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'The Week'


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#1 Christian

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 12:05 PM

I’ve just sent off a come-on for a 4-week trial subscription. With the Weekly Standard and Atlantic showing up weekly and monthly, respectively, I’ve got more than enough to read at home, but The Week – which has been advertising in The Weekly Standard – is apparently quite addictive. I don’t think it has any original articles, but is instead a compilation of press reports from the U.S. and from around the world.

I’ve picked up the magazine at the bookstore a couple of times and have flipped through it. I can’t say it drew me in, but I could see the potential.

I bookmarked the magazine’s Web site a while back, but I don’t find that I visit it too often. My hunch is that, with so many other sites on my bookmark page, and with two daily newspaper subscriptions, I get enough news I can use throughout the day, and each week. But the offer of four free issues, with the option to cancel when I get the invoice, has finally won me over.

If anyone subscribes to The Week, I’d be curious to know how you use it. Does it fill in some holes that otherwise would go unfilled? Is the format sufficient in itself, or does it simply spur you to want to subscribe to the various publications highlighted by The Week?

I’ll end with this odd note over the International Opinion column of The Week’s Web site today:

Good Day For:
21st century Islam, after a bank in Indonesia set up a service for customers to donate money for Eid sacrifices at their local ATM. In the past, Muslims had to buy, slaughter, and donate the animals to the hungry in person.

--THAT’S something I wouldn’t have heard about had I not been reading The Week!


#2 Christian

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 10:51 AM

I’m enjoying my trial subscription to “The Week,” which includes several snippets under the headings “Good Week For…” and “Bad Week for…”

Here’s one from the latest issue:

Bad Week For
Obsessions, after a British Trekkie was forced to file for bankruptcy because he spent hundreds of thousands of dollars turning his home into a replica of the Starship Enterprise. “I’m still proud of what I created,” said Tony Alleyne, “but it’s been a financial disaster.” Recently, his wife left him when he replaced their fridge with a “warp coil.”

Edited by Christian, 13 February 2006 - 10:53 AM.


#3 Christian

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Posted 23 February 2006 - 12:14 PM

From the Week's Web site.

Good Week For
Sin, after a study by Brigham Young University found that Mormons weighed an average of 4.6 pounds more than other Utahans, and were more likely to be obese. Researchers said Mormons were compensating for not drinking, smoking, and fornicating by stuffing themselves with food.

Bad Week For
The Spanish Winter Olympics team, which had every piece of its luggage lost by an airline en route to Turin, Italy, including skis and snowboards. “Things haven’t started well,” said Alejandro Blanco, head of the Spanish Olympic Committee.



#4 Christian

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 02:02 PM

OK, we signed up for a year's subscription. But for all the fun snippets of info in The Week, the best thing I've read so far in the magazine is this piece on the growing market for ... brace yourselves ... human body parts. Very troubling, but, uh, informative. The article ran just one page in the print edition -- long by the magazine's standards -- but it packs in quite a bit. Very succinct:

What happened to Cooke’s bones?
A day after the Masterpiece Theatre host died of cancer last March, at age 95, his body was cut open at a New York City funeral home, and his bones were removed. An investigation by the Brooklyn District Attorney’s office revealed that the bones were then sold by a middleman for $7,000 to two transplant companies, which in turn may have supplied them to various hospitals. Cooke had bone cancer, but documents supplied to the hospitals claimed that the bones belonged to an 85-year-old heart attack victim and were cancer-free. Cooke’s remains were subsequently cremated, and his family—unaware of the desecration—scattered his ashes in New York’s Central Park, in accordance with his wishes. Family members learned about the purloined bones only a few months ago. They were shocked, but authorities weren’t. ...

#5 Christian

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 04:10 PM

Good Week For

Cultural sensitivity, after British nursery schools changed the lyric of the rhyme 'Baa baa, black sheep' to 'Baa baa, rainbow sheep,' so as not to offend dark-skinned people. 'What on earth is a rainbow sheep?' one parent wanted to know.


