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The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo


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  • 1 month later...
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Persona wrote:

: The experience I had renting films in many countries in Europe is from '90-2000. The rentals I saw were subtitled.

Ah. I was thinking more of theatrical experiences.

Theaters were subtitled in the language of the country, too. But I didn't keep a film journal back then, I wish I did -- the only one I can definitely be sure of (you know how bad my memory is) is L.A. Confidential, which would have been 1997. It's subtitles were in Swedish. I know there were quite a few more than that, but I can't remember any other one specifically.

I'm from Sweden and I guess I didn't expect this whole discussion on a North American forum but here it is. So anyway, one of the last times I saw an American film in Sweden (a few years ago now, since I've been in LA for a while) I had the option of going to the "original language" screening or the subtitled one. That was Bee Movie so maybe it was so people would get a chance to enjoy the English puns (Can you imagine how hard it is to translate a movie with jokes and puns like that???).

Subtitling (as opposed to dubbing) is so common in Scandinavia that I don't remember ever watching anything dubbed to Swedish except animated films (which makes sense to me to dubb but confused me when I was a kid trying to read lips and say those Swedish words with the English lip movements, lol) but like someone pointed out, it's much more common in some countries. Relatively recently I think I saw something dubbed to Russian but I don't remember the release date of it. Not sure why some countries dub while others don't. Does anyone know? Maybe it's just out of habit but who started the habit? Was it originally a financial issue related to the financial situation in the East and West after WW2 or something? Curious.

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  • 3 months later...

Here's a reaction that I hadn't yet seen to the rape scene:

I downloaded the Swedish movie version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo a few months ago and watched it on my iPad on a long flight. In the middle there is a rape scene. It is brutal, and it is supposed to be brutal. The victim is the title character, a cold and bizarre creature who bears no resemblance whatever to my own extraordinarily winsome daughters. And yet, watching it, I found myself bursting into loud and agonized sobs on Virgin America’s Flight 23 to San Francisco.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's a reaction that I hadn't yet seen to the rape scene:

I downloaded the Swedish movie version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo a few months ago and watched it on my iPad on a long flight. In the middle there is a rape scene. It is brutal, and it is supposed to be brutal. The victim is the title character, a cold and bizarre creature who bears no resemblance whatever to my own extraordinarily winsome daughters. And yet, watching it, I found myself bursting into loud and agonized sobs on Virgin America’s Flight 23 to San Francisco.

Yeah. There's a reason this movie (and others like it) should come with a massive "TRIGGER WARNING" in place of the copyright notice.

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Here's a reaction that I hadn't yet seen to the rape scene:

I downloaded the Swedish movie version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo a few months ago and watched it on my iPad on a long flight. In the middle there is a rape scene. It is brutal, and it is supposed to be brutal. The victim is the title character, a cold and bizarre creature who bears no resemblance whatever to my own extraordinarily winsome daughters. And yet, watching it, I found myself bursting into loud and agonized sobs on Virgin America’s Flight 23 to San Francisco.

Yeah. There's a reason this movie (and others like it) should come with a massive "TRIGGER WARNING" in place of the copyright notice.

I've had months to prepare myself for it, and I'm now number 3 in a holds queue of 163 people for the DVD. I can't really say that I'm excited to see it, but I do think I'll make a point of watching it, unlike some of the other DVDs that finally come through the queue, only to be returned a week later, unseen.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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  • 2 weeks later...

I finally saw this movie and thought it neither as bad as its many critics find it, nor nearly as good as all those 4-star reviews plastered across the DVD jacket. Two-and-a-half stars seems about right. The film's portrayal of Lisbeth couldn't match the book's, but curiously, I think I liked Blomqvist more in the movie than in the novel.

It bothers me that the rape scenes didn't upset me nearly as much as I thought they might. Was a day not too long ago when I couldn't watch anything approaching what this film depicts. Maybe the whole "desensitized to violence" thing goes in cycles, or swings back and forth (slowly) like a pendulum? Pick your metaphor.

