Jump to content


Photo

The Pirates! Band of Misfits


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 Peter T Chattaway

Peter T Chattaway

    He's fictional, but you can't have everything.

  • Member
  • 29,503 posts

Posted 14 July 2011 - 01:33 PM


Edited by Peter T Chattaway, 17 November 2011 - 10:04 AM.


#2 mrmando

mrmando

    Lassie, the Barbarian Musical Thinker

  • Member
  • 3,636 posts

Posted 14 July 2011 - 02:15 PM

A pirate movie with the Ramones on the soundtrack can't be all bad...

#3 Peter T Chattaway

Peter T Chattaway

    He's fictional, but you can't have everything.

  • Member
  • 29,503 posts

Posted 17 November 2011 - 10:03 AM



#4 Attica

Attica

    Celtic Creation Mystic, Film Buff- -oon

  • Member
  • 1,870 posts

Posted 17 November 2011 - 10:51 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzIxECXjW1I






We'll this looks kind of fun. Is it just me though, or does this trailer seem more Hollywoodish, and less of what was known as the "quaint English" style and humour of Aradmans earlier films.

#5 Buckeye Jones

Buckeye Jones

    Killer of threads

  • Member
  • 1,720 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 01:29 PM

Saw it last night. Not quite as sharp as the Wallace and Gromits, or even Chicken Run. Still, had enough visual delight and running gags (the sponge beard) to keep the whole family (except the four year old) entertained. The four year old got bored, and I must admit, my eyelids were pretty droopy in the middle act.

#6 Attica

Attica

    Celtic Creation Mystic, Film Buff- -oon

  • Member
  • 1,870 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 09:51 PM

Saw it last night. Not quite as sharp as the Wallace and Gromits, or even Chicken Run. Still, had enough visual delight and running gags (the sponge beard) to keep the whole family (except the four year old) entertained. The four year old got bored, and I must admit, my eyelids were pretty droopy in the middle act.


The wife and I saw it last night as well. I thought it was great fun. The Animation, characters, and sets were amazing, and I enjoyed the story and jokes fairly well. It was really zany at times without ever really becoming unhinged.

When we were talking about it earlier this evening my wife said that it was already becoming forgetable though. I'm afraid I have to agree. We both think that the film doesn't have meaningful enough themes in it to become memorable.


Oh. And I expect I was right in my earlier post.... it does seem to be a bit more Hollywoodish than their other films.

Edited by Attica, 28 April 2012 - 10:01 PM.


#7 SDG

SDG

    Catholic deflector shield

  • Moderator
  • 8,996 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 11:55 AM

My written review and 60-second video review.

Gadzooks, is this movie bonkers. I mean, really. You would never know from the trailers — the American trailers, I mean — just how outrageous it is...

Following last year’s Santa story Arthur Christmas, The Pirates! marks a return to form for Aardman, in more ways than one. Most obviously, where Arthur Christmas was computer-animated, The Pirates! is a welcome return to stop-motion animation. Not that there’s anything wrong with computer animation, but everybody’s doing it...

The material also seems, to me, a better fit for Aardman’s sensibilities. The studio’s trademark playfulness was certainly in evidence in Arthur Christmas, but that movie suffered from an elusive lack of Christmas spirit, even in Santa’s own family. There was a naive sweetness to the globe-spanning plot coming down to whether a single girl in Cornwall would get her Christmas present, but with it was an off-putting implication that Christmas would be ruined without a present. (Even The Grinch knew better than that!)...

The Pirates! isn’t as inspired as Wallace and Gromit, nor does it match Chicken Run for genre satire or character development. Yet what it lacks in cohesion and discipline, it makes up for in freewheeling creativity and endless attention to detail.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8rzgHkajsc

A pirate movie with the Ramones on the soundtrack can't be all bad...

Thanks goodness, no: Just in the American trailers. And I love that when the rats start dancing, instead of hip-hop, they're doing Irish step dancing!

