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  2. Interesting review, Ken. I was one of those millions watching the original TV movie The Day After, and still remember it as a horrific experience. It certainly cemented my existing conviction that we should do everything in our power to prevent nuclear war.
  3. Retreading some of the ground in articles linked above (and yes, it's published in First Things), Mark Bauerlein's history of the decline of English departments, "Truth, Reading, and Decadence." The emphasis on "identity critics" is over the top, but probably what FT readers want. Along similar lines, a former student found herself in a graduate course on Shakespeare with an instructor whose interest in eco-criticism ovrwhelmed almost anything Shakespeare actually wrote. The student was pretty disgusted.
  4. I'm intrigued and will certainly watch it, but the creator of that trailer could benefit from some Ritalin. Whew, that exhausted me!
  5. Andrew

    There Is No Evil

    Oh yeah - I totally viewed those two stories in that fashion.
  6. Not sure what this says about me, but I keep feel genuine hesitation to answer or make any suggestions because I feel like we've gotten to a point in cancel culture where calling someone "fat," even in a non-derogatory way, will be construed as fat-shaming or contributing to fat-shaming culture. I know that is not what you are doing, just saying that it's really hard for me to answer question because I every time I think of some possible reply, I hear this imaginary reply in my head, "Oh, you think 'x' is FAT? You are part of the problem...."
  7. Ohhh, this is so hard for me to answer. I've been playing a lot of board games and it's hard to separate which one I like the most overall, and which one just had my attention right now… At the top of my “right now” list is A Feast For Odin, which is a very euro worker placement game by Uwe Rosenberg who’s well known for Agricola and Caverna. Even though player interaction is much lighter than most games I like, this core mechanic is this tetris-y tile placement puzzle that is really quite fun. I've been playing it a lot lately. I saw that a lot of interesting games can be found in dndguide
  8. A question I had (as I recall, I saw it in the fall) deals with the use of the song "Bella Ciao" in the 2nd and last stories. I'm tempted to view them in such a way that the 2nd story is projected decades ahead in the final. Anyone else notice that use of music?
  9. A friend, who, like many Christians, disliked or disapproved of the film’s divergence from the novel, recently revised her views based on the recent cultural dialogue around race (and quantum principles). Whether you agree with her take or not, it’s a well written article.
  10. A friend, a woman in her 30s, who by her own account has been fat her whole life, is trying to mitigate the wounds our fat-phobic culture have inflicted. As part of that, she is trying to nurture her imagination by feeding it depictions (in film, books, or TV) of old women who are fat and happy. Can y’all help me start a list for her?
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  12. It's hard not to love an art process documentary that tells you the makers of The Day After showed the entire crew Hiroshima Mon Amour in order to try to get them on the same page about the the devastation of nuclear weapons. This is my favorite documentary of the year so far, not because it champions The Day After (which I don't know if I ever saw) but because it argues that movies can change things, even if the ones that do are always little miracles that somehow defy all the odds as they slouch towards Bethlehem, waiting to be born. http://1morefilmblog.com/2021/06/05/television-
  13. Andrew

    There Is No Evil

    I can see where the second story would've left a negative impression; I'm not a fan of the 'filmed play' feeling either (why I wasn't over the moon about Ma Rainey last year). It was my least favorite episode, but I loved how it then became something more expansive, with a French New Wave sort of energy.
  14. Christian

    There Is No Evil

    I think I was less impressed by this film than you were - but I liked it well enough. I didn't realize we were getting a multi-story, episodic collection here, so the first transition threw me off. Were these the same characters? What's going on? And that second story - it was too didactic, with each character spelling out the moral dilemma/significance of the pending act and of the governmental/military consequences of resistance. (Also, that section of the film felt like a filmed play. I tend to like a lot of films that get dinged as "filmed plays," but the staging here felt unimaginative, e
  15. I've been mostly striking out at this year's Full Frame, and I wonder if it is because of the films or because the virtual festival doesn't quite replicate the film festival experience. I find myself more critical of the films, making because the director isn't right there doing a Q&A or maybe because I'm watching 1-2 films a day over a longer period rather than slamming through many and only remembering the best. Anyhow, this is an engaging film, to be sure, with lots of great anecdotes and generous film clips. I'm not sure that putting the two together does anything that a profile o
  16. Andrew