#6 Christian

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 10:58 AM

Hollywood Reporter film writer/blogger Anne Thompson has a new favorite magazine:

Now Time is becoming more like Newsweek, which has long embraced more individual voices. I scarf up both of these mags (along with EW, The New Yorker and New York), every week. I also love The Week, which has editors trawling for the best stories all over the world. I just read a fascinating piece that was culled from a book called Washed Up: The Curious Journeys of Flotsam and Jetsam, about tons of eddying trash in the ocean. Who knew?

--I just read the same piece this morning, and it's fascinating.

Edited by Christian, 21 December 2006 - 10:59 AM.


#7 Plot Device

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 08:18 AM

I used to subscribe to it about four years ago, back when I had the money to spend on subscriptions. I loved this magazine. When I read it cover to cover I came away with the (delusional??) satisfaction that I was then COMPLETELY informed on everything and was totally hip to what was going on in the world.

Now I have no money so I just watch the Daily Show.

#8 Tony Watkins

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 08:55 AM

I used to subscribe to the British edition (which came first, I wonder? I assumed at the time - 10 years ago probably - that it was a UK thing. But life for Brits always brings surprises about things which are so part of our cultural life that we don't realise they've come from somewhere else. I still remember the surprise I experienced as a child to discover that Kellogg's, Heinz and Mars were not native British firms). It was great - a masterpiece of editing to just the right tone and length as well as a good eye for great stories. I regret stopping it (I reached a point where I didn't have time to read even this!) and keep thinking I should restart my subscription. Maybe now I will.

#9 Christian

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 08:57 PM

The Week has revamped its Web site to include more of each issue. I haven't had time to explore the site yet, but this week's issue of the print magazine comes wrapped in a glossy promo about the upgraded site. It promises links to the full material (published elsewhere) that is excerpted in each print issue.

If the site is as addictive as the print magazine, I'll be checking it regularly.

#10 Christian

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 12:53 PM

David Carr in the NY Times:

Perhaps it is a personal problem, one born of having the attention span of a gnat and being too jacked-in for my own good. Yes, I keep The New Yorker on my nightstand, and when it’s time to cook, I page through Cook’s Illustrated in search of something to make, but in general, I seem to be losing the magazine habit.

Felix Dennis, the British raconteur who brought the world the lad magazine Maxim, has my back. His magazine The Week riffs through all the content in the known universe and digests it into a form that can be disposed of in 20 minutes.

“The American magazine industry has been massively overstaffed for years and years. It is one of the most inefficient businesses in the history of the world. And you know what? The chickens are coming home to roost,” Mr. Dennis said. “They can sit around the campfire listening to the scary noises out in the dark, wondering where it all went, but what I would suggest is that they take some of the chickens, skin ’em, and stick ’em on the campfire and start eating.”


#11 Christian

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 09:00 PM

The Wrap looks at the latest circulation numbers for print magazines, and draws a few lessons, including:

4. The Week continues to amaze.
Felix Dennis’ weekly aggregator is holding its own (along with the Economist) in an otherwise dead category. It’s quite easily my favorite magazine for its simple utility -- for that reason alone, it’s bound to outlast Newsweek and Time in print -- yet I have to admit I’m surprised it’s caught on, given the seismic shift of news to television and the Web.


I couldn't be happier. I find myself skipping over the national and international news summaries lately and going straight to the Books and Arts section, as well as the final two-page essay excerpt, which is almost always outstanding.

#12 Christian

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 05:57 PM

The new issue rounds up reviews of Otis Taylor's Contraband -- including Thom Jurek's -- and assigns the album four stars:

Fans will recognize the “textural strangeness” of Taylor’s approach to the blues, said Thom Jurek in AllMusic.com. His guitar and banjo are accompanied here by instruments as diverse as cornet and djembe, while his lyrics—delivered in a distinctive cadence—explore “race, class, and interpersonal relationships in unusual ways.” The sum sounds like no blues you’ve heard, and like all blues in spirit.