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Albums that get no love


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Annelise wrote:

: I have never ever met anyone who has or likes Terry Scott Taylor's "Knowledge and

: Innocence," possibly the BEST album EVER recorded in the HIStory of planet Earth.

: Anyone who agrees with me on this can be my friend. Really.

Welcome, friend. I believe I have this one on LP, cassette AND CD. I think I might even still have the promotional thing that hangs from the ceiling -- it's like the record cover, except it's in a geometric shape, but not a cube, it's more like two triangles at the top and bottom with flat panels on the three sides.

I remember lending this album to someone at Bible school, and her returning it without finishing it. "Why not?" I asked. "There was snoring," she said. "But the song that comes after it is one of the best!" "There was snoring."

And I can't count the number of times I listened to 'Dancing on Light' in high school (I taped the song off of a local radio station long before I owned the album itself). And of course, 'One More Time' has always moved me to tears.

Oh, but I don't think K&I is necessarily Terry's best solo album. I have never listened to them back-to-back, but right now I'm partial to Avocado Faultline.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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And now I'm throwing down the gauntlet.

I have never ever met anyone who has or likes Terry Scott Taylor's "Knowledge and Innocence," possibly the BEST album EVER recorded in the HIStory of planet Earth.

Anyone who agrees with me on this can be my friend. Really.

YEAH! I was just thinking last week that I should dig this cassette out of the box! It's been ages since I listened to it but I nearly wore it out back in the day. It would be hard for me to crown it with best ever status when I'm so partial to his other solo album, John Wayne.

Edited by MichaelRay

"Did you mention, perhaps, what line of industrial lubricants Jesus would have endorsed?"

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Oh! Thought of two more good ones. Jeffrey will agree with me on these, I think, but he may be the only one.

For one, there's PJ Harvey's Is This Desire? While I love many of Polly Jean's albums-- Stories from the City... and To Bring You My Love are both excellent rock albums-- I've always loved the weird, dynamic, experimental rhythms and quirky character sketches of Desire the best. I think it's her finest album yet.

And I also dearly love U2's Pop-- perhaps the only album in their canon that really and truly gets no love. (Except maybe Rattle and Hum, which doesn't deserve it.)

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I really like Knowledge and Innocence as well. I didn't care for it much when it first came out, but I wasn't into synthesizer stuff in general back then. But the album grew on me over the years, and I think the synthesizers give the album a dreamy ethereal sound. "Dancing on Light" is a wonderful pop song, and "Out of the Wild Wood" would be a great soundtrack song for a fantasy film or novel.

Also, I agree on U2's Pop. I've always loved that album. That techno-rock sound has a momentum that floors me every time.

As far as other albums that get no love, I have to admit some affinity toward certain albums from the "Heavenly Metal" heydey. ::blushing::

Edited by Crow
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This is an interesting thread, but it bothers me that nearly every mention of an album that "gets no love" is then followed by another A&Fer seconding that particular mention.

Yeah, Jason opened this thread by referring to albums that "we" (presumably, A&Fers) love, but that others dismiss. Still, I was hoping for more mentions of albums that get no love from anybody but the person posting.

My Barry Goudreau mention fits. I stand by it. I think it's the only album mentioned in this thread that hasn't been affirmed by anyone else. WHERE'S THE LOVE, PEOPLE? That's OK. I don't need it! I've lasted this long, singing the album's praises all on my own. I'll fight on...

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Still, I was hoping for more mentions of albums that get no love from anybody but the person posting.

Well, what the flip is this then amigo? >

Saxon, Wheels of Steel--
I havent seen a single band or album on this thread more universally reviled than this one. To add insult to injury I'll also throw in Saxon's Denim and Leather and Power and the Glory. How 'bout them apples?

"The things we enjoy are channels through which the divine glory strikes us, and those who love and delight in any good thing may yet learn to love God." --Gilbert Meilaender

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Saxon, Wheels of Steel

Wheels of Steel? That was the best Rolling Stones album of their later period! So I share the love for this one, thus disqualifying ... errr ... wait a minute.

I think I see your point.

Also, I note that the thread title "Albums that get no love" has a sub-title, "(except from you)," which explains my confusion, I think.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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:( *sniff* OK

Princess of the Night!

"The things we enjoy are channels through which the divine glory strikes us, and those who love and delight in any good thing may yet learn to love God." --Gilbert Meilaender

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Yeah, Jason opened this thread by referring to albums that "we" (presumably, A&Fers) love, but that others dismiss. Still, I was hoping for more mentions of albums that get no love from anybody but the person posting.

No one mentioned their love for my initial albums, which leads me to believe that I am the only person on the planet that faints over Exit the Dragon.

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any fans of The Untouchables? how 'bout The English Beat? anything by any either of those bands. i'm always surprised by how many people, who love music, haven't heard of The Untouchables.

The Untouchables WILD CHILD, one of my favorite records of all time [do greatest hits albums count]

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Also, I note that the thread title "Albums that get no love" has a sub-title, "(except from you)," which explains my confusion, I think.

