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M. Leary

Art and the Resurrection - A New Direction In Christian Aesthetics?

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I was talking with a friend the other day about our disposable world. I was trying to find a tire for our lawn tractor that is almost 8 years old. It is falling apart and literally is held together with baling wire. I had a heck of a time finding a tire. Why do they continually redesign things, like changing the size of the tires? What possibly good does it do? Whatever happened to the idea of the interchangability of parts. Or building things to last for several generations. I wonder if this isn't an insidious, unexpected offshoot of the theory of evolution: that products have to always be changing and getting better-EVOLVING. So products are built only to last a short while, forcing us to buy the next, best model. Except we aren't really forced because we WANT to have the next and the better. This is a totaly insane way to live.

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Why do they continually redesign things, like changing the size of the tires? What possibly good does it do? Whatever happened to the idea of the interchangability of parts. Or building things to last for several generations. I wonder if this isn't an insidious, unexpected offshoot of the theory of evolution: that products have to always be changing and getting better-EVOLVING. So products are built only to last a short while, forcing us to buy the next, best model. Except we aren't really forced because we WANT to have the next and the better. This is a totaly insane way to live.

So that we constantly have to be buying new things! It keeps the economy going, right? Wouldn't the greatest economy on the earth look a little flat if we only had to buy a new appliance every 25 years (assuming they don't go back to such heinous colors as avacodo and gold). When we were shopping for that washer and dryer that is essentially what we were told by the salesmen: They make crappy products so you have to come back in 6 years and buy a new one.

And this in part seems to drive this *seemingly* infallible economy. Spend, spend, spend; whether we want to or not as you saw with your lawnmower wheel.

I talked about roofs this weekend with a friend. He and his wife hope to build on land they own after a 3 year mission support term in England, and he was talking about a book he'd read on slate roofs. These are generally considered very high-end, but they last hundreds of years! He hopes to design and build a house with this kind of staying power

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