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The Road


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#101 Christian

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 12:13 AM

So did this film get shut out of Oscar nominations? That's disappointing. I didn't think it would win, but it deserved a few nominations.

#102 Tyler

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 08:07 PM

Half an hour in. The unnecessary narration is bugging me, but at least it's not as bad as Little Children's.

When does Bilbo show up and sing his song?

#103 Tyler

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 10:14 PM


I haven't seen the film yet, but when I read the book,

Spoiler


I take the movie is far less ambiguous?


I hear there are dream sequences in the book but there are none in the film that I can recall. I suppose The Man's flashbacks to his wife (Theron) could be dreams since the film cuts to him waking up.


The way I interpreted it, all of the flashbacks in the movie were dream sequences (although dreams of things that really happened, if that makes sense). They end up becoming a barometer for the Father's health as the story progresses.

I wondered about whether the final scene was a dream/hallucination, especially since there's more fog there than during the other coast scenes, but I don't think that was Hillcoat's intention. I think he
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#104 Persona

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 06:36 PM

Holy smokes, has there ever been a more miserable film? I mean, like really. Enough is enough. I'm just glad Viggo's kid is a boy and not a little girl. My word! This is a miserable mess. Not that the film itself is a mess, just the world presented in the film! I never want to go there for Spring Break.

(1/2 way thru, we'll see if I can make it -- it's like Disintegration times a billion with no fun creepy spiders in the eyeballs)

#105 Persona

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 08:39 PM

I just finished this, so -- do I get in the hot bathwater and slash both wrists now or will the feeling eventually wear off.

#106 Christian

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 08:55 PM

The ending didn't make you want to hold off on the wrist-slashing, at least for a few minutes?

#107 Persona

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 09:08 PM


I got an odd invite of that sort as well. Not one for pastors and the like, but the publicist was keen on working the "people of faith will like this film, so please come to the screening" angle. Is there really that much religious content in the film?


Just a couple of discussions about what God's role might have been in the apocalyptic occurrence and aftermath, and a reference to the child as "the Word of God" and a man wondering how he would have made the world if he had been God. That's all that comes to mind.

And at one point they slept in a church underneath a giant window-like cross.

I ask because human beings are, after all, a form of animal, and it seems that the story needs to eliminate all non-human animals from the planet in order to get its cannibalism theme going. But such a premise strikes me as somewhat implausible, somewhat fairy-tale-ish -- it's kind of the opposite of that biological weapon the James Bond villain was going to use in Moonraker to wipe out all human beings while leaving the plants and animals intact -- and this may be one of those things that made it difficult for me to buy into the "reality" of the film.

That took me out of it, too. However, there was a beetle, a bird, and a dog.

Backrow Baptist wrote:
: The dialogue and performances are ambiguous enough but the score in that final scene is making it pretty clear that everything is going to be ok.

Yes, that is part of the construction that I referred to earlier.

But once you step back from the construction of that scene and look at the events within that scene in the context of the film as a whole, you have to come to the conclusion that this scene is, at best, a major narrative cheat.

*** SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS ***

Are we REALLY supposed to believe that, in a world where food is so unbelievably scarce and you definitely don't want to attract the attention of other people (who may or may not be cannibals), an entire family (not just a man, or a man and his child, but a three-person family unit) would take a dog with them everywhere? That they wouldn't have eaten it, and that they wouldn't have attracted unwanted attention every time the dog barked or something? (Question: What does the DOG eat?)

Yep. He's a goner. That dog likes white meat, not dark, and very young.

So did this film get shut out of Oscar nominations? That's disappointing. I didn't think it would win, but it deserved a few nominations.

Like what? Best Suicidal Tendencies film? Greatest hopeless drivel film?

Oh, I think I just got blood on the bath towels.

The ending didn't make you want to hold off on the wrist-slashing, at least for a few minutes?

I'm with Peter, this kid is minced meat.

Doesn't really matter anyway, I was kinda sick of him saying "Papa" all the time.

I never want to go there for Spring Break.

I just wanted to quote this because there are moments where I find myself hilarious.

Bring on the Kool-Aid!

Edited by Persona, 01 June 2010 - 09:10 PM.


#108 Tyler

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 09:16 PM

I just finished this, so -- do I get in the hot bathwater and slash both wrists now or will the feeling eventually wear off.


Kind of like how I felt after Antichrist, then.

And the more I think about it,
Spoiler

Edited by tyler1984, 01 June 2010 - 09:19 PM.


#109 Persona

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 09:19 PM


I just finished this, so -- do I get in the hot bathwater and slash both wrists now or will the feeling eventually wear off.


Kind of like how I felt after Antichrist, then.

