Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BBBCanada

Cornerstone 2006

Recommended Posts

I got back from Cornerstone today, had a wonderful time. I enjoyed getting the chance to once again meet Mike and Doug and Ann and to see many fine films. What a great lineup, three Dardennes films, some Rosselini films, and I had a chance to see a film called Lamerica from a director I hadn't heard of before, Gianni Amelio. I was very impressed. They also showed some really cool short films as well. One in particular that stood out was called Trailer Park Unicorn. It was a lot better than the title would indicate, a definite Tim Burton/Mirrormask kind of vibe.

I also had a blast watching Donnie Darko with those crazy folks in the Imaginarium, as well as being priviledged to participate in the first official Imaginarium Bad Movie Night where we got to watch a movie about mutated killer rabbits called Night of the Lepus. I'm sure Snakes on a Plane will be kid stuff after that one. :D

I tried to avoid the emo and screamo, but caught a few good concerts as well from the 77s, Lost Dogs, Over the Rhine, and Mute Math, among others.

Many Kudos for Mike and Doug and everyone who helped put together the Flickerings and Imaginarium programs. And it can't be a coincidence that Flickerings featured a Rossellini retrospective and Italy won the World Cup today. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There were protestors? They must have given up by the time I got there. I arrived Thursday morning at 10:30 and promptly went to Flickerings because I didn't want to miss Sophie's Scholl (excellent movie, btw). I wasn't sure where you'd be, Brandon, since I knew your son wanted to visit some bands. I figured I'd never find you in that huge crowd based off of just a picture, so I didn't really try.

Doug said he was pretty much there the whole time. I just went up to people and asked "are you from Arts and Faith? no? okay next person". :D Of course it helped that Friday Mike H had an Arts and Faith t-shirt on. I missed Thom(asher) as well, which stunk because he works with some of my co-workers. Would have loved to meet him.

I loved the archaeology seminars. The speaker was fantastic. I'm a huge history/archaeology/anthropology person and it was right up my alley. The Canticle for Leibowitz discussions were interesting too, but my favorite parts were the discussions after the films.

Ah, but my favorite moment had to be when Mike, Doug, Crow and I were sitting at the coffee "house", and I mention the Cardinals having a bad season, and Mike saying "aww" very sarcastically. Then I remembered he said he was from Chicago, so I told him to shut up. Long live the Cards/Cubs rivalry! ;)

Seriously, that was my favorite moment of the entire trip, was sitting there and talking movies with you guys. It was all awesome.

Btw, Brandon, what did your son think of the festival? He's been posting on the board, now, right?

Edited by Ann D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, as some of you other A&F people are going to be there next year? Any time we have a discussion about us all getting together, maybe Cornerstone will have to be THAT meeting place. It seems pretty centrally located. And with Flickerings and the Imaginarium there, what better place to meet?

As for the protesters, I actually did not see them, but I think my son did and talk had gotten around. Anyhoo...what were they protesting? I'm not sure to tell you the truth. I mean, look at the people Cornerstone draws. Everyone basically had, earings in every part of their body and nappy hair and dressed emo...soooo...I think that had something to do with it. Plus, Cornerstone is a part of JPUSA and JPUSA was birthed out of the hippie movement. There still very much that "60's flower power" gang that is still in the ranks--without the drugs. Plus what Alan said. Wendi Kaiser pretty much said the same thing. That many people? I'm sure there is bound to be some dishonorable behavior there.

Ann asked about my son Brandon liking Cornerstone. There was one or two things that he went to by himself or with me that he didn't care for i.e. Wendi Kaiser's talk on sexuality. I was surprised on that myself. He said it is because he is more concerned about suicide issues and that sexuality is not an issue for him. He says his youth pastor speaks very well on that topic. Still, I set it before him (as I do every so often) and I prayed with him for God to protect him from sexual sin. Man that's just scary stuff. He REALLY liked the concerts and got to see his two favorite bands--"As I Lay Dying" and "UnderOath." I asked him if he had a good time and would like to go again next year and he acknowledged MOST POSTIVELY that he would like to.