I liked this one enough to want to see the second film in the series.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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I finally saw this movie and thought it neither as bad as its many critics find it, nor nearly as good as all those 4-star reviews plastered across the DVD jacket. Two-and-a-half stars seems about right.

That’s about the size of it for me as well. Not great, but certainly not bad. A good, all-around solid film (until that debacle of an ending). For whatever reason, after seeing it, it struck me as an appropriate lower bar-setter. Meaning, I think that such examples of filmmaking competence ought not be so few and far between. It’s not so great a film that it would be unreasonable of me to expect the same from every filmmaker. It is plenty good enough to avoid glaring oversights and annoying pitfalls*, a feat which anyone who considers themselves a ‘filmmaker’ should be able to muster with a little care and pride. Or so I estimate.

*Except for the ending(s).

I'm not sure why the rape scene didn’t hit me all that hard either. It’s certainly not lacking in terms of explicitness. Perhaps the strength of the lead character is a little contagious? Perhaps the score does something to lessen the blow? (I can’t remember the score at all, so that’s just a blind throw at the dartboard.)

Edited by Judo Chop

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I finally saw this movie and thought it neither as bad as its many critics find it, nor nearly as good as all those 4-star reviews plastered across the DVD jacket. Two-and-a-half stars seems about right. The film's portrayal of Lisbeth couldn't match the book's, but curiously, I think I liked Blomqvist more in the movie than in the novel.

FWIW, I gave it three on NetFlix. I've dogged it a bit in this thread, but my overall impression (beyond that it doesn't stand up too well to second viewings) is solidly in the "it's okay" camp. Still, there are countless made-for-tv murder mysteries that have covered similar ground, and done it better than it's done here. For murder-in-the-past, I'll take Poirot: Five Little Pigs over this movie any day. (Has anyone seen the Suchet Murder on the Orient Express? It doesn't really dovetail with this movie at all, beyond raising questions of revenge, but it lays both Dragon Tattoo and The Secrets in their Eyes to waste as a mystery-thriller. Dialogue's better, too).

I liked this one enough to want to see the second film in the series.

It's in my queue. It has been since it came out. I've not been able to muster the interest. I'm curious to see what Fincher does in the remake, though.

Edited by NBooth
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  • 5 months later...

Due November 22: Dragon Tattoo Trilogy: Extended Edition Blu-Ray

Music Box's Blu-ray box set restores over two hours to the aggregate running time of the Dragon Tattoo Trilogy, making these initial adaptations of the Larsson mysteries much more faithful to their source material. Early reports have indicated that the films will have 5.1 Dolby Digital audio, with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo shown in its original aspect ratio of 2.39:1 and The Girl Who Played with Fire and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest receiving 1.85:1 transfers.
Edited by NBooth
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  • 3 months later...

And now Slant has a review:

The "Millennium" completist doesn't need to be told to pick this up, but would be well advised to understand that the set contains the TV version of the trilogy. It's not a question of abridgment or censorship: Quite the opposite, all three films are expanded, but subdivided into six 90-minute episodes.

Hmm. I was hoping that the extended version of Dragon Tattoo would address the issues I had with characterization (namely, that there isn't any beyond Salander). Has anyone on-board seen the longer cut, and--if so--is that the best way to go if I want to give the movie a third try?

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  • 5 years later...

Is the original Swedish film trilogy worth a go? I ask this as someone who absolutely hated the novel - it's firmly on my list of worst-written books I've ever read - but who finds Fincher's film curiously alluring and rewatchable, despite it being built on such shaky ground.

Sad about Nyqvist. Poor guy got stuck as an awful lot of subpar villains in Hollywood dreck - I'm tempted to look up one of his Swedish films so I have something more substantial to remember him by.

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I remember liking the original Swedish movie, but its sequels reminded me of the worst Roger Moore Bond movies. (I'm pretty sure I got into that in one of the other threads here.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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