Yeah, I guess The Road had so much rich symbolism in it that it really is better than Antichrist, so it makes up for a plot that puts a father/son on a road trip on volcano Earth for nearly two hours in which nothing happens and the most exciting thing is finding a can of peaches.

At the very least, Antichrist has Gainsbourg.

Edited by Persona, 01 June 2010 - 09:20 PM.


#110 MattPage

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 07:17 AM

If the family wanted to eat the kid they would have just killed him straight away. There's no need to wait, it's not like he can get away or anyone can stop him. Despite the false notes in that final scene, anything darker is implausible. The disadvantage of the dog is the same in either scenario.

Is it terrible if I admit that I preferred Book of Eli?

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#111 Persona

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 07:31 AM

Is it terrible if I admit that I preferred Book of Eli?

In an either/or world, probably not, as long as you wouldn't cross the street for either one.

#112 morgan1098

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 03:26 PM

If the family wanted to eat the kid they would have just killed him straight away. There's no need to wait, it's not like he can get away or anyone can stop him. Despite the false notes in that final scene, anything darker is implausible. The disadvantage of the dog is the same in either scenario.

Is it terrible if I admit that I preferred Book of Eli?

Matt


I just finished the book (saw the movie first), and I didn't get the impression from either the film OR the book that the kid was in any danger from the family at the end. It's possible that my reading of the book was influenced by the movie, but seriously, I didn't see anything ominous at all about the ending of the book. Maybe I'm just too optimistic.

#113 Christian

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 03:54 PM


If the family wanted to eat the kid they would have just killed him straight away. There's no need to wait, it's not like he can get away or anyone can stop him. Despite the false notes in that final scene, anything darker is implausible. The disadvantage of the dog is the same in either scenario.

Is it terrible if I admit that I preferred Book of Eli?

Matt


I just finished the book (saw the movie first), and I didn't get the impression from either the film OR the book that the kid was in any danger from the family at the end. It's possible that my reading of the book was influenced by the movie, but seriously, I didn't see anything ominous at all about the ending of the book. Maybe I'm just too optimistic.

On the contrary, people who see the ending as dark and ominous cannot bring themselves to see any hope in this book, especially as the end note of such a bleak, harrowing story. Sniffs of a sellout, although it's not -- but it's the one thing critics can't stand, either in literature or film.

#114 Ryan H.

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 03:59 PM

Sniffs of a sellout, although it's not -- but it's the one thing critics can't stand, either in literature or film.

This strikes me as being a pretty broad generalization, to the point of being almost unfair. Critics come in many different shapes and sizes.

Edited by Ryan H., 21 September 2010 - 04:02 PM.


#115 Christian

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 04:13 PM

Sniffs of a sellout, although it's not -- but it's the one thing critics can't stand, either in literature or film.

This strikes me as being a pretty broad generalization, to the point of being almost unfair. Critics come in many different shapes and sizes.

I broadly generalize sometimes.

#116 Peter T Chattaway

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 04:46 PM

I don't think the ending is "ominous". I just don't think it makes any sense in light of what we've already seen. It's a major, major cheat -- and it comes right at the point when it ought to be wrapping things up and giving the preceding storyline an extra layer of meaning.

#117 Tyler

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 06:07 PM

I don't think the ending is "ominous". I just don't think it makes any sense in light of what we've already seen. It's a major, major cheat -- and it comes right at the point when it ought to be wrapping things up and giving the preceding storyline an extra layer of meaning.


In other words, what the novel does.

#118 Anders

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 01:56 PM

Finally got around to watching this. I figured I should watch it BEFORE I become a father (which is likely to happen in the next week or so). Read the book a few years ago, and liked it a lot. I probably feel very similarly about this film as Ebert does. It's a good film. Well made for sure. Hillcoat captures some nice imagery. I especially enjoyed the sleeping in the semi-cab on the overpass. Viggo and the others give nice performances (Michael Kenneth Williams as the thief!).

I have to say though, that it doesn't add up to something more than the sum of its parts. I think I would have actually liked to see some of the shots play out longer. This film needs to feel more open and large. Sparser and bleaker if that's possible. And while I've listened to Nick Cave and Warren Ellis's score several times over the past couple of years on WHITE LUNAR, I don't like it as much in the context of the film.

But I think it's a fine film. I probably had unrealistic expectations of it. I'm glad that the film keeps the ambiguousness of the novel. There's a sense in which it is a litmus test for our willingness to believe in the survival of human goodness, even if it is a bit of a narrative cheat. I liked Victor's point in his review that the McCarthy, who many have accused of nihilism, basically reverses the Hobbesean proposition that man is inherently violent. There is no reason to expect the boy to behave the way he does unless you believe that people have an inherent moral compass.