Myself, I couldn't help but feeling like I was ins some time warp. Say back in the 60's. But I was definitely refreshed by the Holy Spirit. I think I really needed to be there. I'll have some pics up soon. By the way, did any of you see P.O.D.? They played Saturday. I missed them. That's who I really wanted to see.

Edited by BBBCanada

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suggestion...there may have been some there and I just missed them, but next year have some Flickerings T-shirts that are Triple X large. I don't know if it's my body shape or what, but the Double X is still too tight. Not a complaint, just a suggestion. ;)

Brandon, I didn't see POD, but I could sure hear them. My camp wasn't really "close" to the main stage--that is, it would have been quite a walk--but it was closer than a lot of the grounds, so I could hear them. It sounded like they rocked the place pretty good!

I did notice that it was very white. Again, not a complaint, and there was some diversity, but it did seem overwhelmingly Caucasion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't see the protestors either, but I'm not surprised. There are some uptight Christians who feel they have to always be protesting something, and anyone who is different than them makes a convenient target.

I found Cornerstone to be a refreshing experience, as I always do. I think the Holy Spirit is there, and there's something about being around so many creative people that I find refreshing as well.

I walked down to Main Stage and caught a few songs by P.O.D. I heard them do a straight-up reggae song that was really cool. I recognized a couple of their "hits", but didn't recognize anything else they did. But they sounded tight and rocked the house.

I agree that Cornerstone is overwhelmingly white, but that's unavoidable, given that the festival takes place far from any urban area. I don't know how diverse other Christian festivals are, but I think the logistics of finding a place to have such a large gathering ensures that you would have to choose a rural area. I did go to a Christian rock festival in Memphis in 2001 called the One Festival, which was put on by someone who used to work for Cornerstone. Memphis is unique in that it has a large park in the middle of the city that has the right geograhic layout for a rock festival. The One Festival had the same kind of bands that Cornerstone did, but they made a conscious effort to reach out to African Americans by scheduling black gospel singers and groups for the main stage one night. They did draw a racially diverse crowd for that night, but it was a fairly small one. They didn't draw enough people for the entire festival to justify holding it again, which was a shame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I didn't see the protestors either, but I'm not surprised. There are some uptight Christians who feel they have to always be protesting something, and anyone who is different than them makes a convenient target.

Yeah, you can go to the CS website blog and see that they were in fact there.

I found Cornerstone to be a refreshing experience, as I always do. I think the Holy Spirit is there, and there's something about being around so many creative people that I find refreshing as well.

Yeah, what I found to be refreshing was the fact that most of these creative people were turned on to Jesus and just wanted to do their thing. People brought their own instruments and played right there

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I recall, e-pals of mine said the protestors singled out the screening of Val Lewton's The Body Snatcher as an example of the sort of evil that was going on at Cstone.

BTW, what's with the archaeology seminars? Who spoke? What about? What was the angle? Hopefully it wasn't as fundie as those anti-evolution seminars Phillip Johnson gave when I was there. (Nope, I haven't forgotten those.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love your points about race and demographics, Alan, but then, I've been ranting for some time about the way movies that cater to an African-American audience are always described as "urban" in the news reports. Language evolves, but some evolutions are less-better than others.

(But hey! Let's not forget that "pagan" and "heathen" originally meant "country-dweller" -- back in the days when Gentile Christianity was a primarily urban phenomenon, that's where all the non-Christians tended to be!)

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JPUSA is in the inner city, folks -- plus I would never put myself in the position of second guessing them on racial / diversity issues.

Not questioning them on racial/diversity but on why Cornerstone 2006 is predominantly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not questioning them on racial/diversity but on why Cornerstone 2006 is predominantly

Edited by Doug C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Exactly. This is about the music being programmed and who it predominantly appeals to (white Christian teenagers), not JPSUA itself. The festival also skews young, except for the many old timers and parents who attend with their kids. One volunteer told me it was JPUSA's conviction that twentysomething attendance has slacked off over the years because "college kids don't listen to Christian music anymore," and I don't doubt that's largely true. This seems to be about transgressive sounding music that is tolerated by Christian parents because certain lyrics or labels sanction it.

