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#61 Tyler

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Posted 14 September 2010 - 05:36 PM

I have a ticket to see a conversation with David Letterman and Biz Stone (founder of Twitter) this Friday. I might walk out if they don't limit their responses to 140 characters each.

#62 Darrel Manson

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 09:12 AM

I'm now there.

#63 Peter T Chattaway

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 11:48 AM



#64 J. Henry Waugh

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 09:30 PM

I am not a blogger but an esteemed blog commenter.

Similarly, I have a twitter account that I check on my phone where I never post, but I love following bright, informed people. So far I only follow journalists and authors, but I'm willing to break my no celebrity policy if there are any artists of the type we discuss 'round these parts of interest.

Any suggestions?

#65 Jason Panella

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 11:27 AM

Well, one celebrity that I almost always get a chuckle out of is Nathan Fillion (NathanFillion). He does tweet a lot, though. And while he's not a big celebrity per se, Superchunk/Mountain Goats/Jay Farrar drummer Jon Wurster (JonWurster) is an absolute riot.

Don't know if these help!

#66 J.A.A. Purves

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 05:50 AM

I'm now the proud owner of this T-shirt.

#67 Tyler

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Posted 03 February 2011 - 02:10 PM

Worst Tweet ever?

Millions are in uproar in #Cairo. Rumor is they heard our new spring collection is now available online at http://bit.ly/KCairo -KC



#68 Tyler

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 05:34 PM

Time's list of the 140 best Twitter feeds.

#69 Overstreet

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 01:22 PM

A new hashtag: #MovieTitlesYouShouldNotMixUp

#70 Tyler

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 11:53 PM

#LiteraryTurducken

#71 Tyler

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 11:10 AM

#InaccurateSpoilers

#72 Peter T Chattaway

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 03:41 PM

Teens Don't Tweet; Twitter's Growth Not Fueled By Youth
Twitter's footprint has expanded impressively in the first half of 2009, reaching 10.7 percent of all active Internet users in June. Perhaps even more impressively, this growth has come despite a lack of widespread adoption by children, teens, and young adults. In June 2009, only 16 percent of Twitter.com website users were under the age of 25. Bear in mind persons under 25 make up nearly one quarter of the active US Internet universe, which means that Twitter.com effectively under-indexes on the youth market by 36 percent.
Nielsen Wire, July 30

Twitter: No matter what Hollywood thinks, it's totally uncool for kids
When I had a little downtime with this year's Summer Movie Posse, I asked them how they kept up with the buzz about movies. As you might expect, they spent a lot of time online, which gives them a chance to look at trailers or hear word of mouth about upcoming movies on their friends' Facebook pages or sites like Slashfilm.com or Comingsoon.net.
But when I asked whether they kept abreast of things via Twitter, they all looked at me like I was crazy. Rajiv Rao, who's 17, said "I don't know one high schooler that uses Twitter." His friend, Arya Zarifi, also 17, added: "It's something for adults who feel like it makes them hip or something."
Yalda Chalabi, 17, was especially dismissive of actors and celebrities who use Twitter as a self-promotional tool. "I hate it when they say, 'Follow me on Twitter,' as if we're interested in every little thing they have to say," she explained. "It's just an adult thing. Our music teacher kept saying that she would put stuff up for us to follow on Twitter until one day she said, 'OK, who's following me on Twitter?' And no one raised their hand. You keep hearing people talk about it, but I don't know anyone my age that uses it." . . .
Patrick Goldstein, Los Angeles Times, May 4

Teens join Twitter to escape parents on Facebook: survey
Teens don't tweet, will never tweet – too public, too many older users. Not cool.
That's been the prediction for a while now, born of numbers showing that fewer than one in 10 teens were using Twitter early on.
But then their parents, grandparents, neighbours, parents' friends and anyone in-between started friending them on Facebook, the social networking site of choice for many — and a curious thing began to happen. . . .
The growing popularity teens report fits with findings from the Pew Internet & American Life Project, a non-profit organization that monitors people's tech-based habits. The migration has been slow, but steady. A Pew survey last July found that 16 per cent of young people, ages 12 to 17, said they used Twitter. Two years earlier, that percentage was just eight per cent. . . .
“The first group to colonize Twitter were people in the technology industry — consummate self-promoters,” says Alice Marwick, a post-doctoral researcher at Microsoft Research, who tracks young people's online habits.
For teens, self-promotion isn't usually the goal. At least until they go to college and start thinking about careers, social networking is, well, social.
But as Twitter has grown, so have the ways people, and communities, use it. . . .
Associated Press, January 30

#73 J.A.A. Purves

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 04:30 PM

Hey everyone, now you can keep twittering after you're dead.

