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Peter T Chattaway
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Saw it last night!

I have the same trouble with that scene. The technician is out of line, but Janney answers a misguided comment with an atomic blast. The crowd laughed and cheered for Janney's response, which only increased my discomfort with that moment. God forbid anybody jump to the conclusion that a married couple might be better equipped to raise a child than a 16-year-old! (I think it's a fair thought on the technician's part, although it's certainly insensitive of her to say so in front of Juno.)

I completely agree; the bulk of the theater (which was moderately filled with 20 - 30 couples) laughed and cheered. I felt so uncomfortable because I know that my friends and I were the only people that saw something wrong with the scene.

The only scene in the first part of the film that doesn't work for me is Rainn Wilson's scene. He seems to exist in a different movie, playing in his usual sit-com character mode, where everyone else seems real.

Yeah, and I'll echo Christian's (it was Christian, right?) comment -- the first half hour of the movie where it slogs. Once the Lorings are introduced, the movie really picks up.

But I liked it after I saw it and -- after thinking about it as I've been working this morning -- my appreciation has grown. Yes, I applaud it for the reasons Steven does, but I felt that Juno was filled with concentrated wit; no moral talks like that, and it was as grating as it was funny. But an incredibly observant friend pointed out that he has seen that same hip / cleverness in friends, and it acts as a smokescreen for sadness underneath. I wonder if Juno is like that because of all of the hurt she has?

Gardner was stellar, too; I think she was the best part of the movie. Some gum-snapping girls behind me in the theater were ewwwwww weird-ing her when she was talking to the baby in the mall, but I thought it was a touching scene.

And for the record, I'll take Sonic Youth over twee pop any day.

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Saw it last night!

I have the same trouble with that scene. The technician is out of line, but Janney answers a misguided comment with an atomic blast. The crowd laughed and cheered for Janney's response, which only increased my discomfort with that moment. God forbid anybody jump to the conclusion that a married couple might be better equipped to raise a child than a 16-year-old! (I think it's a fair thought on the technician's part, although it's certainly insensitive of her to say so in front of Juno.)

I completely agree; the bulk of the theater (which was moderately filled with 20 - 30 couples) laughed and cheered. I felt so uncomfortable because I know that my friends and I were the only people that saw something wrong with the scene.

I certainly understand why all of you are uncomfortable with the scene. But I think it belongs in the film because it rings true and is one of the two turning points with Juno's relationship to her stepmother.

Both of Juno's parents have some basic faults. Her father is a little too obsessed with his work (he literally brings it home with him and repairs parts on the dining room table) and her stepmother is rather obsessive and sometimes caustic (her comment to the tech is the prime example). But when they are told of Juno's pregnancy and her decision to let her child be born, both of Juno's parents rally to her side to protect and guide her like parents should.

Juno's relationship to her biological mother is nearly nonexistent (only the annual gift of a cactus) and at the beginning of the movie she seems to dislike her stepmother (the repeated vomiting in her mother's vase/urn). But during the movie Juno sees that her stepmother is much wiser than Juno thought and is honestly looking out for Juno (the warning about spending time alone with a married man). She also demonstrates her very strong maternal feelings for Juno by overreacting to the technician's slight. Furthermore, it appears to me that Juno's stepmother respects the choice that Juno made to allow her child to live. The pregnancy is the event that binds Juno to her stepmother and allows her to let go of her feelings of abandonment by her biological mother, which I suspect is why Juno speaks in such a sardonic way, especially at the beginning of the film. It is her self-defense mechanism that allows her to hide herself and the emotional wounds she carries.

At the end of the film, she is able to love and be loved and she is able to accept her stepmother as part of her family.

"If the Christian subculture exists primarily to condemn the world, you can be sure that Jesus is not having any part of it." - John Fischer

"Ignorance is excusable when it is borne like a cross, but when it is wielded like an axe, and with moral indignation, then it becomes something else indeed." - Flannery O'Connor

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But an incredibly observant friend pointed out that he has seen that same hip / cleverness in friends, and it acts as a smokescreen for sadness underneath. I wonder if Juno is like that because of all of the hurt she has?