My buddy and I were discussing this. He doesn't have a problem with CS being this way as outreach. Most outreach is very limited like that. My thinking was that if they were going to do outreach then it SHOULD be diverse. But he said that to be diverse was to basically take away what CS is all about--reaching white Christian teenagers, who what? Listen to emo/screamo stuff. What say ye?

I must say, Flickerings was our best year in terms of thematic coherence, attendance, and depth of conversation. Germany Year Zero and L'Enfant were probably our two best discussions, both of which lasted at least half and hour and each included a couple dozen people at the mic. It was amazing to see teenagers fully plugged into L'Enfant, comparing the characters to people they knew and their own stories, and making profound connections with the subtle redemptive themes of the film. I learned a lot.

See...I missed it. Wow. I'm bummed. I'm such a dope. ;)

As to religious patriotism, I didn't seen any of it (and I must've recieved at least a dozen random attaboys for my Stop Wars t-shirt), so if it was there it must've been pretty subdued. There were also several pro-peace and progressive seminars regarding current events in the Middle East. Our screening of Winter Soldier--and Mike's excellent moderation--met a very receptive audience even though we expected it to be controversial.

Yeah...neither did I. "Stop Wars" (heh, heh, heh...). As a matter of fact, I'd say that most of the people there were probably anti-institutional if anything (for reasons they themselves may not be sure of). By the way, I wore a black t-shirt that said, "Detroit" on it? Anyone see me? :)

It was really great to see Crow again and to meet Ann, who was so friendly and insightful. (I'm really grateful you joined us in the barn despite your allergies!) BBBCanada, we've been talking about Flickerings for a couple months now, and my seminar was listed on the website and the C-stone program, so I'm really surprised you didn't know I was there. I was looking forward to meeting you! It sounds like you stepped in during the Grip Truck 101 seminar on Wednesday.

I looked through that schedule and didn't see your name. When there is too much information? I overload and lose my bearings. I don't remember if you were doing something at the same time as C. Stephen Evans and that's who I REALLY wanted to hear speak.

As I recall, I did walk into the Grip 101. It was 101 something. Of course, I kinda like the technical aspects of film making myself. Pretty fascinating stuff.

And yes, it was nice to have fundamentalists picketing the festival outside the grounds--if their only audience wasn't the random cows and tractors that would occasionally pass by on the road, I would've considered it great publicity. Apparently, some JPUSA women took them some them water in the middle of the day, but were turned down.

They probably thought it was unholy water and that dishonored God. <_<

I'm going to try and have some pics up on Flickr within the next couple of days--as is--unedited. Next year, I hope to capture pics of "the people" that make up Cornerstone. Just randomly take pics of people. I just bought a Canon PowerShot A700 and was experimenting with it this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops, I need to make a correction. It was MLeary, not Jeffrey Overstreet, who said they'd definitely be there next year. Sorry Jeffrey! Didn't mean to put words in your mouth. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the Protestor blog:

"Below is a summary of our covert mission trip to witness at Cornerstone Festival 2006, owned by the

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How distressing to learn that flamboyance may have been committed at Cstone Fest! We'll have to look into that... ;) Meanwhile, the Imaginararium Post-Fest Report is up, with a Flickerings Report coming maybe by next week (the latter may include a photo of Doug Cummings lighting the Official Flickerings Flame with the Secret Elixer). Both programs went really well this year, maybe the best ever. It was a blast hanging out with Doug and Crow and Ann D., talking about movies over an Elephant Ear (and weeping over the woes of the St. Louis Cardinals). Some of my Flickerings highlights over the last few years have been the conversations with A & F folk in that crowded little coffee tent. I look forward to more in the future!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What specifically was disrespectful?

Edited by BBBCanada

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan, I didn't go to any of the Gender Revolution seminars, so I may be talking out my rear, but it seemed to me there was a decent balance between the two viewpoints--that is, feminism versus...whatever the male equivalent is called. I hesitate to call it outright chauvenism.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mike...thanks for the link. Very nice. Beautiful. I'll be sure to make it to both Flickerings and the Imaginararium next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I stated, I'm probably not the one to say. Maybe Mike, or someone more closely associated with the seminars.

