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Nutrition Advice (WAS Nutrition Advice From Weston Price)


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#1 Christian

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 02:29 PM

Rather than post in Coltrane's "My South Beach Diet" thread, where the low-carb / high-fat approach to dieting has been debated, I wanted to start a new thread after reading this article about Weston Price. I've come across Price's name and theories on the Atkins discussion board and in Gary Taubes' book, Good Calories, Bad Calories, and don't consider myself a full advocate. But as a pork-rind eater, weekly purchaser (if not drinker -- I leave that to my kids) of raw milk, and fan of Nina Planck's book Real Food (she's quoted in the article), I'm very intrigued:

Eating healthy on the road can be tricky for Sally Fallon. But if the founder of the Washington nutrition nonprofit group Weston A. Price Foundation ever gets desperate, she can always hit a gas station for a bag of pork cracklings: "It's often the only real thing to eat," she says.

Fallon's definition of "real" is vastly different from what many Americans who consider themselves health-conscious might describe. She advocates butter on bread "so thick you can see teeth marks in it," plenty of meat and unpasteurized, or raw, milk.

Those are foods recommended by Price, a Cleveland dentist who traveled the world studying primitive diets. His 1939 book, "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration," concluded that a diet high in the vitamins found in animal fats and untouched by "modern" innovations such as refined flour, sugar and chemically preserved foods was the key to preventing chronic disease and tooth decay.


We're borrowing the cookbook mentioned in the article this weekend. Turns out a friend, to whom I e-mailed the article link, has a copy.

Edited by Christian, 15 August 2008 - 02:31 PM.


#2 Greg P

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 09:06 AM

QUOTE
The foundation recommends spreading butter "so thick you can see teeth marks."
laugh.gif I like this already!!!

#3 Annelise

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 09:50 AM

QUOTE (Christian @ Aug 15 2008, 03:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We're borrowing the cookbook mentioned in the article this weekend. Turns out a friend, to whom I e-mailed the article link, has a copy.


So how is the cookbook? Tried any recipes yet? What's it all about, Christian?

#4 Christian

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 10:46 AM

QUOTE (Annelise @ Oct 1 2008, 10:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Christian @ Aug 15 2008, 03:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We're borrowing the cookbook mentioned in the article this weekend. Turns out a friend, to whom I e-mailed the article link, has a copy.


So how is the cookbook? Tried any recipes yet? What's it all about, Christian?


Our friend highly recommended the soup recipes, but my wife wasn't eager to explore the cookbook. She likes it in theory, but with a newborn and three other kids to feed, she wasn't up for tackling new recipes. So we handed it back to the friend who loaned it.

Before doing that, I did read all the introductory text, which goes into detail about Price's research and against-the-accepted-wisdom views on certain ingredients. It was bracing -- a refresher for me, but something I enjoy re-reading from time to time. Some laudatory reviews are here. Price's Wikipedia entry is here.

#5 Christian

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 08:54 PM

QUOTE (Christian @ Aug 15 2008, 02:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
But as a pork-rind eater, weekly purchaser (if not drinker -- I leave that to my kids) of raw milk, and fan of Nina Planck's book Real Food (she's quoted in the article), I'm very intrigued


Nina is speaking at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Fairfax tomorrow from 10-11:30 a.m. My wife and youngest child, Silas, are out of town, so I'm planning to take the other three kids -- ages 6, 4, and (as of this coming Sunday) 2, to hear her speak. I e-mailed her and asked if I should bother. The two girls will be well behaved, but the young boy is a wild card. She encouraged us all to come out! So, barring any illnesses -- Naomi, my oldest, said her throat felt sore tonight -- I'll be there with the kids. It's a roll of the dice, but it's my 38th birthday tomorrow, and I'm up for the challenge.

Here's Nina's Events page, which links to other articles of interest.

Edited by Christian, 07 November 2008 - 08:57 PM.