This was actually one of the best things about the film, I think, and the reason Page deserves all the acclaim she's getting. For all her impeccable delivery of the pre-scripted barbs, she never loses that subtext of vulnerability and the subsequent defensiveness. My favorite moments were those where she allowed Juno to lose a little steam-- talking to Paulie, explaining the pregnancy-- because it really grounds the witticisms she's spitting out the rest of the film.

Edited by N.K. Carter

Nathaniel K. Carter

www.nkcarter.com

"Every age has its own outlook. It is specially good at seeing certain truths and specially liable to make certain mistakes. We all, therefore, need the books that will correct the characteristic mistakes of our own period. And that means the old books." - C.S. Lewis

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Will, I'm glad my comments inspired you to respond twice! I'm honored :)

I do agree about the scenes with the technician; they belong in the film, and they do show us a lot about the stepmother. My uncomfortableness probably came from how the audience took it, though. People were saying things like, "yeah, take that!" and so forth. (Western Pennsylvania is a hot-spot for 'film interaction,' let me tell you.)

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There

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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It ends on a note of

wild optimism about true love, which is pretty bold, considering what we've seen throughout the film. I don't find the connection between these two to be very likely... but then, I know more than one happily married couple who fell in love at 16, so it's certainly not impossible. I like the ending a lot. Stay together. Make it meaningful. Forgive. Ednure the breakdowns and the tantrums. Get the band back together.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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And for the record, I'll take Sonic Youth over twee pop any day.

I don't think Mott the Hoople or the Ramones or any of the bands that Juno tries to introduce to Mark are "twee pop" ;).

IIRC, while Belle & Sebastian was used on the soundtrack of the film, it's not one of the bands that Juno expresses interest in.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Will, I'm glad my comments inspired you to respond twice! I'm honored :)

I kept getting an error message when I posted, so I tried a couple of times. I guess an extra one slipped through. I have terminated that unwanted post. :)

I do agree about the scenes with the technician; they belong in the film, and they do show us a lot about the stepmother. My uncomfortableness probably came from how the audience took it, though. People were saying things like, "yeah, take that!" and so forth.

There was some of that in our theater (both times I saw it), but most of the response came from the teen and adolescent kids. I hate going to see movies with teens, especially younger teens. Both times I saw this movie, I had to tell other audience members to stop talking and watch the movie. The first time I was even challenged by an older teen boy... I had to get up and have a talk with him before he quieted down.

"If the Christian subculture exists primarily to condemn the world, you can be sure that Jesus is not having any part of it." - John Fischer

"Ignorance is excusable when it is borne like a cross, but when it is wielded like an axe, and with moral indignation, then it becomes something else indeed." - Flannery O'Connor

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This isn

"If the Christian subculture exists primarily to condemn the world, you can be sure that Jesus is not having any part of it." - John Fischer

"Ignorance is excusable when it is borne like a cross, but when it is wielded like an axe, and with moral indignation, then it becomes something else indeed." - Flannery O'Connor

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OK, but does the boyfriend have anything approaching a mutual interest in this idyllic outcome? I don't see it. Juno goes through an emotional journey. The movie's about her. The boyfriend is just sort of ... there. And when Juno comes around, he's supposed to be ready to

make a lifelong commitment or something.

(Or does that overstate what's happening at the end?) Even if that's going too far, the word

"love"

is used, IIRC, and I don't know that I ever bought that. I'm glad that Juno's ready for the idea of

love, which she's seen tangibly displayed through the Jennifer Garner character toward Juno's child

, but I don't see how that translates to the boyfriend, or see much indication that he's

ready to reciprocate to the same extent Juno is ready to move forward.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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OK, but does the boyfriend have anything approaching a mutual interest in this idyllic outcome? I don't see it. Juno goes through an emotional journey. The movie's about her. The boyfriend is just sort of ... there.

He c

an't do much else since

she has k

ept her distance emotionally

. He makes a

hamhanded attempt to propose

that they

"get back together"

at one point, but she dismisses it immediately

claiming that they were never together

.

And when Juno comes around, he's supposed to be ready to

make a lifelong commitment or something.

(Or does that overstate what's happening at the end?)

I think you're

overstating

it.