I say it because of the seminar titles; several of which had to do with rape, oppression of Indian women, and such. There were several I would have been interested in attending but didn't have the time.

I also don't know what you mean by "divisive". I didn't see a banner (was that part of the protestors?). And as for women's roles in spirituality and government, I'll have to leave that for another thread.

What exactly is CBE?

I just felt that, for a festival, the two sides "appeared" to be represented. Obviously, I don't know for sure.

FWIW.

Going back to race issue for just a sec. Why is there a distinction between "white" teen demographic and "black" teen demographic? Why the difference based only on color, which is the sense I get from Cornerstone's marketing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the things I most appreciate about Cornerstone is its acceptance--even celebration--of cultural and theological diversity, which is a rare and beautiful thing to experience in community given its scarcity in our institutions like individual churches. You can't program diversity, it has to emerge chaotically, and yet that is how I see the Kingdom. It's also one of the creative sparks that sustains this board--you don't have to agree with everything in it to participate. I would hate to miss out on Flickerings because I was offended by something I heard (or heard described) that was presented in, say, the "Martial Arts and Missions" seminar. Fortunately, God is the only omnipresent being allowed in all tents at all times; us mortals have to choose which ones we will engage and fellowship within.

Mike, thanks for taking the time to write up that wonderful summary. Your thoughts and enthusiasm are just as infectious and inspiring in print as they are in person! Your comments remind me how happy and well-adjusted James and Gwendolyn Leggett were. I so enjoyed listening to Gwendolyn rave about Fritz Lang's The Tiger of Eschnapur and beg her father to contact a friend of the family this summer who has a rare 16mm print of While the City Sleeps. It did my heart glad to see teenagers treated like intelligent, responsible people for a change, instead of theological/cultural automatons. I wish I had kids to take to Cornerstone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should also add the caveat that this is my first Cornerstone, and I know it's been going on for years, so if there has been more diversity in the past then feel free to tell me to shut up.

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ann, Cornerstone is much more intellectually and aesthetically diverse than most Christian events, but it still has a lot of room to grow, particularly in the areas you've cited (age and race). My impression is that it's still largely an event aimed at white, middle class Christian teenagers. (At least they're the vast bulk of the 30,000.) I'm wondering if Cornerstone would ever consciously begin moving away from the "emo and screamo" bands and incorporate other genres appealing to other demographics? Particularly as Christian consumer trends evolve/fade away?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Giving such a divisive issue such (partisan) prominence is wrong. It's one thing to be aesthetically provocative (as with the "Day of the Dead" stuff). It's another thing entirely to shove a divisive issue like that in people's faces. A better approach would be to encourage dialogue on gender roles and create a tent for that purpose.

So, how would

Edited by BBBCanada

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike, I loved the Imaginarium report. Thanks for writing that up. There's so much fascinating stuff there. I really enjoyed the Donnie Darko screening and discussion, and the Canticle for Leibowitz seminar. However, I think next year you need to discuss technology that allows people to be at two places at once so we can do Flickerings and the Imaginarium at the same time. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug C wrote:

: One of the things I most appreciate about Cornerstone is its acceptance--even celebration--of

: cultural and theological diversity, which is a rare and beautiful thing to experience in

: community given its scarcity in our institutions like individual churches.

I dunno, if you want diversity, maybe Greenbelt would be more your ticket? True, Greenbelt seemed more "liberal" than "balanced" when I was there 12 years ago, but it was still possible to find just about every point of view there.

I know mike_h doesn't like me bringing this up, but the prominence given to anti-evolutionists like Philip Johnson at Cornerstone has always nagged at me (that was six years ago, I think), and I had qualms about the prominence given to CBE when they sponsored the Flickerings screening of Whale Rider two years ago. Nothing major, but still there. (FWIW, I was very loosely affiliated with CBE a while ago myself, and might very well still be, if I wasn't Orthodox; but I still keep in touch with friends from that group.)

Crow wrote:

: However, I think next year you need to discuss technology that allows people to be at two places

: at once so we can do Flickerings and the Imaginarium at the same time. :)

Oooo, let's do time-travel! Back to the Future Part II! Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban! Primer!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...