Not quite as sharp as the Wallace and Gromits, or even Chicken Run.

No, but wackier and more daring than either. From the highly irreverent depictions of Charles Darwin and Queen Victoria to various other 19th-century cameos, I kept shaking my head in disbelief that they were going there.

Still, had enough visual delight and running gags (the sponge beard) to keep the whole family (except the four year old) entertained. The four year old got bored, and I must admit, my eyelids were pretty droopy in the middle act.

We went down to five years old, and I can't say I noticed anyone getting bored.

The wife and I saw it last night as well. I thought it was great fun. The Animation, characters, and sets were amazing, and I enjoyed the story and jokes fairly well. It was really zany at times without ever really becoming unhinged.

Says who it wasn't unhinged? Maybe we just have different standards of unhinged. I don't think I used that word in my review (though it was in the draft a couple of times), but I used bonkers and outrageous, and in my 60-second review I called it insane.

When we were talking about it earlier this evening my wife said that it was already becoming forgetable though. I'm afraid I have to agree. We both think that the film doesn't have meaningful enough themes in it to become memorable.

It's almost completely substance free, I think. Still, the sheer creative daring and lunacy and the almost poetic nuttiness of the lines ("Sure…some of you are closer to being a chair or coat rack than a pirate…and some of you are fish I've just dressed up in a hat"; "You'll be laughing on the other sides of your faces…and believe me, that is very painful thing to do!") are pretty memorable by my lights.

Oh. And I expect I was right in my earlier post.... it does seem to be a bit more Hollywoodish than their other films.

Compared to Arthur Christmas? Or even Chicken Run? I wouldn't say so.

Edited by SDG, 29 April 2012 - 11:57 AM.


#8 Attica

Attica

    Celtic Creation Mystic, Film Buff- -oon

  • Member
  • 1,870 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 01:19 PM

SDG said:


:Says who it wasn't unhinged? Maybe we just have different standards of unhinged. I don't think I used that word in my review (though it was in the draft a couple of times), but I used bonkers and outrageous, and in my 60-second review I called it insane.


Oh... I think I was using a slightly different meaning for unhinged. I was meaning that the film was zany but the story never fell apart. The film had the wonderful ability to go completely nuts and yet not go off the rails. I was using unhinged in a good sense.

I thought something similar about the irreverent depiction of Queen Victoria. That's pretty wild considering it came out of an English studio.



:It's almost completely substance free, I think. Still, the sheer creative daring and lunacy and the almost poetic nuttiness of the lines ("Sure…some of you are closer to being a chair or coat rack than a pirate…and some of you are fish I've just dressed up in a hat"; "You'll be laughing on the other sides of your faces…and believe me, that is very painful thing to do!") are pretty memorable by my lights.


I'd like it to become memorable for people, because I really thought it was a remarkable film at the time I saw it (it was technically amazing). It's not "sticking" with me much right now though, even the lines you quoted, which along with others were delightfully wonky.


:Compared to Arthur Christmas? Or even Chicken Run? I wouldn't say so.


I didn't know Aardman made Arthur Christmas and I never saw it. I was thinking more along the lines of "Flushed Away" (which was made with Dreamworks but did have many of Aardmans sensiblities), Chicken Run and Wallace and Gromit.

I dunno. I didn't see as much of that dry quaint British humour that can be found in their other films, even Chicken Run with the quirky hens and such. But mind.... I suppose the sheer nuttiness and outrageousness in the film could also be considered to be of a separate, but probably linked, tradition of English humour, in the vein of Monty Python (or maybe even Benny Hill). I'd have to ask one of my English raised friends about the idea of there being slightly separate traditions of English humour...... which could have come out of their fairly distinct social classes.

Edited by Attica, 29 April 2012 - 01:50 PM.


#9 Peter T Chattaway

Peter T Chattaway

    He's fictional, but you can't have everything.