Even if that's going too far, the word

"love"

is used, IIRC, and I don't know that I ever bought that. I'm glad that Juno's ready for the idea of

love, which she's seen tangibly displayed through the Jennifer Garner character toward Juno's child

, but I don't see how that translates to the boyfriend, or see much indication that he's

ready to reciprocate to the same extent Juno is ready to move forward.

Well the movie is

not

about the boyfriend, but in my opinion he

has been emotionally ready to participate in a real relationship with her

. I don't know if he has the

maturity level

needed for

a long-term commitment

, but then again,

neither does she

. And she has already admitted

experiencing

things that are

"way beyond [her] maturity level."

"If the Christian subculture exists primarily to condemn the world, you can be sure that Jesus is not having any part of it." - John Fischer

"Ignorance is excusable when it is borne like a cross, but when it is wielded like an axe, and with moral indignation, then it becomes something else indeed." - Flannery O'Connor

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If the movie convinces me of anything, it's that he LOVES her.

He likes her for who she is. He endures her tantrums, he sees through her misdirected anger, he sticks with her through it all, he knows what she needs there at the hospital, he's not afraid of his classmates' taunts when he kisses her in her "cautionary whale" state, and he's interested in her as a creative collaborator... not just a pro-creative collaborator.

You're never too young to find true love. It's just that few people are disciplined enough to make it work long-term. This movie doesn't make any declarations about whether or not he's equipped to make it work long-term. But it does suggest that he's got a better grasp of what love's really about than 99% of the guys his age. If 16-year-olds are going to fall in love, well... teach these two kids a little more discipline and restraint, and I like their chances.

Edited by Jeffrey Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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I greatly enjoyed this film. I think it is far better than Little Miss Sunshine for a whole variety of reasons. I also think their

getting together at the end was perfectly portrayed by the quirky little song they sang together. That fit their relationship.

In my reviewI began with:

For those who love authentic, well-written dialogue with straightforward honesty that is presented by engaging actors with nuanced directing, then Jason Reitman
Edited by Denny Wayman

Since 1995 we have authored a commentary on film, cinema in focus. Though we enjoy cinema as an art form, our interests lie not so much in reviewing a film as in beginning a conversation about the social and spiritual values presented. We, therefore, often rate a film higher or lower due to its message rather than its quality of acting or film-making.

Cinema In Focus Website

Free Methodist Church of Santa Barbara Website

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I haven't commented in here since I saw Children of Men, but I loved this film so much I wanted to see what the buzz was in these parts. Have to say I'm a little disappointed by the lack of enthusiasm.

*SPOILERS*

I thought it was a great film about complicated relationships that didn't insult my intelligence. Even at certain points when I was sure the absolutely predictable thing was going to happen (the scene when Mark and Juno are dancing - I was positive the wife was going to walk in), the story avoids the melodramatic and stays true to its tone. I loved how you know from the moment Juno asks Mark (at their first meeting with the lawyer) if he's ready to be a dad, and he gives a very lackluster answer about coaching soccer, or something - you know he is so not into this. And I love how his character unravels throughout the movie, beginning with the very hip music room in contrast to the rest of the very white and pale gray house, all the way to his passing comment the last time Juno visits the house, when he says Vanessa is not home, "so we're safe."

I love how the scenario of adoption and his relationship with Juno draws out Mark's complete immaturity. Juno awakens a suppressed side of himself - his creative, hip side that is sequestered to just one room of his own house - but instead of dealing with it like a man, he deals with it like a boy. This, in contrast to Bleeker who is a boy, but has some very man-like responses to Juno (like when he says something to her about how she'd be a mean wife. That was brilliant). Mark underestimates Juno, and thinks she will approve of his divorce because she is hip like him.

Mr. Zug made a great observation about covenant vs. contract - that Mark saw his marriage as a contract more than a covenant, but Juno saw her promise to them (and ultimately with Vanessa) as a covenant. I would add to this that her own family is covenantal, in that they loved her and supported her through the situation. She knows this, too, because she ultimately couldn't go through a secret abortion like the other girl her friend had to help out, but instead faced her parents and told them the truth. She trusted that her parents would not shame or disown her. She felt safe telling them.

