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#21 Darrel Manson

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 10:33 PM

and hitting the x is only temporary - they keep coming back as suggestions.

#22 Jason Panella

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 10:21 AM

I'm still a Facebook novice, but am posting with a bit more frequency this week.

Today's discovery: Facebook "suggests" people I might want to be friends with -- people who have friends in common with me. But I don't really know these people. So I go to the "x" box to try to clear the suggestion. I click the "x" ... and the suggestion is immediately replaced with a suggestion of someone else I barely know, but who has friends in common with me.

Will the web never end? Is it possible to pull up my Facebook page without being prompted to make "friends" with someone else?


I've learned to tune those suggestions out. Who knows, though — you might find someone on there that you know and actually want to be friends with. I've discovered a few people that way.

#23 John Drew

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 01:41 PM

For those of you who play games through Facebook, a tale of terror...

FarmVille user runs up £900 debt

A mother has warned of the risk of children spending hundreds of pounds on "free" online games available through Facebook after her 12-year-old son ran up bills of more than £900 without her knowledge...

...She contacted her credit card company, HSBC, but was told she would only qualify for a refund if she reported her son to the police and obtained a crime number. "He would be cautioned and I have been told that this caution would stay with him. Obviously the idea of a stupid farm simulation jeopardising his future earnings is not something that I want to consider," she said.



#24 CherylR

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:16 PM

For those of you who play games through Facebook, a tale of terror...

FarmVille user runs up £900 debt

A mother has warned of the risk of children spending hundreds of pounds on "free" online games available through Facebook after her 12-year-old son ran up bills of more than £900 without her knowledge...

...She contacted her credit card company, HSBC, but was told she would only qualify for a refund if she reported her son to the police and obtained a crime number. "He would be cautioned and I have been told that this caution would stay with him. Obviously the idea of a stupid farm simulation jeopardising his future earnings is not something that I want to consider," she said.


Sounds to me like a kid who got hold of his mom's credit card, not a FB game issue. The games themselves are free--but they try to entice you to spend money on things to upgrade your farm/cafe/whatever. I've played/play the same game--it was a great stress reliever when my brain was shot from school--and I've done it without spending real money. (now that I've graduated, those same stress relievers are now just an annoyance.)

The game itself isn't the issue; I think it's more of a kid not seeing a problem using his mom's credit card w/out her knowledge. And if she did know, then she has no one to blame but herself.

#25 Peter T Chattaway

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 11:48 AM



#26 SDG

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 12:15 PM

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUyrMVkRTlI"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=eUyrMVkRTlI[/url]

So is this a Firefox-only issue? Or is it only in Firefox that there's a third-party extension patching the issue? What about platform -- are Windows and MacOS equally vulnerable?

#27 Peter T Chattaway

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 12:18 PM

SDG wrote:
: So is this a Firefox-only issue? Or is it only in Firefox that there's a third-party extension patching the issue?

The latter, I believe.

FWIW, I believe this video was created in response to the recent release of Firesheep, a Firefox extension that makes it really easy to see the other accounts on your network. But the problem would exist with or without Firesheep. (I don't know if it's quite the same thing, but note how Google recently revealed that it had collected lots of passwords and e-mails with its Google Street View cars.)

: What about platform -- are Windows and MacOS equally vulnerable?

No idea.

#28 Cunningham

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 07:00 AM

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUyrMVkRTlI"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=eUyrMVkRTlI[/url]

So is this a Firefox-only issue? Or is it only in Firefox that there's a third-party extension patching the issue? What about platform -- are Windows and MacOS equally vulnerable?

The OS X is just as vulnerable as Windows. It's not technically an OS vulnerability that Firesheep exploits as much as a vulnerability in the way most "secure" websites work. There's a really good writeup on the whole Firesheep fiasco here, which includes measures you can take to protect yourself (the easiest and least technical of which is not to access private sites on open networks).

#29 Overstreet

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 06:43 PM

If you use Facebook, you should read this. For your own safety.

#30 Peter T Chattaway

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 06:30 PM

Teens join Twitter to escape parents on Facebook: survey
Teens don't tweet, will never tweet – too public, too many older users. Not cool.
That's been the prediction for a while now, born of numbers showing that fewer than one in 10 teens were using Twitter early on.
But then their parents, grandparents, neighbours, parents' friends and anyone in-between started friending them on Facebook, the social networking site of choice for many — and a curious thing began to happen. . . .
The growing popularity teens report fits with findings from the Pew Internet & American Life Project, a non-profit organization that monitors people's tech-based habits. The migration has been slow, but steady. A Pew survey last July found that 16 per cent of young people, ages 12 to 17, said they used Twitter. Two years earlier, that percentage was just eight per cent. . . .
“The first group to colonize Twitter were people in the technology industry — consummate self-promoters,” says Alice Marwick, a post-doctoral researcher at Microsoft Research, who tracks young people's online habits.
For teens, self-promotion isn't usually the goal. At least until they go to college and start thinking about careers, social networking is, well, social.
But as Twitter has grown, so have the ways people, and communities, use it. . . .
Associated Press, January 30


Facebook Says It’s Losing Young Teens
The post-market rally in Facebook shares collapsed like a souffle after the company made the disclosure in a conference call with analysts. The stock price was up about 15% after it released strong Q3 earnings. But the price is now virtually flat after CFO David Ebersam said the company had seen a drop in use among young teens. “Our best analysis on youth engagement in the U.S. reveals that usage of Facebook among U.S. teens overall was stable from Q2 to Q3, but we did see a decrease in daily users, specially among younger teens.” Although he considers the data of “questionable statistical significance,” he added that he “wanted to share this with you now since we get a lot of questions about teens.” Indeed, early this month investment firm Piper Jaffray said in its “Taking Stock With Teens” survey that “the popularity of Facebook is waning among teens, with 23% citing it as the most important [social media platform], down from 33% six months ago and 42% a year ago.” That seemed to contradict CEO Mark Zuckerberg‘s comment to analysts in July that while “there has been a lot of speculation reporting that fewer teens are using Facebook,” company data showed that it “just isn’t true. … We believe that we’re close to fully penetrated in the U.S. teen demographic for a while and the number of teens using Facebook on both a daily and monthly basis has been steady over the past year and half.”
Deadline.com, October 30

#31 Tyler

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 04:02 PM

Facebook conducted an experiment to see if they can emotionally manipulate users. Turns out they can.

 

 

A face-to-face encounter with someone who is sad or cheerful can leave us feeling the same way. This emotional contagion has been shown to last anywhere from a few seconds to weeks.

 

A team of researchers, led by Adam Kramer at Facebook in Menlo Park, California, was curious to see if this phenomenon would occur online. To find out, they manipulated which posts showed up on the news feeds of more than 600,000 Facebook users. For one week, some users saw fewer posts with negative emotional words than usual, while others saw fewer posts with positive ones.

 

Digital emotions proved somewhat contagious, too. People were more likely to use positive words in Facebook posts if they had been exposed to fewer negative posts throughout the week, and vice versa. The effect was significant, though modest (PNAS, doi.org/tcg).