkenheim, Bill Laswell, Morgan Agren - Blixt

Moholy-Nagy - Like Mirage (Three members of Tarentel go solo)

Taylor Ho Bynum Sextet- Apparent Distance

Johnny Lytle - Done It Again (Get On Down reissues excellent 1967 Liberty/ Blue Note album)

Connie Smith -- Long Line Of Heartches

Hannah Miller- O Black River EP

Heikki Sarmanto Big Band - Everything Is It

Mark McGuire - Get Lost

Waterboys - An Appointment With Mr. Yeats

Charalambides - Exile

Fennez - Seven Stars

Edited by Thom Jurek

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opus   

Teen Daze - A Silent Planet

Teen Daze's spaced out ode to C.S. Lewis' Out of the Silent Planet. Musically, it falls somewhere in between Washed Out, Boards of Canada, and M83. My only real complaint is that the vocals are well-nigh indecipherable, and I'm really curious as to how Lewis' sci-fi prose manifested itself in the songs.

Listen

Language of Landscape - The Immensity Of Unstained Light

I really liked Language of Landscape's previous work, and this piece -- a twenty minute improvisation performed live in one of the band member's living room -- doesn't disappoint. It's sad and elegiac, but also serene and beautiful. Highly recommended if you're into Stars of the Lid, The Dead Texan, and similar drone artists.

Listen

Glacis - Lost Again On Waking

Minimal, melancholy piano pieces accompanied by glitch, field recordings, and other bits and pieces of processing. It's nothing groundbreaking, but it's executed really well, and I find it very affecting.

Listen

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Guest Thom Jurek   
Guest Thom Jurek

Les Rallizes Denudes - Double Heads [box of six CDs taken from gigs in 1980 and 81) Limited to 1000 copies.

Bert Jansch - Angie: The Collection--fine budget priced , 24 track intro form Universal UK that actually sounds good. If you are looking for a way in to this BRILLIANT musician who we just lost last week, this is a good place to start (bt then, so is Sweet Child by Pentangle).

Kieran Hebden (of Fourtet), Steve Reid, and Mats Gustafson - Live At The West Bank (recorded in 2009, shortly before Reid passed away). Killer double CD of vanguard jazz and electronics that is still quite accessible due to Reid's circular rhythm approach to drumming.

Piers Faccini- My Wilderness

Library Voices - Summer Of Lust

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Guest Thom Jurek   
Guest Thom Jurek

Piers Faccini- My Wilderness

New Piers Faccini?! How did I miss this?

It was released yesterday, and is the finest thing he's released yet. I haven't gotten around to getting the review quite finished, but I will within the next few days.

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Piers Faccini- My Wilderness

New Piers Faccini?! How did I miss this?

It was released yesterday, and is the finest thing he's released yet. I haven't gotten around to getting the review quite finished, but I will within the next few days.

Good to hear! Out of curiosity, what did you consider his finest release before this? I'm a big fan of Tearing Sky.

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Guest Thom Jurek   
Guest Thom Jurek

Good to hear! Out of curiosity, what did you consider his finest release before this? I'm a big fan of Tearing Sky.

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Guest Thom Jurek   
Guest Thom Jurek

I have no idea how I forgot this but

70s Jazz reissue of the year perhaps is out now on CD:

Julius Hemphill - Dogon AD

This set, now legendary, was issued first as a single LP on Hemphill's Mbari imprint in 1972, and later on Arista Freedom in 1977. It featured the best of Saint Louis in a wild underground vanguard jazz whirlwind of a set that was all based on blues. The players: altoists Tim Berne David Sanborn and Hemphill (founding member of the World Saxophone Quartet) on alto and flute, trumpeter Baikida Carroll, cellist Abdul Wadud, and drummer Philip Wilson. This was really and truly one of the most influential records to come out of Saint Louis after its 1950s hard bop explosion. The best news is that this reissue contains the COMPLETE session, which includes The Hard Blues, left off the original due to the limitations of the LP format and Hemphill's lack of funds at the tiome. This is a true out jazz classic.

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