#6 Christian

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 02:07 PM

Good news for those who watch their carbs:

Pour on the olive oil: Big study finds Mediterranean-style diet cuts heart attack, stroke risk

I'm still an Atkins fan, and Atkins and the Mediterreanean-style South Beach Diet went after each other for years. Atkins has moved toward the South Beach model in recent years; I don't know if South Beach has moved toward Atkins. The report here of the diet specifics sounds very Atkins-friendly, but I'd have to see the actual study to figure out how similar or different the study's approach was. My own view of the competing diets is that they were close together and had exaggerated differences in comparison to the low-fat approaches to eating that so many people try. This study is pretty clear on that contrast:

Those who ate Mediterranean-style with lots of olive oil or nuts had a 30 percent lower risk of major cardiovascular problems compared to others who were told to follow a low-fat diet. Mediterranean meant lots of fruit, fish, chicken, beans, tomato sauce, salads, and wine and little baked goods and pastries. ...

People in the study were not given rigid menus or calorie goals because weight loss was not the aim. That could be why they found the “diets” easy to stick with — only about 7 percent dropped out within two years. There were twice as many dropouts in the low-fat group than among those eating Mediterranean-style.

Edited by Christian, 25 February 2013 - 02:11 PM.


#7 Christian

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 04:55 AM

Josh Hurst has posted elsewhere that he recently completed an eating program called "whole30."

 

What's that all about, Josh? 



#8 Josh Hurst

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 08:56 AM

I did complete the whole30, Christian-- and it was transofrmative.

 

More information about the program can be found here, though for anyone who might want to do it, I really recomemend reading the book, It Starts with Food.

 

Essentially, this is a month-long, modified (read: more rigorous) Paleo diet, emphasizing organic meats, vegetables, and fruits, while eliminating sugar, alcohol, dairy, legumes, grains, and processed foods. It's intended not as a weight loss program per se, but as a kind of nutritional reset for your body.

 

My own results from the 30 days:

 

- I lost 20+ pounds.

- I kicked sugar cravings. In fact, I had a bite of something with added sugar yesterday, for the first time in more than a month, and it made me quiver.

- I've kicked between-meal snacking and stress/boredom eating (big problems for me, as I work from home and therefore have a full kitchen of food constantly available to me).

- I eat big breakfast and lunch meals but consume very few calories in the back stretch of the day.

- I don't get hungry between meals.

- I have A LOT more energy.

- I have isolated some food allergies-- including, I am sorry to say, the fact that I am apparently lactose intolerant.

- I feel like I have much more self-control when it comes to food; in fact, while my whole30 technically ended on Sunday, I have still not eaten anything that's not compliant with the program, as I'm enjoying its benefits far too much!

 

I would recommend this to anyone, truthfully.



#9 Christian

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 11:50 AM

Great! Give us a sample day's meals. What constitutes "big breakfast and lunch meals," and also, what comprises "very few calories in the back stretch of the day"?

 

I ask because reading a book often provides guidelines, and maybe some sample meal suggestions. But how those work out in reality can differ for those trying to follow a plan.

 

EDIT: I just looked at the Partners List on the linked site. Are you, by chance, doing CrossFit?


Edited by Christian, 04 April 2014 - 11:51 AM.


#10 Josh Hurst

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 12:32 PM

Christian, the basic recommendation is that eat meal consists of a protein (about the size of your fist) surrounded by vegetables on the plate, as well as a handful-size serving of "good fat" (olives, pistachios, avacado...) and ~2 servings of fruit somewhere throughout the day.

 

For lunch just now, for instance, I had a baked chicken thigh and homemade pesto (leftover from last night), some baked kale, a sweet potato, and some baked mushrooms, plus a few olives and an orange. My breakfast is usually something equivalent, but with a cup of coffee. For dinner last night, though, I just had a small taco salad-- mostly vegetables, with just enough meat to give some flavor.

 

Typing all of this now, I realize that it sounds like a lot of food-- and it is-- but really and truly: I've lost 20+ pounds and gone down in both my shirt and pants sizes!

 

The book does have sample meal plans and several recipes, though honestly, I didn't try any of them-- there are many great whole30 and paleo-themed blogs out there.