  • Member
  • 29,503 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 04:54 PM

Loved your review, SDG; the bit about Queen Vicky resembling Mrs Tweedy, in particular, was one of those "oh, of course! Why didn't *I* think of that?" moments.

I thought the film was a hoot, myself, though I have to admit I was glad, adterwards, that I hadn't brought any of my kids.

#10 SDG

SDG

    Catholic deflector shield

  • Moderator
  • 8,996 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 07:53 PM

Loved your review, SDG; the bit about Queen Vicky resembling Mrs Tweedy, in particular, was one of those "oh, of course! Why didn't *I* think of that?" moments.

The climatic scene in some ways reversing the climax of Chicken Run, with Darwin hanging by a rope from a flying machine while Queen Vicky tries to cut it from above with a blunt instrument, made the connection particularly obvious.

I thought the film was a hoot, myself, though I have to admit I was glad, adterwards, that I hadn't brought any of my kids.

I can see that. Though I had my four middle kids, and never regretted bringing them.

#11 SDG

SDG

    Catholic deflector shield

  • Moderator
  • 8,996 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 08:00 PM

Also, can I just say any family film that makes my son David turn to me and say "Douglas Fairbanks!" is A-OK with me. (The pirates recapitulate, and also refer to, Fairbanks' famous stunt riding a knife-blade down a sail in The Black Pirate.)

Edited by SDG, 29 April 2012 - 08:00 PM.


#12 Buckeye Jones

Buckeye Jones

    Killer of threads

  • Member
  • 1,720 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 09:13 PM

SDG, I think I enjoy your enthusiasm for the film more than I enjoyed the film itself. My boys aren't great readers yet, so they missed the baking soda gags. Many a time I've had to clean the kitchen counters because of their experiments

#13 Peter T Chattaway

Peter T Chattaway

    He's fictional, but you can't have everything.

  • Member
  • 29,503 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 09:38 PM

FWIW, Cartoon Brew is reporting that this film had the lowest North American opening of any Aardman film released to date (an estimated $11.4 million, vs. the $12.1 million that their previous lowest, Arthur Christmas, opened to; their highwater mark remains the $18.8 million that Flushed Away opened to in 2006).

This film also scored the fifth-highest wide-release opening of any stop-motion film ever, behind two Aardman efforts (Chicken Run, Wallace & Gromit), Coraline and Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (the last of which played for a week in just five theatres before opening to $19.1 million in wide release -- which is currently the record for this particular form of animation).

Note: This post has been edited from an earlier version that contained incorrect information about Aardman's box-office record.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway, 29 April 2012 - 10:12 PM.


#14 Attica

Attica

    Celtic Creation Mystic, Film Buff- -oon

  • Member
  • 1,870 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 10:37 PM

FWIW, Cartoon Brew is reporting that this film had the lowest North American opening of any Aardman film released to date


I had noticed that there was a suprisingly small crowd of only about a 1/2 full theatre at the 6:45 Friday night showing that I had attended. A time, when I would have thought the theatre would be packed full of parents and their kids.

Edited by Attica, 30 April 2012 - 12:37 AM.


#15 Attica

Attica

    Celtic Creation Mystic, Film Buff- -oon

  • Member
  • 1,870 posts

Posted 30 April 2012 - 01:02 AM

So. I talked with one of my English friends about the idea of separate traditions in English humour. Here's the gist of what he said. Any English folks on the board can feel free to correct me if this is wrong.

He more or less said that humour isn't necessarily related to different traditions coming fom different classes, but there were comedy shows and films that some classes preferred over others.

The Benny Hill show was beloved by much of the "working class folks", but not as much by the "upperclass", while the Monty Python guys were upperclass, and came out of the English universities. To my friends understanding their humour was sophisticated in a way that some of the working class people wouldn't get, or find funny. In England a lot of comedy worked its way up through the clubs where the working class frequented, but because the Python group came out of the"elite universities" they didn't take this route.