#74 Jason Panella

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 02:44 PM

One of my favorite Twitter accounts is someone pretending to be Garth Brooks pretending to be a rock star. I realize this is going go have a limited audience, but he (or she) cracks me up merely be existing.

#75 Christian

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:38 AM

My Twitter activity has skyrocketed in the past year, much to my surprise, but Twitter still unnerves me at times. I'd appreciate hearing how others have handled new followers that might make you uncomfortable. In the past week, I had someone -- or some organization/group (I have many non-people following me) -- with a particular viewpoint (according to the person's/group's description) follow me. Within a couple of days, a few more such people followed me.

 

I don't want to get more specific than that -- I assume others here have experienced being followed by people/causes they don't necessarily sign on to -- but am wondering how you handle this. More followers on Twitter is, I suppose, a nice problem to have, but I'm wondering if the groundwork is being laid for other problems. I don't know what I might have tweeted that led to being followed by these folks, but my concern is that future tweets from me might be off-putting to these people/groups. I'm not seeking that out; I'm just saying it could happen.

 

Here's the core issue: I don't want Twitter to turn into a place for fighting and strife the same way my Facebook feed did over the years. Obviously, I'm not fully in control of that. But to the extent I can follow -- and be followed -- by people I know won't be overly hostile toward me and my viewpoints, I'd like to encourage that. So, do I block other people who have followed me but whom I suspect won't like some of what I have to say, even though they liked something I tweeted enough to follow me in the first place? Do I wait for things to become an actual problem rather than an imagined/anticipated problem? Or take some other approach?



#76 Jason Panella

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:50 AM

 

Here's the core issue: I don't want Twitter to turn into a place for fighting and strife the same way my Facebook feed did over the years. Obviously, I'm not fully in control of that. But to the extent I can follow -- and be followed -- by people I know won't be overly hostile toward me and my viewpoints, I'd like to encourage that. So, do I block other people who have followed me but whom I suspect won't like some of what I have to say, even though they liked something I tweeted enough to follow me in the first place? Do I wait for things to become an actual problem rather than an imagined/anticipated problem? Or take some other approach?

 

Nine times out of ten, these people (or non-people) will unfollow you on their own within a few days. Most likely they followed you because you tweeted something remotely relevant to them, or because you're recommended to them through that little sidebar. After they see you're either not tweeting a thousand times a day (and thus not a "influencer," or whatever), or if they don't like what you're saying, they'll bail. Happens to me all of the time.



#77 Christian

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 12:27 PM

Ah, that's reassuring. Thanks, Jason.



#78 Rushmore

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 10:38 PM

Nine times out of ten, these people (or non-people) will unfollow you on their own within a few days. Most likely they followed you because you tweeted something remotely relevant to them, or because you're recommended to them through that little sidebar. After they see you're either not tweeting a thousand times a day (and thus not a "influencer," or whatever), or if they don't like what you're saying, they'll bail. Happens to me all of the time.

In a related issue, lately I've been followed (and then shortly unfollowed, and sometimes followed more than once, which is when I bring out the block button) by about a dozen Nietzschebots. Apparently Nietzsche-quoting Twitter accounts are popular enough that there are a lot of spammers who think quoting Nietzsche interspersed with spam and cllickbait is a good way to reach their audience.
 
The whole Nietzsche Twitter problem is actually quite interesting. Many of Nietzsche's aphorisms are very well suited to Twitter, and I'd like to think that someone out there is fully taking advantage of that fact. But the most popular Nietzsche account, @NietzscheQuotes, is unsatisfactory: it recycles far too few quotations over and over, and seems to be run by someone who actually spends more time reading Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris, emphasizing cheap potshots at faith and banal encomiums to rationality, which it then spices up with endless reiterations of a few of the juicier statements on the nature of women. Nietzsche-quoting could be much more interesting than this. The other, less legitimate accounts, even the ones that aren't blatantly spam-driven, are even more deficient. I'm considering starting my own Nietzsche account just to fill this void, but in order to do so I would have to go back and supplement my one semester's study of Nietzsche with some serious independent reading and review. Perhaps that would be a plus.


Edited by Rushmore, 14 July 2014 - 10:38 PM.