Ah, I think this is the nature of the topic! We were asked for albums that get no love (except from you), but that you think deserve love. Thus, once someone opens up and says, "Disregard me if you like, but this album is quite good", chances are that there is some overlooked merit to this album, that is is deserving, and unless you have listed some rediculously obscure album, someone else will have heard it's merit as well, and then they will pipe in (with a profusion of joy) with their mutual pleasure...yada yada yada...and suddenly (!) your album is taken off the list of appropriate albums for this thread. It is a self-defeating topic.

This is the topic for the lone-appreciators who listen in the dark recesses of their room to turn on the light and find a room full (or at least a hand full) of company. You have now been reassured that you are not singularly crazy. The only problem in finding your room full of fellow-admirerers is that you have to share your admiration with someone; you loose your status of the lone person who really understood the album. You (and by "you" I mean "I") possibly even liked being solely and (maybe even?) self-righteously a true follower of that album...ah, well. C'est la vie, n'est pas?

And I end my meandering post...

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Linkin Park, Meteora

Subtlety is underrated
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Linkin Park, Meteora

I don't know...I know alot of sweaty high school boys that really dig this album. But don't even get me started by what they consider good music. :P

"It is scandalous for Christians to have an imagination starved for God." - Mark Filiatreau

I write occasionally at Unfamiliar Stars.

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Linkin Park, Meteora

I know alot of sweaty high school boys that really dig this album. But don't even get me started by what they consider good music. :P

Well, yeah. That's kind of why I put it there. I love this album. There is raw emotion in a lot of the songs, and an overall theme of frustration, desperation, and feelings of being disrespected. I don't know about Linkin Park's other albums, but I hear things in this album that make me...well, relate.

Subtlety is underrated
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Annelise:

I have never ever met anyone who has or likes Terry Scott Taylor's "Knowledge and Innocence," possibly the BEST album EVER recorded in the HIStory of planet Earth.

Oh man! I haven't listened to this one in ages. I've got a copy back in PA. I don't think it's the best album ever, but I do think it's the best solo album he's done and better than many DA, SE, LD records...

Is that close enough to be friend material? ::blush::

Okay, maybe I was exaggerating a wee bit. Yes, Darryl A. Armstrong, you are my friend.

Where is the Life we have lost in living? Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?

--T.S. Eliot--
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Just one more word on K & I. I do so appreciate hearing from others who appreciate this album. I too first owned it on vinyl, then cassette and now CD.

I think I love it so much is because of its etherealness, yeah, but also because at the time I first heard Taylor I was an evangelical Christian in a certain kind of church who hung out with certain type of people, read only certain kind of books and listened to certain kinds of music. Taylor's music made me explore the poetry of Wm. Blake, which awakened my religiously complacent spirit. It was a turning point in my life.

So, I guess we all have a certain book, movie, poem, piece of music or something that touched us so deeply we were never the same afterwards.

Maybe that's seed for a new thread?

Where is the Life we have lost in living? Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?

--T.S. Eliot--
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By the way, Josh, yes... I *do* agree that Is This Desire? is PJ Harvey's best album. And that Pop is fantastic.

I just realized, seeing that they're playing here in Seattle this week, that one of my favorite bands came and went without ever receiving the love in America that they deserved.

Actually, it's really a "he."

Karl Wallinger.... otherwise known as World Party.

Private Revolution was a great debut, but Goodbye Jumbo is a landmark album for me... pure pop bliss. The opener, "Is It Too Late?" is one of my favorite recordings ever...

The follow-up, Bang!, rocked even harder, and felt like a bigger, badder sequel.

Then there was a long absence, which ended with an album that barely even registered in the music world, but I found it to be a satisfying return: Egyptology, which introduced the world to the song "She's the One," which Robbie Williams turned into a smash hit by copying the original note for note.

And for some reason, I still haven't heard Dumbing Up. I heard a few tracks on Napster back in 2000, and they didn't grab me. I just noticed that the album was released in the U.S. THIS YEAR... six years after its original release. Weird.

Anyway, I love this guy, and I wonder if anyone else here shares the love.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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I just realized, seeing that they're playing here in Seattle this week, that one of my favorite bands came and went without ever receiving the love in America that they deserved.

Actually, it's really a "he."

Karl Wallinger.... otherwise known as World Party.

(snip)

Anyway, I love this guy, and I wonder if anyone else here shares the love.

Oh yeah. Karl Wallinger is a genius of a pop songwriter.

And let me put in a plug for Wallinger's former group The Waterboys as well. Although the focus there tended to be on Mike Scott (and for good reason; he's a great songwriter in his own right), Wallinger contributed significantly to A Pagan Place and This is the Sea. Wallinger had already left to form World Party before the release of The Waterboys' best known (and probably best) album Fisherman's Blues, but I missed Wallinger's yang to Scott's yin. So I'd add The Waterboys to the underappreciated list as well. They should have been huge, but they never emerged beyond cult favorite status.