The Aardman films are a little different in that films like Wallace and Gromit are distinctly about working class people (he says that Wallace would be very much working class) but are films and humour that all (I use that term loosely) of English society appreciates.

My friend hasn't seen Pirates yet so I don't know what his take on the various jokes and characters in it would be.


To be honest it feels a little weird and uncomfortable for me to even write this stuff about "classes" because any sort of class system is pretty much foreign to my upbringing and worldview. The Canadian prairies is a very different society in this regard. I find Monty Python, the Aardman films, and some (emphasis on some) of Benny Hill to be pretty funny, but of course with slightly different reasons for liking each show, without completely understanding the English' societal perceptions.

Edited by Attica, 30 April 2012 - 01:06 AM.


#16 Peter T Chattaway

Peter T Chattaway

    He's fictional, but you can't have everything.

  • Member
  • 29,503 posts

Posted 30 April 2012 - 01:17 PM

I think we definitely have "class" systems in North America, but I might be more sensitive to this because my father is British and he, in turn, communicated some of his own sensitivity to me and my siblings. (Add to this the fact that my mother was born to Mennonite peasants and didn't speak a word of English when she moved to this country at age 16, etc.)

A lot of this class sensitivity was, as you hint, predicated on the question of one's education. For my father, it was a big, big deal that he was the first member of his family to have a bachelor's degree (and, in more recent years, that my sister was the first member of the family tree to have a master's degree). Ironically, HIS father apparently didn't like the university-education thing -- he reportedly had a sort of "Do you think you're better than I am?" attitude about it -- but I believe my grandfather was, himself, the first person on the family tree to finish high school (or the British equivalent of it).

For what it's worth, my father never expressed any interest in Monty Python -- I discovered them in my college years -- but he DID turn us on to Fawlty Towers when we were young, and it has remained a family favorite ever since. (We never, ever went anywhere near Benny Hill.)

#17 Attica

Attica

    Celtic Creation Mystic, Film Buff- -oon

  • Member
  • 1,870 posts

Posted 30 April 2012 - 02:33 PM

Peter T Chattaway said:

:I think we definitely have "class" systems in North America, but I might be more sensitive to this because my father is British and he, in turn, communicated some of his own sensitivity to me and my siblings. (Add to this the fact that my mother was born to Mennonite peasants and didn't speak a word of English when she moved to this country at age 16, etc.)



I was pondering over the idea of "class" systems in North America before I wrote that last post, and I'm actually not sure what to think on that. There are definitely "systems" in place largely due to colour, heritage, or culture. I grew up in a small prairie town where any sort of class system just wasn't readily apparent. The local gasp pump attendant and the town's doctor would happily sit together in the bar on a Saturday night and there was no sense that the local gas pump guy wouldn't be able to decide to go to university and become a doctor if he so chose.

But then when I got married and talked with my father in law (who has some Eastern European roots) about these things he had said that in Manitoba people whose names ended in "ski" ,or such like, often had a hard time getting a job. I'm not sure if that's related to "class" systems or just cultural prejudice.

My understanding of the class system in England is that when one is born into the working class they largely consider this to be their lot in life, as part of the culture and function of the country, and that they view the "upperclass" as having a certain obligation to care for some of their needs (coming from the idea of Lords caring for those in their lands). I'm not sure how much I see this sort of system in Canada (although it might be there to a certain extent). But I'd think that in Canada we lean more towards putting responsibility on the government to care for us (hence the accusations of us being too "socialist" by some of the more conservative of our neighbours to the South), and of course people in the government often come from what might possibly be considered an "upperclass". But certainly not always, I can think of several people who wouldn't fit this mold.

I'm not a sure about parts of the States, but I'd say that in Canada university education is available and encouraged for all people, whearas in some countries that have more of a class system people in the lower classes wouldn't even really consider this sort of higher education an option. Or of course in some cases it absolutely wouldn't be an option.