I love Juno's blue collar family in contrast to the other seemingly perfect couple - how their conflicts are more on the surface instead of suppressed, how their love for and commitment to each other contains more emotion and honesty. I love how, in her immaturity, Juno picks an adoptive family that seems to fit her ideal family situation: a successful and happily married couple in the suburbs. This shows us where her heart is, and her longing. The fact that even this white-walled family is flawed devastates her, and we see that hard exterior turn into sobs on the side of the highway.

This is why I was not put off by her strong personality. She is so obviously using her schtick to deflect the gravity of her situation. You see this clearly in the scene when she visits Bleeker at his house and her face and countenance soften, and she asks if he will still think she's pretty when she's big and pregnant.

One subtle but poignant line is when a very pregnant Juno walks into the kitchen and her dad greets her by saying, "Hey there, big puffy version of Junebug!" It's not a big deal, and I almost didn't catch what he says, but in that subtle greeting you get a sense that the two are close, that there is no judgment or tension between them, that many days and weeks have gone by that are normal and perhaps even mundane.

I agree with TexasWill's take on the ultrasound scene. I think it belongs there to show how the family sticks together, and how Brenda takes responsibility for Juno as her own daughter in contrast to her birth mother's abandonment. This is further reinforced when Juno is in labor, and Brenda sticks her head out the door and yells, "Can I get a spinal tap for my kid?!" I've long held the theory that moms are like (or should be) 'mama bears,' in that they are tender and stern with their kids, yet will tear you to pieces if you attack or even seem remotely threatening. I think this scene draws out Brenda's mama bear-ness over Juno.

As for the pro-divorce thing, I don't see it that way at all. The movie isn't about Mark and Vanessa, so that aspect of the story is a plot point, but is not meant to be developed in depth.

As a mother to a very strong willed almost-five-year-old, I thought hard about what my reaction would be to a similar scenario down the road. I wondered if I will be the kind of mom she would feel safe telling, or if she would feel the wrath of my judgment and sneak around behind my back. I wondered how I need to parent her now to ensure she will see me as safe then. I could picture her angrily dumping a slushy in my urn when called out on inappropriate behavior, but I could also picture myself in the room, holding her hand during the ultrasound.

There are so many more reasons why I loved this movie, but I'm starting to feel my articulation fade. Thoughts?

[edited to add a spoilers warning]

Edited by Mrs. Zug

One Woman, Many Piles, Much Grace

The Pile I'm Standing In.

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Mr. Zug made a great observation about covenant vs. contract...

** SPOILERS **

Easily one of my top 10 films of all time -- it is less about the pro hipster/life/choice/divorce/yada themes and more about this idea of covenant. The entire weight of the movie to me comes down to what are you gonna do Juno? Your idea of the good life (and the future of your baby) has just been shattered. You are driving away in tears in your beater blue mini-van (a subtle visual token to the myth of "happily ever after"). We are worried that you are driving too fast. You are going past concrete pylons. Your hipster coping mechanism cannot clever it's way out of this one. Throbbing in her head, "Maybe our entropy toward cacti is inevitable". How can this stop.

And then she pulls off the road and Reitman crafts the frame meticulously.

There is a train moving steadily by to the left (zug in German means train). There is a broken boat, sunk as it were, to the right, just next to the beater mini-van. What are you gonna do Juno? Is this whole thing (kids, love, marriage, life, the existential hopelessness of humanity) sunk?

And in the end it comes down to her routing around for a yellow receipt to write on -- but not just any receipt -- a jiffy lube receipt (recall 'lube' form any other scene?) that she grabs for specifically -- her beater van is strewn with paper, but she particularly goes for that receipt -- that agreement, that contract between the technicians at Jiffy lube who worked on her (or her parents) car -- and she write on it, something that we do not know until later way after she drops it old school (or rather 'Old Testament') style onto the doorstep of the couple, like Moses into the river.

It isn't until we see the frame where the "family picture" was supposed to be in the nursery that it begins to dawn on us what this act actually meant -- in red marker (or crayon perhaps) she has said, "I'm in if you're in" -- as compelling an act of faith as one I have seen in film -- that "as for me and my household", everything may be going to shit and though I would like to control it (in a uniquely American individualistic hipster sorta way), I'm gonna do what I can and trust that the crocodiles of real life (which is not mythical "happily ever after land") are not gonna kill, well, at least me and this decision that is in front of me right now.