    Changing the Game

    I think the Connecticut coach - in a plainspoken but sophisticated way - elevates the discussion of fairness from a question of individual winning or losing to a matter of societal fairness and equal opportunity for all, whether cis or trans. His reasoning corresponds to a higher level of Kohlbergian moral development. As the scenes at the TX wrestling match and the CT track and field stands show, many fans are too immature to grasp this. I think the coach's argument also collides head-on with the pathological degree to which middle-aged (and older) Americans depend on high school and colle
  17. I liked the idea of this film -- a focus on the friendship, but the film itself sticks so close to the text and interpretations of Hamlet that it feels as though the angle was a pitch to get it made. I actually liked it...as a rendition of Hamlet. But I don't see how the angle affected the text other than a framing device where Horatio is making the film about Hamlet. So, yeah, he tells Hamlet's story. There was a pointed homoerotic bond implied between the two which didn't bother me but which felt less revolutionary than I think the makers thought it would be. Gonna tr
  18. I did like that it avoids preaching. Clearly, there are some athletic fairness issues involved, but the film doesn't push for a solution to that. I really liked come of the comments in the Connecticut story about the place of sports in an academic setting.
  19. Andrew

    Changing the Game

    I can see why this film has been an award-winner at festivals over the past 1-2 years; it really is engaging and well-crafted storytelling. By following three trans high school athletes, it avoids preachiness in favor of letting the protagonists' lives and lived values predominate. As a humanist who believes part of my mandate is to encourage equality and advocate for society's disadvantaged, I applaud the film's approach to these themes. Folks of a more conservative bent and those identifying a Christian may appreciate the parental figures who see their compassion towards the trans kids in
  20. Joel, I just now clicked on this, and was surprised to see among the participants....MIchial Farmer was a former student of mine a long time ago in a galaxy far, far, away. What a small world we live in....
  21. Social networks are indeed very useful, not only because you can learn many new things, but also by the idea that you can promote your style and your way of thinking there. But everything must be done with caution. If people are interested in your posts, you can easily get a vast audience. Other Instagrammers simply use https://famoid.com/buy-instagram-followers/ to increase the number of subscribers on their profile, and that is acceptable in my opinion. I believe that the main thing for people is to express themselves in the way they feel will be good for themselves.
  22. Good point about the release info. From publicist: "Opens exclusively in theaters on Friday, June 18 in New York (Angelika Film Center and Film at Lincoln Center) and Los Angeles (Laemmle’s Royal and Pasadena’s Laemmle Playhouse 7) followed by a national release" I haven't seen Double Lover, but I want to. I remember thinking in the first twenty minutes of Summer of 85 how *different* it was from By the Grace of God. For awhile I thought I couldn't really pin Ozon's style but more and more I am wondering if that's by design. He seems to adopt style that fits the material rather than looki
  23. Again, my appreciation to you both for highlighting upcoming films from major directors, or films that are worth my time regardless of who directed them. As I've said before, I've simply stopped tracking a lot of stuff that I used to track rather closely, or at least closer than the average Joe. A new Ozon film is a significant event, and if I'd heard about this one, it's since slipped my mind. I'll keep an eye out for Summer of 85 (and will again suggest, without pleading, for information about how/where to watch these recommended films; sure, I can google and figure it out - and I will - but
  24. Andrew

    Summer of 85

    Jessica and I saw this during the online Chicago Film Fest last year and liked it quite a bit, too.
  25. kenmorefield

    Summer of 85

    I don't know what it is about Ozon's work that appeals to me, but I can't remember But really, since In the House, he's been on a five film run or so that reminds me of when I was first falling hard for Kore-eda. Not meaning to imply the two are similar in style, just reaching for some sort of comparison about being aware of a director, liking him (or her) okay, and then all of a sudden having a run of films that elevates your affinity. I also have a tough time describing Ozon's style or sometimes seeing similarities. Summer of 85 is...i don't know, a mash up between John Hughes, E
  26. EDIT: Both the miniseries and the Cusack movie end with Stevie Wonder's "I Believe" (or a cover of it.) There is an element of hope in the lyrics that I find appropriate in the Cusack movie (and the novel) which just comes across as cynicism in the min-series. It's more like Natalie Wood at the end of Miracle on 34th Street -- not really believing but hoping that if one obsessively repeats over and over and over again that one does that it will somehow workout. Also, at the end of the novel, Rob makes .... not a transformation, but some small steps in the direction of self-kno
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