So maybe any type of class system in Canada wouldn't be as much linked to how the country functions (or desires to function), as much as it would be linked to any subcultures, heritage groups, ect..... and ways of thinking related to being part of these different groups, that we can often fall into. Whearas in a country like England it's more directly related to how their society would function, being that they would be more inclined towards each class having roles to fill that would help care for their societies needs.

If that makes any sense.



:For what it's worth, my father never expressed any interest in Monty Python -- I discovered them in my college years -- but he DID turn us on to Fawlty Towers when we were young, and it has remained a family favorite ever since. (We never, ever went anywhere near Benny Hill.)



When I was talking with my English friend he had expressed some wonder that Monty Python is still as much part of the cultural milieu in North America as it is. He says that in England people largely moved on from Monty Python decades ago. I replied that in the 90's MTV started playing some of the old Monty Python shows and that this was probably at least partly responsible for a resurgence of interest here. That was the time when I discovered Monty Python.

I had heard of Fawlty Towers for years but didn't see it until I rented the box set a couple of years back. My wife and I both loved it, every episode progressively moved into more and more hilarity.

When it comes to Benny Hill I think it would largely depend on what era of the program one is viewing. Some of his earlier stuff from the seventies is very silly and a little naughty, and at times quite funny. But as the show moved on into the 80's it progressively became less silly and more naughty.... if you catch my drift.

Edited by Attica, 30 April 2012 - 05:13 PM.


#18 Peter T Chattaway

Peter T Chattaway

    He's fictional, but you can't have everything.

  • Member
  • 29,503 posts

Posted 30 April 2012 - 02:51 PM

Attica wrote:
: But then when I got married and talked with my father in law (who has some Eastern European roots) about these things he had said that in Manitoba people whose names ended in "ski" ,or such like . . .

Heh. I'm a Sawatzky on my mother's side. (And since my father was an only child, whereas my mother had four brothers, pretty much all of my relatives have the surname Sawatzky... except for the few female cousins who got married and changed their last names.)

#19 Attica

Attica

    Celtic Creation Mystic, Film Buff- -oon

  • Member
  • 1,870 posts

Posted 06 May 2012 - 10:36 PM

Attica wrote:
: But then when I got married and talked with my father in law (who has some Eastern European roots) about these things he had said that in Manitoba people whose names ended in "ski" ,or such like . . .

Heh. I'm a Sawatzky on my mother's side. (And since my father was an only child, whereas my mother had four brothers, pretty much all of my relatives have the surname Sawatzky... except for the few female cousins who got married and changed their last names.)



I had missed this post.

I'm not sure what your getting at? Did your mother's side experience cultural prejudice?

My Father in Law's family didn't have a name ending in "ski" or "zky", but they do have an Hungarian name and to my understanding my wifes father, and especially grandparents, did have some problems related to prejudice. Not so much in our era though.

I'm sure you know that Southern Manitoba is chock full of Mennonite folk. I grew up near the Western part of the province where a great number of names began with "Mac...". There was never really any great conflict amongst the different cultures here, but certainly cultural misunderstanding at times. Several of my best friends are Mennonite (even when we don't always fully understand each other - including certain Christian faith perspectives).

Edited by Attica, 07 May 2012 - 01:51 AM.


#20 Peter T Chattaway

Peter T Chattaway

    He's fictional, but you can't have everything.

  • Member
  • 29,503 posts

Posted 07 May 2012 - 11:27 PM

Attica wrote:
: Did your mother's side experience cultural prejudice?

She never lived in the prairies (I think the first time she ever visited that part of the country was when I attended Bible school in Saskatchewan), but I'm told that things were difficult, at least at first, because she didn't speak any English when she came to Canada (at the age of 16, so she spent her first few years here finishing high school; however, she did graduate from a Mennonite school, so the cultural divide wasn't as bad as it could have been).

: I'm sure you know that Southern Manitoba is chock full of Mennonite folk.

OH yes. :)