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I loved the Waterboys all the way up until Dream Harder, and then they began to sound like a commercial American version of the Waterboys... not a good thing. I prefer Mike Scott's solo albums to recent Waterboys albums... especially "Bring 'Em All In."

But yes, Fisherman's Blues is their best album, even if This is the Sea is more important to me for the nostalgia factor. That album was almost as important to my college years as Achtung Baby, Out of Time, Automatic for the People, and Martinis and Bikinis. I'm also a big fan of their Room to Roam record, which got a bad rap.

Yes, they should have been huge, and watching Mike Scott's career choices, it was obvious to me that he thoguht so too.

He and Wallinger were just too big to stay in the same band. Two geniuses in one band rarely ever works.

They put on great live shows, though, together and separately. I'm really tempted to go see Wallinger this week. His last few Seattle shows, many years ago now, were all brilliant.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Jeffrey Overstreet wrote:

: I loved the Waterboys all the way up until Dream Harder, and then they began to sound like a

: commercial American version of the Waterboys... not a good thing. I prefer Mike Scott's solo

: albums to recent Waterboys albums... especially "Bring 'Em All In."

As I recall, Dream Harder pretty much WAS a Mike Scott solo album -- I don't think it had any of the other musicians that other "Waterboys" albums had, and the photo in the liner notes is simply a photo of Scott himself, and not of "the band". And it was right after that that Scott went solo OFFICIALLY. (I forget, is Rock in the Weary Land or whatever that album's called a "Waterboys" album or a "Mike Scott" album? Heck, for all I know, it might be a "Mike Scott and The Waterboys" album.)

Bring 'Em All in has some pretty good tunes, but I don't think anything tops 'Love Anyway' on, um, whatever the album AFTER that was called. (Gadzooks, what's with my memory today.)

FWIW, if the number of times I've played an album is any indication, I may be a bigger fan of Room to Roam than of either Fisherman's Blues or This Is the Sea. I may even like Dream Harder more than those two -- at least for 'The Return of Pan' (the first Waterboys song I ever heard) and 'Corn Circles' and a couple others. And I LOVE the live concert version of 'Savage Earth Heart' on The Secret Life of the Waterboys, a collection of singles and B-sides and whatnot; that one gets into my blood every time I hear it.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Annelise wrote:

: I have never ever met anyone who has or likes Terry Scott Taylor's "Knowledge and

: Innocence," possibly the BEST album EVER recorded in the HIStory of planet Earth.

: Anyone who agrees with me on this can be my friend. Really.

Welcome, friend. I believe I have this one on LP, cassette AND CD.

It's scary how many things you and I have in common, isn't it?

I think I might even still have the promotional thing that hangs from the ceiling -- it's like the record cover, except it's in a geometric shape, but not a cube, it's more like two triangles at the top and bottom with flat panels on the three sides.

Well, OK, don't think I ever had one of those. I did have promotional hanger-type stuff for some other CCM records, though...

I haven't actually dug it out and listened to it since my son was born, although I've sung him my own version of "A Song of Innocence" once or twice. it was always a meaningful album, but moreso now that I have a kid. Same goes for you, I would imagine.

And of course, 'One More Time' has always moved me to tears.

I would sing this at a funeral if anyone asked me, but it'd have to be the funeral of someone I didn't know or care about in the least. Otherwise I'd collapse on the first chorus.

Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

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  • 4 weeks later...

This is an interesting thread, but it bothers me that nearly every mention of an album that "gets no love" is then followed by another A&Fer seconding that particular mention.

Ok, I'll bite. I have an overabundant fondness for Barry McGuire's Have You Heard. While Cosmic Cowboy and Bullfrogs and Butterflies can be kicked to the curb, Have You Heard is a fine album. Even with the "chubby chubby" song.

Jesus is not a zombie...I shouldn't have to tell you that.

--Agent Booth, Bones

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  • 2 weeks later...

Anyone remember Believable Picnic? I'll add their debut to the list.

"The things we enjoy are channels through which the divine glory strikes us, and those who love and delight in any good thing may yet learn to love God." --Gilbert Meilaender

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Moby Grape -- Moby Grape

Blue Cheer -- New! Improved! Blue Cheer

Chamaeleon Church -- Chamaeleon Church

Utimate Spinach -- Ultimate Spinach (Listen to Ballad of the Hip Death Goddess! Everyone needs to own this album.)

Strawberry Alarm Clock -- Incense & Peppermints (the whole album, including Strawberries Mean Love, Rainy Day Mushroom Pillow, and Sit With the Guru!)

Dukes of Hamburg -- Some Folks

Various Artists -- Love, Peace, & Poetry / Turkish Psychedelic Music

(Does anyone know these albums? Am I here all alone in Psychedelic-land?)

Yours truly,

ABP

No one with a good car needs to be justified. -- Hazel Motes

In the final end, he won the wars, after losin' every battle.-- Bob Dylan, Idiot Wind

Hot Rod Anglican blog ...

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