Jump to content

Iron Man Three a.k.a. Iron Man 3


Peter T Chattaway
 Share

Recommended Posts

Links to our threads on Iron Man (2008), The Incredible Hulk (2008), Iron Man 2 (2010), Thor (2011), The First Avenger: Captain America (2011) and The Avengers (2012).

Link to our thread on 'Disney Buys Marvel Entertainment'.

- - -

Paramount To End Relationship With Marvel In 2012: Disney Will Distribute 'Iron Man 3' and 'The Avengers'

The Walt Disney Studios deal to buy Paramount Pictures out of the final two films of its six-picture distribution deal with Marvel Studios amounts to the Mouse paying a premium to get cracking on its $4 billion investment in Marvel. When you break down the numbers, it's a pretty good deal for both studios. Paramount had been earning an 8% distribution fee on the Marvel titles like Iron Man. Paramount also put up P&A and got reimbursed over time. The $115 million will be paid in two installments--half when The Avengers is released May 4, 2012, and the other half when Iron Man 3 is released May 3, 2013. . . .

Deadline.com, October 18

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • Replies 169
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

'Iron Man 3' Will Be A Sequel To 'Thor,' 'Captain America' And 'The Avengers,' Says Jon Favreau

Although he hasn't seen the script for "The Avengers" yet, Favreau said he's eager to see what the next few years have in store for the Marvel movie universe — especially since he sees "Iron Man 3" as a sequel to all the Marvel Studios movies that come before it.

"In theory, 'Iron Man 3' is going to be a sequel or continuation of 'Thor,' 'Hulk,' 'Captain America' and 'Avengers,'" he said. "This whole world... I have no idea what it is. I don't think they do either, from conversations I've had with those guys."

Favreau indicated that the fluid nature of Marvel's films up to, during, and even after filming makes it difficult to predict the exact nature of the movie universe when it comes time for "Iron Man 3." With so many things likely to change between now and when the first word is written in the "Iron Man 3" script, the filmmaker said he's can't even venture a guess about what will be going on with Tony Stark when he returns to his solo adventures. . . .

MTV Splash Page, December 6

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jon Favreau Will Not Direct Iron Man 3

The poet Robert Browning once wrote that "a man in armor is his armor's slave." By that logic, director Jon Favreau is now a free man: Insiders tell Vulture that Favreau has just informed Marvel Studios that he won't direct a third Iron Man film.

It's unclear whether the impasse was financial or creative or both. One informed source hears that he was frustrated with Marvel's urge to stuff more of their in-house heroes into the next film in the wake of The Avengers. . . .

Still other industry insiders look at Favreau's growing price tag and speculate that he was getting too expensive for the frugal Marvel and its equally cost-conscious parent company, Disney. In fact, one Hollywood player familiar with Marvel's playbook theorizes that the company had been pushing a confusing and packed vision of the third film as a tactic to provoke Favreau into leaving the project. . . .

Regardless of why, we’re told that Marvel quietly began the process of finding a director to replace Favreau last night. But Marvel’s task is complicated by the fact that Downey Jr. has both contractually negotiated director approval and is currently the hottest leading man in Hollywood with first pick of dozens of "go" movies around town. . . .

Vulture, New York, December 14

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

As a fourteen year-old boy, I never imagined as an adult I'd have a Wii, or a 5-1/2 year old son. I also never imagined you'd be able to design your own characters called "Miis," and that while making dinner one night I'd hear the kid explaining to my daughter how he was trying to design his latest Mii to look like Tony Stark.

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I could get behind that. Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang was a blast. The Iron Man series' greatest strength has always been the off-kilter chemistry between the characters, and I think Black has shown himself more than able to deliver on that score. Of course, this would mean that Rhodes would have to be recast again...

...with Val Kilmer. :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A one-time director (of a complete flop) and the writer of some of the worst films of the late 80's/early 90's.

Absolutely perfect for a film like "Iron Man 3" and the audience it targets. :)

Since I've not seen the Lethal Weapon movies, I can't speak to them, but Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang (though it might have "flopped," as they say, at the box office) is absolutely marvelous. I think Black's way with characters is well suited to the screwball-comedy-in-a-powersuit that is the Iron Man series. He's certainly a more natural fit for the franchise than, say, Snyder is for Superman. ;)

Count me excited about this news.

Edited by NBooth
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A one-time director (of a complete flop) and the writer of some of the worst films of the late 80's/early 90's.

Absolutely perfect for a film like "Iron Man 3" and the audience it targets. :)

Seriously, i have never heard someone be so dismissive of Black...but then, most of what I ever read about him was from screenwriters who always had nothing but praise for his writing.

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A one-time director (of a complete flop) and the writer of some of the worst films of the late 80's/early 90's.

Absolutely perfect for a film like "Iron Man 3" and the audience it targets. :)

Since I've not seen the Lethal Weapon movies, I can't speak to them, but Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang (though it might have "flopped," as they say, at the box office) is absolutely marvelous. I think Black's way with characters is well suited to the screwball-comedy-in-a-powersuit that is the Iron Man series. He's certainly a more natural fit for the franchise than, say, Snyder is for Superman. ;)

Count me excited about this news.

Me too.

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
Opus, Twitter, Facebook

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A one-time director (of a complete flop) and the writer of some of the worst films of the late 80's/early 90's.

Absolutely perfect for a film like "Iron Man 3" and the audience it targets. :)

Seriously, i have never heard someone be so dismissive of Black...but then, most of what I ever read about him was from screenwriters who always had nothing but praise for his writing.

I didn't completely dismiss him. If you'll re-read my original post, I said he's perfect for this type of film.