Like I said great film -- that it is not watered down to 1 binary choice is brilliant -- it is about the thousand daily choices to see "the sunshine coming out of your significant other's ass" come hell or high water.

---

As a dad of a smart sassy 5 year old girl, I love this film because it does not lie to her on this particular point -- "happily ever after" is the myth that I believe kills many of our American marriages -- as my daughter asks if she can watch barbie this or disney bumbling dad that, I will often respond with no -- and when she asks why, I often say something like -- "because barbie lies to us -- this is not what beauty looks like" -- or "in the real world, little girls are not always at odds with their daddies" -- there is something here in Juno that resonates deeply with me on this.

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FWIW, my mom really liked the movie, and said that this review summed up her opinions pretty well.

For myself,

the romantic conclusion bugged me. It was perfect for Juno but not for Bleeker, except in an immature now-I-have-a-makeout-partner way. After she had treated him like crap, it's just not right for her to march up and treat his love like a given, which is pretty much what she does. It's wish fulfillment on Cody's part, and it soured me on the whole rest of the movie, which was generally excellent.

That's just how eye roll.

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Ah, high school.

I was so in love with my high school girlfriend that I hung in there through almost weekly outbursts. She changed her mind every few days as to whether we "were" or we "weren't." She was unusual too, and always seemed startled by the assurance that I thought she was beautiful. And even though I was as compelled by hormones as the next fellow, I was going to weather any storm for her. I "get" Bleeker.

I've been there, where you declare your love for a girl, she revels in the compliment, and then she suggests someone else you should go out with. And then when you do try steering your attentions elsewhere, she gets jealous and comes running back and declares her own change of heart. I've been through all of that. Didn't strain my imagination at all.

Now, should I have let her treat me like that? That's another question. But we did eventually find firmer footing and dated for quite a while.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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"Get real, Juno."

As an unapologetically old-school feminist, the father of a soon-to-be-teenage daughter, a reporter who regularly talks to actual teens as part of his beat and a plain old moviegoer, I hated, hated, hated this movie. A few of my many problems:

*The notion that kids -- even smart and sarcastic ones -- talk like Juno is a lie only thirtysomething filmmakers and fiftysomething movie critics could buy. You want accurate wisecracking high-school dialog? Go back to MTV's animated "Daria" or Sara Gilbert's Darlene on "Roseanne." Or, as Juno says, "Honest to blog!"

*Are we really supposed to believe that a girl as intelligent and self-empowered as Juno, when determining the time to lose her virginity via a planned encounter with her best friend, neglects to bring birth control? Or that her endearingly human parents, no matter how non-judgmental, accept the news of her pregnancy so nonchalantly? And why doesn't anybody, including the father, respectfully ask the ever-sneering Juno her reasoning for having the baby and giving it up for adoption?

*I lived in Minneapolis, where the film is set, in the early '90s, and every day on my way to work, I passed a women's clinic besieged by angry protesters determined to deny its patients access. It was no laughing matter, and regardless of your personal politics at a time when the future of Roe v. Wade is very much in doubt, the clinicians, the patients and even the protesters all deserve more complex, nuanced and thoughtful portraits than the simplistic and insulting caricatures drawn by Cody.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Bah humbug I say.

Charles Taylor, in a far-ranging rant:

We are in an era when ideological opposites nonetheless affirm the same vision. The right and the left believe America's function is to serve the rich and powerful and bully other nations. The new born- again atheists, epitomized by Richard Dawkins and his book "The God Delusion," put the same blind faith in science and reason they accuse fundamentalists of putting in religion.

At the movies, the most depressing example of this is the backlash against "Juno," "Knocked Up," and even the sweet, soft, in consequential and enjoyable little picture "Waitress" claiming them as right-to-life briefs because in each the pregnant heroine chooses to bring her pregnancy to term rather than have an abortion.