I, personally, just don't think he has that great of a resume. It's still amazing to see that these films are actually being taken seriously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you'll re-read my original post, I said he's perfect for this type of film.

Sure, but only as a snarky put-down of the IRON MAN films.

I, personally, just don't think he has that great of a resume.

His resume has its weaker and stronger entries. It's always tricky with screenwriting resumes because it's often hard to know how much control a screenwriter has over the finished product (i.e. whether there were uncredited rewrites, etc.). LETHAL WEAPON and KISS KISS BANG BANG are strong enough, and, as far as I can tell, they're the two over which he had the most control. I can see him turning in a pretty fun IRON MAN 3, provided, of course, that Marvel lets him do his thing. It's possible they won't. After all, not much of Ken Branagh's personality is on display in those THOR trailers.

It's still amazing to see that these films are actually being taken seriously.

Who's taking them seriously?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's still amazing to see that these films are actually being taken seriously.

Who's taking them seriously?

There's probably a big difference between taking something seriously and just allowing yourself to have fun. I collected Iron Man comics as a teenager, so that's where it pulls me in. It's a fun revisiting of a former life, almost. But the IM films have been well made, and that's a lot of fun for an established fan, especially considering that the typical comic book film isn't.

Edited by Persona

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But the IM films have been well made, and that's a lot of fun for an established fan, especially considering that the typical comic book film isn't.

The IRON MAN flicks strike me as pretty "standard" as far as comic book flicks go. They found a nice charismatic star who knows how to ad-lib, but in other respects, I don't think they're too special.

But I'm a DC guy, not a Marvel guy, so take that for what it's worth.

Edited by Ryan H.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

But the IM films have been well made, and that's a lot of fun for an established fan, especially considering that the typical comic book film isn't.

The IRON MAN flicks strike me as pretty "standard" as far as comic book flicks go. They found a nice charismatic star who knows how to ad-lib, but in other respects, I don't think they're too special.

Which just goes to show how low typical comic-book superhero movies have set the bar. "Special," no. Fun, yes, and that alone sets them above most of their peers. Of the recent spate, only Chris Nolan and Bryan Singer have even aimed at more than "fun," certainly with any success. Raimi at his best delivered higher quantities of a certain kind of fun than the Iron Man films, but he also fell below them at times, and in any case didn't really go beyond the "fun" criterion. (Am I forgetting anything? I can't think what.)

Also, I think even the briefest list of the Iron Man flicks' assets ought to count Gwyneth Paltrow.

It's still amazing to see that these films are actually being taken seriously.

Who's taking them seriously?

What Ryan said.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Which just goes to show how low typical comic-book superhero movies have set the bar. "Special," no. Fun, yes, and that alone sets them above most of their peers.

Yup. Film hasn't really done well by this genre, as this list of American superhero films demonstrates.

Of the recent spate, only Chris Nolan and Bryan Singer have even aimed at more than "fun," certainly with any success. Raimi at his best delivered higher quantities of a certain kind of fun than the Iron Man films, but he also fell below them at times, and in any case didn't really go beyond the "fun" criterion. (Am I forgetting anything? I can't think what.)

Hm. Well, I have a lot of affection for HELLBOY II: THE GOLDEN ARMY (it has far more personality than the IRON MAN flicks, I find it to be more amusing than any of the Raimi SPIDER-MAN flicks, too), but that's also largely a case of it just being fun.

I suppose we could mention WATCHMEN, but that's more of an interesting failure, but it's interesting enough to me--particularly in its more extended cuts--that I'll turn to it before I'll turn to, say, Singer's X-MEN or SUPERMAN RETURNS, but I can't say it's actually a good film. In places it's downright unpleasant. So it's kinda a glass half-full/half-empty sort of thing.

Also, I think even the briefest list of the Iron Man flicks' assets ought to count Gwyneth Paltrow.

Oh, yes. I forgot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of the recent spate, only Chris Nolan and Bryan Singer have even aimed at more than "fun," certainly with any success. Raimi at his best delivered higher quantities of a certain kind of fun than the Iron Man films, but he also fell below them at times, and in any case didn't really go beyond the "fun" criterion. (Am I forgetting anything? I can't think what.)

Hm. Well, I have a lot of affection for HELLBOY II: THE GOLDEN ARMY (it has far more personality than the IRON MAN flicks, I find it to be more amusing than any of the Raimi SPIDER-MAN flicks, too), but that's also largely a case of it just being fun.

Yeah, okay, Hellboy II is worth counting with the Spider-Man and Iron Man flicks, although its middle-movie irresolution and post-Christian mythic subversiveness, among other factors, somewhat spoils it for me.

The ugliness and heroic vacuum of Watchmen spoils it for me pretty much completely.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ugliness and heroic vacuum of Watchmen spoils it for me pretty much completely.

I'll complain about the brutality of Snyder's adaptation, which is extremely excessive, as well as its failure to capture the somewhat lighter, more humorous touch of the graphic novel and its more tender, human moments. But I don't find its subversion of superheroes or the abyss of meaning that it leaves us with altogether distasteful, and there are some sequences that really are quite something in Snyder's WATCHMEN, sequences that are arguably more impressive than anything in the competition (Dr. Manhattan's flashbacks on Mars, for example).

Edited by Ryan H.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Without recapitulating the Watchmen debate here, I'll just say that a movie that "leaves us with an abyss of meaning" needs a lot more, specifically a lot more philosophical depth and human feeling, than this one to earn my appreciation. Instead of the needed depth and human feeling, this film piles on graphic violence and sex. I'm sure the Martian flashback was impressive -- I can't say it stuck with me -- and I admired some sights along the way, but definitely not worth the trip by my lights.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...