Reading the complaints that "Knocked Up" is a conservative movie that can't bring itself to even say the word abortion and that "Juno" -- a movie you'd have to be an unimaginably miserable cuss not to enjoy -- betrays its tough teenage heroine, you can't fool yourself that the critics making those charges have any belief in the concept of pro-choice.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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I agree with Taylor on those points.

But I agree with the previous rant when it comes to Juno's dialect. I think it's the film's biggest flaw. The way she talks may as well qualify as a super-power. I talked to a couple of college girls, sophomores at SPU, this week. Both English majors, both smart, both just out of high school. They both loved Atonement and Enchanted. They both shrugged off Juno, saying that the girl was really annoying and unbelievable. And they're closer to that scene than I am at this point.

Don't get me wrong, I do *enjoy* the way she talks. I just think it hurts the film's otherwise remarkable depth and substance.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Thanks for linking to Taylor, SDG. I encourage everyone to read the entire article, if only to see that Taylor's politics weren't left-wing enough for Salon.com, which fired him after rewriting his not-positive-enough review of Michael Moore's Farenheit 9/11. It's instructive to remember how a place like Salon, which I read and which is big on talking about the evils of the "right," acts toward its own writers when they don't toe a particular line in terms of art criticism! But thank goodness they're out there, speaking "truth" to power.

(Yes, I'm bitter that Taylor was fired, although I think Salon's movie coverage in general is top-notch.)

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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I agree with Taylor on those points.

But I agree with the previous rant when it comes to Juno's dialect. I think it's the film's biggest flaw. The way she talks may as well qualify as a super-power. I talked to a couple of college girls, sophomores at SPU, this week. Both English majors, both smart, both just out of high school. They both loved Atonement and Enchanted. They both shrugged off Juno, saying that the girl was really annoying and unbelievable. And they're closer to that scene than I am at this point.

Don't get me wrong, I do *enjoy* the way she talks. I just think it hurts the film's otherwise remarkable depth and substance.

This was definitely the movie's biggest flaw. Not enough to make the film unejoyable, but there was hardly a single "real" thing in Juno's entire character or storyline. She talked like a screenwriter trying to show how very very clever and funny she was, not as a real person, even a snarky teenage one. The way her family reacted to her situation throughout the movie was rarely even close to believable, and the resolution with Beeker - as David said - it's impossible to reasonably believe that the relationship will last any significant amount of time and be worth much in the end. Despite what Juno's dad claimed, a relationship can't be built on Juno finding someone who thinks she's always got sunshine coming out of her butt. At the very least, she needs to find someone who *she thinks* also has sunshine coming out of *his* butt - and her "acceptance" of him at the end certainly fell well short of that.

It's ironic that what made the movie work for me - and what I thoroughly enjoyed - was the Bateman/Gardner storyline. Those characters felt very real, and moved me frequently, in a way that the Juno/Beeker storyline never did.

"You guys don't really know who you're dealing with."

"Oh yeah, and who exactly are we dealing with?"

"I'm the mother flippin' rhymenoceros."

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This was definitely the movie's biggest flaw. Not enough to make the film unejoyable, but there was hardly a single "real" thing in Juno's entire character or storyline. She talked like a screenwriter trying to show how very very clever and funny she was, not as a real person, even a snarky teenage one. The way her family reacted to her situation throughout the movie was rarely even close to believable, and the resolution with Beeker - as David said - it's impossible to reasonably believe that the relationship will last any significant amount of time and be worth much in the end. Despite what Juno's dad claimed, a relationship can't be built on Juno finding someone who thinks she's always got sunshine coming out of her butt. At the very least, she needs to find someone who *she thinks* also has sunshine coming out of *his* butt - and her "acceptance" of him at the end certainly fell well short of that.

I agree that the steady stream of quirk pouring from Juno's mouth was irritating as it was amusing (and incredibly unrealistic), but as I said before, I felt like there was a kernel of truth her behavior. I don't know anyone who talks like that, but I have met people that were a lesser version -- lots of witty comments (though no where near as consistent as Juno). And these people are almost always using it as a smokescreen for something, be it self-loathing or some other great sadness. Maybe Diablo Cody did that intentionally, knowing full-well that no girl -- or person for that matter -- would talk just like; maybe it was pointing at something else?

Just pouring out a few thoughts.

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